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Hatchery Company

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BUSINESS
December 18, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
American Greetings Corp., a 100-year-old greeting-card company, said it bought a major stake in Hatchery, which develops and produces family and children's entertainment. Terms were not disclosed. The partnership will enable American Greetings, creator of Care Bears and Strawberry Shortcake, to use its characters in Hatchery's films, videos and TV shows.
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BUSINESS
December 18, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
American Greetings Corp., a 100-year-old greeting-card company, said it bought a major stake in Hatchery, which develops and produces family and children's entertainment. Terms were not disclosed. The partnership will enable American Greetings, creator of Care Bears and Strawberry Shortcake, to use its characters in Hatchery's films, videos and TV shows.
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BUSINESS
November 12, 2003 | Sallie Hofmeister
Veteran television executive Margaret Loesch has paired up with former president of Mattel Inc. Bruce Stein to produce entertainment and consumer products for children and families. Their new company, Hatchery, is financed by investors including Peter Guber and Paul Schaeffer of Mandalay Entertainment Group. Loesch was the founding president of Fox Kids Networks Worldwide, which gave News Corp. a beachhead in children's television. She most recently was chief executive of the U.S.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2003 | Sallie Hofmeister
Veteran television executive Margaret Loesch has paired up with former president of Mattel Inc. Bruce Stein to produce entertainment and consumer products for children and families. Their new company, Hatchery, is financed by investors including Peter Guber and Paul Schaeffer of Mandalay Entertainment Group. Loesch was the founding president of Fox Kids Networks Worldwide, which gave News Corp. a beachhead in children's television. She most recently was chief executive of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Shirley Temple Black, who as the most popular child movie star of all time lifted a filmgoing nation's spirits during the Depression and then grew up to be a diplomat, has died. She was 85. Black died late Monday at her home in Woodside, Calif., according to publicist Cheryl J. Kagan. No cause was given. From 1935 through 1938, the curly-haired moppet billed as Shirley Temple was the top box-office draw in the nation. She saved what became 20th Century Fox studios from bankruptcy and made more than 40 movies before she turned 12. PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black Hollywood recognized the enchanting, dimpled scene-stealer's importance to the industry with a “special award” -- a miniature Oscar -- at the Academy Awards for 1934, the year she sang and danced her way into America's collective heart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
Charles Black, a businessman, maritime expert and the husband of former child star Shirley Temple Black, died Thursday of complications of a bone marrow disease, his widow said. He was 86. Black died at his home in the San Francisco suburb of Woodside, with his wife of 55 years and other family members by his side. He had suffered from myelodysplastic syndrome for nearly three years. The couple met in 1950 in Honolulu, where Black had been working for a shipping company.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2005 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Some of the hottest toys in America for kids ages 4 and up are $20 "Star Wars" light sabers that have been upgraded to change colors or vibrate with "feel the Force" combat action. The plastic swords do more than make cash registers ring; each one is a reminder to youngsters that a brand-new "Star Wars" film hits theaters May 19. But there is a dark side to the retail force.
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