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Hate Crime Texas

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October 19, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 20,000 computer users across the country received an electronic "mail bomb" Monday when someone apparently broke into a Texas college professor's Internet account and fired off a racist message to addresses culled from several sites on the global network.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1998 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For one father, this Father's Day was not a day to gather with family around cards and presents. Instead, James Byrd Sr., whose son's savage death at the hands of alleged white supremacists in Jasper, Texas, grabbed headlines two weeks ago, spent Sunday visiting two Southland churches and talking about peace and reconciliation. "Love is able to heal all wounds," Byrd said before attending services at the All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1998 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For one father, this Father's Day was not a day to gather with family around cards and presents. Instead, James Byrd Sr., whose son's savage death at the hands of alleged white supremacists in Jasper, Texas, grabbed headlines two weeks ago, spent Sunday visiting two Southland churches and talking about peace and reconciliation. "Love is able to heal all wounds," Byrd said before attending services at the All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 20,000 computer users across the country received an electronic "mail bomb" Monday when someone apparently broke into a Texas college professor's Internet account and fired off a racist message to addresses culled from several sites on the global network.
OPINION
June 14, 1998 | Martin E. Marty, Martin E. Marty is a professor of the history of religion at the University of Chicago and senior editor of the Christian Century magazine. He directs the Public Religion Project, a nonprofit group analyzing the role of religion in public life
A "hate crime," everyone calls the killing last week in Jasper, Texas. A crime it certainly was, when three white men allegedly chained a black man to their pickup truck and dragged him two miles on a country road, strewing his severed head, neck and arm as they went. A crime it has to be, because the killing violates law, and because it was a "senseless, or disgraceful act," in dictionary definitions. Senseless it was to offer a ride to, then allegedly murder James Byrd Jr.
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