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NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 15,000 people marched through the capital of Taiwan to demand the resignation of Premier Hau Pei-tsun, accusing him and intelligence officials of obstructing democracy. The May 9 arrest of a college student and three others accused of advocating an independent Taiwan has sparked daily demonstrations.
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NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 15,000 people marched through the capital of Taiwan to demand the resignation of Premier Hau Pei-tsun, accusing him and intelligence officials of obstructing democracy. The May 9 arrest of a college student and three others accused of advocating an independent Taiwan has sparked daily demonstrations.
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NEWS
May 21, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of demonstrators opposed to military influence in government marched through Taipei on Sunday to protest the selection of Defense Minister Hau Pei-tsun as Taiwan's next prime minister. "Military Rule Is the Nightmare of the People," declared one typical banner carried by the protesters, who came from universities, unions, religious groups and opposition parties. "Down With Individual Dictatorship," declared another.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
The legislature confirmed a top general as Taiwan's new prime minister during a raucous session Tuesday, and hundreds of opponents fought in the streets with police, burned buses and tossed firebombs at government buildings. At least 40 people, including 10 officers, were reported injured. Police detained 10 people in the rioting, which paralyzed downtown traffic for more than 12 hours. Two police officers were hospitalized with serious burns from firebombs, police said.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
The legislature confirmed a top general as Taiwan's new prime minister during a raucous session Tuesday, and hundreds of opponents fought in the streets with police, burned buses and tossed firebombs at government buildings. At least 40 people, including 10 officers, were reported injured. Police detained 10 people in the rioting, which paralyzed downtown traffic for more than 12 hours. Two police officers were hospitalized with serious burns from firebombs, police said.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Opposition politicians screamed, shoved and filibustered to keep Taiwan's prime minister-designate from addressing Parliament to protest what they called military interference in government. Defense Minister Hau Pei-tsun spent most of the day in an anteroom, unable to address the Parliament that must approve his appointment.
NEWS
April 25, 1993
Hau Pei-tsun will be awarded Claremont Graduate School's President's Medal at a ceremony Saturday at 7 p.m. The medal is awarded to individuals of extraordinary distinction in their fields. Hau is a graduate of Whampoa Military Academy and has also studied at the Chinese Army University and at the United States Army Command and General Staff College.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
After decades of promising longevity to buyers of its flagship "Long Life" cigarette brand, Taiwan's government is searching for a new name that makes money but does not mislead. Premier Hau Pei-tsun ordered the government's Tobacco and Wine Monopoly Bureau to "correct" the name of its Long Life brand, by far the most popular brand here. Bureau officials said today that a new name has not been chosen, but they are certain business will be hurt.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
President Lee Teng-hui chose Taiwan's top military official Wednesday to be prime minister in a surprise move that opposition leaders denounced as a setback for democracy. Defense Minister Hau Pei-tsun, the country's only four-star general, said he accepted the offer to head the government during a meeting with the president. Hau, 71, would replace Lee Huan, 73, in about two weeks. "President Lee said the country needs me," Hau said in a television interview. "I thought I should not defy him."
BUSINESS
April 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Earle Ho, a Taiwanese steel executive, was named Thursday to replace David Huang as chairman of Taiwan Aerospace, the firm that may buy up to 40% of McDonnell Douglas' commercial aircraft operations. Ho, 53, chairman of the private Tung Ho Steel Enterprise Corp., is expected to relieve Taiwan Aerospace of political problems blamed on Huang, 72, who resigned Wednesday.
NEWS
May 21, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of demonstrators opposed to military influence in government marched through Taipei on Sunday to protest the selection of Defense Minister Hau Pei-tsun as Taiwan's next prime minister. "Military Rule Is the Nightmare of the People," declared one typical banner carried by the protesters, who came from universities, unions, religious groups and opposition parties. "Down With Individual Dictatorship," declared another.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ruling Nationalist Party, stung by a poor showing in Taiwan's first fully democratic legislative elections, was caught up in political turmoil Monday, with Premier Hau Pei-tsun saying he is willing to resign. Hau, 73, expressed hope that Taiwan "will have an environment of political and social stability," despite political reforms that have weakened the Nationalists' once-unchallengeable grip on power.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Protesters demanding democratic reforms kept up their face-off with riot police in downtown Taipei early today as a peaceful sit-down demonstration entered its fourth day. The government toughened its demands that demonstrators leave, but they responded by drawing increasingly blunt comparisons of their movement to that of student-led pro-democracy protesters in Beijing's Tian An Men Square in spring, 1989.
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