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Hatty Jones

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July 10, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Who says blonds have more fun? When it comes to child heroines, there's nothing like red on the head. Just ask Annie, or Pippi Longstocking, or drop by a theater near you and meet the vivacious young star of "Madeline." Adapted from several of Ludwig Bemelmans' enduring children's books about a fearless orphan at a French girls school, "Madeline" plays more like a pilot for a TV series than a stand-alone feature.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | David Gritten
Hatty Jones, a 10-year-old English girl with a round, expressive face and big brown eyes, stars as Madeline, the smallest of the "12 little girls in two straight lines." She had virtually no experience before landing this major role, but attends a drama school, the Arts Academy and lives in Muswell Hill, north London. She joined The Times and her co-star, Frances McDormand, for dessert and a three-way conversation. Question: You went to New York for the premiere. What did you think of it?
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | David Gritten
Hatty Jones, a 10-year-old English girl with a round, expressive face and big brown eyes, stars as Madeline, the smallest of the "12 little girls in two straight lines." She had virtually no experience before landing this major role, but attends a drama school, the Arts Academy and lives in Muswell Hill, north London. She joined The Times and her co-star, Frances McDormand, for dessert and a three-way conversation. Question: You went to New York for the premiere. What did you think of it?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Who says blonds have more fun? When it comes to child heroines, there's nothing like red on the head. Just ask Annie, or Pippi Longstocking, or drop by a theater near you and meet the vivacious young star of "Madeline." Adapted from several of Ludwig Bemelmans' enduring children's books about a fearless orphan at a French girls school, "Madeline" plays more like a pilot for a TV series than a stand-alone feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1998
MOVIES "Madeline" brings to the screen Ludwig Bemelman's classic series of books about a tiny schoolgirl. Set in Paris, the film, which opens Friday in general release, features Hatty Jones as the title character and Frances McDormand as Miss Clavel, right, along with Nigel Hawthorne as Lord Covington. MOVIES Mel Gibson and Danny Glover reunite as L.A. police detectives Martin Riggs and Roger Murtaugh in "Lethal Weapon 4."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1999
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are viewing tips: Today--"Art of the Western World: In Our Own Time" (KLCS 2:30-3:30 p.m.) Final installment of art history series looks at American accomplishments, including environmental art, feminist art and works by Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol. Also, "20th Century With Mike Wallace" (HIST 4-5 p.m.) Documentary explains the 1953 discovery of DNA by James Watson and Francis Crick.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Madeline" director Daisy von Scherler Mayer could see it clearly: The world's most beloved French boarding school student, played in the movie by Hatty Jones, and her 11 classmates would wear yellow wool coats during their perambulations through Paris. That was until costume designer Michael Clancy brought her to her senses. "Think about it," Clancy told her. "They'd look like rain slickers." "It was an awful idea," Mayer says. Still, it wasn't entirely without logic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2000 | VALERIE J. NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the news that Chris Columbus has been selected to direct the first "Harry Potter" film, many of the books' countless fans made a collective grimace. Children may have loved "Home Alone" or "Mrs. Doubtfire" but they can't see the connection between the boy wizard who springs from pages laced with subtle humor and the "silly, slapstick" movies the director is known for. Ouch. Adult fans--and there are many--also tend to greet the choice of Columbus with a raised eyebrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | David Gritten, David Gritten is a regular contributor to Calendar
Actresses who win an Oscar usually move swiftly to capitalize on their success. With their agents they seek high-profile, lucrative screen roles to ride the wave of their new-found visibility. For who knows how long it will last? Acting is precarious, especially for women; this year's hot face easily becomes next year's "remember her?" That's how most Oscar-winning actresses react to their triumph. Frances McDormand, it's fair to say, follows another path entirely.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1998
Monsters and natural disasters get all the attention, but there's more to the summer movie lineup. FRIDAY Bulworth. Producer-writer-director Warren Beatty plays an imperiled U.S. senator who becomes involved with young South-Central L.A. resident Halle Berry. (Fox) Clockwatchers. Parker Posey, Lisa Kudrow, Toni Collette and Alanna Ubach are credit-firm temp workers whose bond is threatened by a new arrival. (BMG Independents) French Exit.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1998
Opening Soon An Alan Smithee Film--Burn, Hollywood, Burn. Writer Joe Eszterhas skewers the world of big-budget films in this satirical account of an ill-fated production. (Hollywood) Ayn Rand: A Sense of Life. Sharon Gless narrates and Michael Paxton directs an examination of the author's life, including her Hollywood apprenticeship to Cecil B. DeMille. (Strand) Blues Brothers 2000.
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