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Hate Crimes Indonesia

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NEWS
February 22, 2001 | Associated Press
Clashes between rival ethnic groups in the Indonesian part of the island of Borneo have left more than 100 people dead, police said today. Many of the dead were mutilated and at least 20 people were beheaded, said Sgt. Tigei, a police spokesman in the town of Sampit in Central Kalimantan province. Clashes in Sampit between indigenous Dayaks and immigrants from other parts of Indonesia first erupted Sunday.
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NEWS
February 22, 2001 | Associated Press
Clashes between rival ethnic groups in the Indonesian part of the island of Borneo have left more than 100 people dead, police said today. Many of the dead were mutilated and at least 20 people were beheaded, said Sgt. Tigei, a police spokesman in the town of Sampit in Central Kalimantan province. Clashes in Sampit between indigenous Dayaks and immigrants from other parts of Indonesia first erupted Sunday.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President B.J. Habibie paid a visit Tuesday to Glodok, the Chinese neighborhood that was shattered and torched by rioters this month, but it was more than an ordinary sympathy call. The loot-and-burn rampage by protesters who drove former President Suharto from power not only destroyed the confidence of the ethnic Chinese who form the backbone of Indonesia's economy, but nearly wiped out the nation's high-technology nerve center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after arriving in Los Angeles in 1977, David Tan legally reclaimed the Chinese surname his family had been forced to give up a decade earlier when the Indonesian government banned the use of Chinese names, language or characters. He spent the next two decades quietly carving out a new life for himself, his wife and three children, settling in the eastern San Gabriel Valley community of Walnut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after arriving in Los Angeles in 1977, David Tan legally reclaimed the Chinese surname his family had been forced to give up a decade earlier when the Indonesian government banned the use of Chinese names, language or characters. He spent the next two decades quietly carving out a new life for himself, his wife and three children, settling in the eastern San Gabriel Valley community of Walnut.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President B.J. Habibie paid a visit Tuesday to Glodok, the Chinese neighborhood that was shattered and torched by rioters this month, but it was more than an ordinary sympathy call. The loot-and-burn rampage by protesters who drove former President Suharto from power not only destroyed the confidence of the ethnic Chinese who form the backbone of Indonesia's economy, but nearly wiped out the nation's high-technology nerve center.
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