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Hate Crimes Southern California

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NEWS
August 2, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hate crimes against Asians increased sharply in Southern California last year, more than in any other region in the country, according to a new study scheduled for release Tuesday. Reported cases of anti-Asian violence in 1995 in Southern California increased nearly 80%, to 113 from 63 the previous year, according to the Washington-based civil rights group National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium.
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NEWS
August 2, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hate crimes against Asians increased sharply in Southern California last year, more than in any other region in the country, according to a new study scheduled for release Tuesday. Reported cases of anti-Asian violence in 1995 in Southern California increased nearly 80%, to 113 from 63 the previous year, according to the Washington-based civil rights group National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium.
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NEWS
July 23, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reputed white supremacist facing federal charges of possessing explosive devices told federal agents that he built pipe bombs to sell for a profit and to "rip off" black and Latino drug dealers, according to an affidavit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | JIM NEWTON and JOCELYN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As they were charging eight suspected white supremacists with federal weapons offenses 12 days ago, federal agents also turned up evidence that a Saugus couple may have supplied some hate group members with weapons, according to sources and five search warrants filed Monday. According to the warrants, agents searched two locations connected to Christopher James Berwick and Rebecca Berwick. At a mobile home park in Saugus, the agents seized 11 firearms, a silencer and other gun parts.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reputed white supremacist facing federal charges of possessing explosive devices told federal agents that he built pipe bombs to sell for a profit, according to an affidavit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | JIM NEWTON and JOCELYN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As they were charging eight suspected white supremacists with federal weapons offenses 12 days ago, federal agents also turned up evidence that a Saugus couple may have supplied some hate group members with weapons, according to sources and five search warrants filed Monday. According to the warrants, agents searched two locations connected to Christopher James Berwick and Rebecca Berwick. At a mobile home park in Saugus, the agents seized 11 firearms, a silencer and other gun parts.
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | DAVID FREED, This article was reported by Times staff writers Michael Connelly, David Freed and Sonia Nazario. It was written by Freed
Hitler was a saint. The Holocaust never happened. Jews are the children of Satan and are destroying the United States along with other "mud people"--African-Americans, Asians, Latinos--anyone not descended from Anglo-Saxon stock. Such are the bizarre fomentations of the shadowy, often violent world known as white supremacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1994 | BRENDA DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thousand Oaks school officials on Friday found racist flyers stuffed into lockers at Westlake High School, less than a month after the same literature was distributed to hundreds of lockers at Simi Valley High School. Similar flyers have been found hidden in products at stores from Thousand Oaks to southern Los Angeles, officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1990 | BRUCE G. IWASAKI, Bruce G. Iwasaki is a member of the National Coalition for Redress and R e parations in Los Angeles. and
Late last month, the Japanese minister of justice, Seiroku Kajiyama, compared prostitution in Tokyo to black people moving into white neighborhoods in America. Both, he said, "ruin the atmosphere." Obviously, the rulers of Japan have learned nothing from similar remarks that embarrassed their nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 22-year-old Chinese American was charged Thursday with sending threatening Internet e-mail messages to scores of Latino faculty members at Cal State L.A. and to others at universities, corporations and government agencies across the country. Kingman Quon, who lives with his parents in Corona, has agreed to plead guilty to seven counts of violating a federal hate crime law, prosecutors said. He faces up to seven years in prison. Quon's lawyer said his client was remorseful about his actions.
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | DAVID FREED, This article was reported by Times staff writers Michael Connelly, David Freed and Sonia Nazario. It was written by Freed
Hitler was a saint. The Holocaust never happened. Jews are the children of Satan and are destroying the United States along with other "mud people"--African-Americans, Asians, Latinos--anyone not descended from Anglo-Saxon stock. Such are the bizarre fomentations of the shadowy, often violent world known as white supremacy.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reputed white supremacist facing federal charges of possessing explosive devices told federal agents that he built pipe bombs to sell for a profit and to "rip off" black and Latino drug dealers, according to an affidavit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reputed white supremacist facing federal charges of possessing explosive devices told federal agents that he built pipe bombs to sell for a profit, according to an affidavit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victims of hate crimes across Southern California denounced the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down a Minnesota law banning cross-burning Monday, but prosecutors said that the decision is not likely to thwart their efforts to convict perpetrators. Because California's cross-burning statute is more narrowly drawn than the St. Paul, Minn., ordinance invalidated by the high court, most legal experts predicted that it might survive under the new standards.
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