Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHats
IN THE NEWS

Hats

TRAVEL
October 23, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Question: Please clarify the Transportation Security Administration's limitations on volume of fluids allowed in a single container to be carried onboard in the 1-quart plastic bag, which raised the issue of 3-1-1 (3 ounces, 1-quart bag, 1 bag per person). I was in Italy and wanted to bring back a vial of Modena's famed balsamic vinegar. In Europe, volume is expressed in metric, and the smallest container I could find was 100 milliliters, which is 3.3 ounces. I chose not to bring anything back.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1997 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sheri Schrier is the queen of head-wear handouts. Crocheted caps, painted hats, beanies bearing smiling cats. The kids all smile, some even laugh, when Schrier gives a happy hat. Schrier, of Rolling Hills Estates, has been giving sick youngsters something to smile about since she started Happy Hats for Kids six years ago. Her nonprofit group visits local hospitals that treat some of the 16,000 children in California who have cancer and AIDS and gives them handmade hats and some hope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1998 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just moments into the game when Susan Sandell heard a roar from the Abbey restaurant, a block from her Seal Beach apartment. She knew immediately that one of two things had happened: "Either [Mark] McGwire hit a home run," she said, "or they got a new shipment of hats." As it turned out, McGwire hit the homer in the first inning, matching the record Roger Maris set in 1961 and sending the bar-full of fans into a fit of cheering and toasting. The hats arrived about 15 minutes later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton fancied a fashionable straw hat for a White House event, one phone call to the San Fernando Valley did the trick. Searching for a traditional English bowler took comedian and former talk show host Arsenio Hall to the same place--Constance Jolcuvar's hat shop in Calabasas. Jolcuvar, an old-fashioned hat maker, has been appointed the head milliner for this summer's Olympic Games in Atlanta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1990
Diane M. Wootton Assistant principal, Ventura High School Yes, they are, of course, necessary because of how our population now dresses. We feel that some of the outfits are not appropriate for school. They disrupt the classroom instruction. We sometimes have students who don't wear enough clothing--it's too brief, exposing certain parts of the body, and it's distracting. Our written policy is that dress, grooming or accessories "considered unsafe, dangerous or a health hazard, containing offensive or obscene symbols, signs or slogans degrading to any cultural, religious or ethnic values, containing language or symbols oriented towards sex, drugs, violence, alcohol or tobacco are not allowed on campus or at any school-sponsored events."
NEWS
March 24, 2005 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
Crowns. They wear crowns. Big, beautiful elaborate hats bejeweled with imported crystals that dance in the sunlight streaming through stained glass windows. Fancy creations abloom with iridescent plumes, oversized roses and sweet violets, perfect for pulpit or pew. Elegant chapeaux trimmed with fur, Belgian lace or flat-back pearls that stand out nonpareil in church.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1995 | GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Commercial plumber Dave Fortney couldn't stand the dingy ring-around-the-brim his baseball caps would develop after a hard day's work or an outing on his boat, but he also hated the way the caps came out of the laundry limp and battered. When one of his favorite caps came out especially mangled, he decided enough was enough.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | JOANNA DENDEL
Hats by Ahadi: 733 N. La Brea Ave; 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday or by appointment, (213) 965-0639. Ahadi's hats follow fashion trends. This season he trims them with tassels and crusader crosses. Prices: $45-$300. The Hat Gallery: 5632 Melrose Ave.; 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, (213) 463-3163. Elizabeth Marcel's hats have turn-of-the-century crowns and distinctive antique trims. Prices: $175-$250. Imolden Grey: 2409 Main St., Santa Monica; 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
TRAVEL
October 3, 2010 | By Jay Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although they're huddled close, the tens of thousands of cattle are remarkably quiet. The cowboys traversing the blocks-long boardwalk above hear only the occasional bellow below. In familiar hats, jeans and boots, the men ? and some women ? make their way toward the bustling auction arena. Some come to the Oklahoma National Stock Yards just to watch the bustle of cattle, but most come, checkbook in hand, to bid and to buy. This has been going on in Oklahoma City for 100 years, since cattlemen began bringing their critters to market here.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | WILLIAM KISSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you think men's hats begin and end with baseball caps, think again. In the clubsand on the street, pork-pie beanies, berets, jester's hats and "Cat in the Hat" hats are edging out the ubiquitous logo-stitched baseball cap. Rave-goers are partial to the "Sleepy Soul," a foot-long knit cap with a shoestring in place of a tassel sold at a new street-fashion shop called 555 Soul. At Stussy Union, fur golf caps, two-tone beanies and the shop's own "Dr. Stuss" striped knit ski caps are bestsellers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|