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NEWS
February 28, 1997 | MICHAEL A. FLETCHER, THE WASHINGTON POST
A former Army paratrooper and member of a white supremacist group was convicted Thursday in the murders of a black couple that prompted a worldwide investigation into the level of extremist activity within the Army's ranks. A North Carolina jury found James N. Burmeister, 21, guilty of two counts of first-degree murder and conspiracy in the December 1995 shooting deaths of Jackie Burden, 22, and Michael James, 36. The couple was shot at close range while strolling down a dirt road near Ft.
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NEWS
May 13, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A former Army paratrooper was sentenced to life in prison in the slaying of a black couple shot in what prosecutors say was a skinhead initiation rite. A Wilmington, N.C., jury took 1 1/2 hours to decide on the penalty for 23-year-old Malcolm Wright, who was found guilty May 2 of murdering Jackie Burden and Michael James.
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NEWS
December 16, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In James Burmeister's world, a spider web tattoo was like a soldier's combat medal, a sign that the bearer had passed a crucial test, had proved his mettle on the field of battle. Barely 20 years of age and on his first Army posting, the gangling private had not yet seen combat. No ribbons hung from his scrawny chest.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
A racist former paratrooper who gunned down a black couple on the street was sentenced to life in prison without parole Thursday after a lone juror held out against the death penalty. Under state law, Judge Coy Brewer had to impose two life terms on former Army Pfc. James Burmeister II because the jury could not unanimously decide on a sentence. Burmeister, 21, of Thompson, Pa., was convicted last week of murder and conspiracy in the 1995 slayings of Jackie Burden, 27, and Michael James, 36.
NEWS
June 10, 1996 | From Associated Press
Song, tears and laughter filled Matthews Murkland Presbyterian Church on Sunday as services were held for the first time since a nearby sanctuary was destroyed by fire. "To whoever started this fire, it took you about $1.50 worth of gas and two boxes of matches to destroy a building," the Rev. Larry Hill said during an emotional sermon to an overflow crowd of more than 200 worshipers, most of them black. "What you don't know is that all you destroyed was a building.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Army, shocked by last week's arrest of two openly white-supremacist paratroopers in the murder of a black couple near Ft. Bragg, N.C., launched a new inquiry Tuesday to determine the extent to which soldiers are participating in hate groups. The investigation, to be conducted by the Army inspector general, was announced by Army Secretary Togo D. West Jr. after he conferred with Defense Secretary William J. Perry and Gen. Dennis J. Reimer, the Army chief of staff.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
A racist former paratrooper who gunned down a black couple on the street was sentenced to life in prison without parole Thursday after a lone juror held out against the death penalty. Under state law, Judge Coy Brewer had to impose two life terms on former Army Pfc. James Burmeister II because the jury could not unanimously decide on a sentence. Burmeister, 21, of Thompson, Pa., was convicted last week of murder and conspiracy in the 1995 slayings of Jackie Burden, 27, and Michael James, 36.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Army offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of vandals who painted swastikas on the doors of eight barracks rooms, six of which belonged to black members of the Army Special Forces at Ft. Bragg, N.C. The other two rooms were unoccupied. The incident was the latest example of extremist activity at Ft. Bragg and prompted human rights activists to urge Defense Secretary William J. Perry to ban hate-group members from the military.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 13-year-old white girl was arrested Monday on charges that she set fire to a black church building in Charlotte, N.C., and police elsewhere questioned three young men about two fires in Texas--the most recent of more than 50 suspected arsons at black churches.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | from Times Wire Services
Three Marines showed no remorse as they were booked on charges that they beat a gay man apparently because of President Clinton's push to lift the ban on homosexuals in the military, police said Monday. "They were saying . . . they wish (homosexuals) were all dead and they're not ashamed of it," said Ed Gibson, the Wilmington police desk sergeant when the Marines were brought to the station after the attack early Saturday. Three Marine lance corporals--Colin C. Hunt, 20, Patric G.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | MICHAEL A. FLETCHER, THE WASHINGTON POST
A former Army paratrooper and member of a white supremacist group was convicted Thursday in the murders of a black couple that prompted a worldwide investigation into the level of extremist activity within the Army's ranks. A North Carolina jury found James N. Burmeister, 21, guilty of two counts of first-degree murder and conspiracy in the December 1995 shooting deaths of Jackie Burden, 22, and Michael James, 36. The couple was shot at close range while strolling down a dirt road near Ft.
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A black sergeant has been ordered discharged from a U.S. Army special forces unit for painting red swastikas on barracks doors at Ft. Bragg, N.C., last summer, base officials said. The vandalism took place in the early morning hours of July 16, when someone spray-painted two-foot-high swastikas on the doors to eight rooms inside the barracks. Six of the rooms were occupied by black soldiers. Sgt. Robert L. Washington, 31, has denied painting the symbols.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | Reuters
Army investigators at Ft. Bragg, N.C., are investigating whether a black soldier may have been responsible for painting swastikas on the doors to black soldiers' rooms, a defense official said Wednesday. "There have been no arrests as far as I know. But I understand that the investigation is pointing toward an African American," said the official, who asked not to be identified. Army spokesmen at the Pentagon and Ft.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Army offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of vandals who painted swastikas on the doors of eight barracks rooms, six of which belonged to black members of the Army Special Forces at Ft. Bragg, N.C. The other two rooms were unoccupied. The incident was the latest example of extremist activity at Ft. Bragg and prompted human rights activists to urge Defense Secretary William J. Perry to ban hate-group members from the military.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Army ordered 350 Special Forces troops restricted to their compound Tuesday after superiors found swastikas painted on the doors of rooms occupied by black soldiers in a Special Forces barracks at Ft. Bragg, N.C. Army officials said that the swastikas, drawn in red brush-strokes, were discovered early Tuesday morning after apparently being painted between 3 a.m. and 6 a.m., the time most troops are expected to rise. The incident was the second race-related action at Ft.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 13-year-old white girl was arrested Monday on charges that she set fire to a black church building in Charlotte, N.C., and police elsewhere questioned three young men about two fires in Texas--the most recent of more than 50 suspected arsons at black churches.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Army ordered 350 Special Forces troops restricted to their compound Tuesday after superiors found swastikas painted on the doors of rooms occupied by black soldiers in a Special Forces barracks at Ft. Bragg, N.C. Army officials said that the swastikas, drawn in red brush-strokes, were discovered early Tuesday morning after apparently being painted between 3 a.m. and 6 a.m., the time most troops are expected to rise. The incident was the second race-related action at Ft.
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A black sergeant has been ordered discharged from a U.S. Army special forces unit for painting red swastikas on barracks doors at Ft. Bragg, N.C., last summer, base officials said. The vandalism took place in the early morning hours of July 16, when someone spray-painted two-foot-high swastikas on the doors to eight rooms inside the barracks. Six of the rooms were occupied by black soldiers. Sgt. Robert L. Washington, 31, has denied painting the symbols.
NEWS
June 10, 1996 | From Associated Press
Song, tears and laughter filled Matthews Murkland Presbyterian Church on Sunday as services were held for the first time since a nearby sanctuary was destroyed by fire. "To whoever started this fire, it took you about $1.50 worth of gas and two boxes of matches to destroy a building," the Rev. Larry Hill said during an emotional sermon to an overflow crowd of more than 200 worshipers, most of them black. "What you don't know is that all you destroyed was a building.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In James Burmeister's world, a spider web tattoo was like a soldier's combat medal, a sign that the bearer had passed a crucial test, had proved his mettle on the field of battle. Barely 20 years of age and on his first Army posting, the gangling private had not yet seen combat. No ribbons hung from his scrawny chest.
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