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NEWS
July 10, 1989 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, Special to The Times and Essoyan is a Honolulu-based writer
When his new Japanese landlord told Ryoei Higa to abandon his flourishing lettuce fields to make way for a golf course, the Hawaii farmer had a simple retort: "No can eat golf balls," said the weather-worn 70-year-old, in the plain-spoken pidgin favored in the islands. Higa's quietly stated warning has become a rallying cry for farmers and others who feel threatened by an unprecedented boom in golf course development across the state.
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NEWS
December 4, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reasons are as compelling as the paycheck drawn on a Tokyo bank, as obvious as the miso soup breakfast special at the hotel coffee shop, as dramatic as the U.S. senator with the name Inouye: Commemorating Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor is a complicated affair for Hawaii. Here, 50 years later, in what became the 50th state, oil from the great fight still seeps from the sunken battleship Arizona. Yet bonds with Japan are stronger and more vital here than anywhere else in America.
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BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hotel managers, claiming that disruptions by striking workers have escalated out of control, asked a federal judge Friday to limit picketing to avert "blood in the streets." The judge said no. As Hawaii's first statewide hotel strike marked its seventh day, tempers were wearing thin for everyone involved, especially the tourists unwittingly caught up in the dispute.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hotel managers, claiming that disruptions by striking workers have escalated out of control, asked a federal judge Friday to limit picketing to avert "blood in the streets." The judge said no. As Hawaii's first statewide hotel strike marked its seventh day, tempers were wearing thin for everyone involved, especially the tourists unwittingly caught up in the dispute.
NEWS
December 4, 1988
A decision by the Catholic Church to sell its St. Augustine Church property in the heart of Waikiki has provoked renewed controversy over the continuing buying spree in Hawaii by Japanese investors. Honolulu Bishop Joseph Ferrario announced that the 50,000-square-foot parcel was being sold to Hama Kikaku Co. of Tokyo for $45 million. Diocese offices were besieged with phone calls and clergy and parishioners voiced anger. Ferrario defended his decision.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reasons are as compelling as the paycheck drawn on a Tokyo bank, as obvious as the miso soup breakfast special at the hotel coffee shop, as dramatic as the U.S. senator with the name Inouye: Commemorating Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor is a complicated affair for Hawaii. Here, 50 years later, in what became the 50th state, oil from the great fight still seeps from the sunken battleship Arizona. Yet bonds with Japan are stronger and more vital here than anywhere else in America.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
As anxious homeowners arrived at the Maunawili grade school gymnasium for a protest meeting in late March, they could see the handwriting on the wall--quite literally. There, handwritten on long scrolls of vanilla-colored paper, were the names of scores of familiar enterprises--Central Pacific Bank, Honolulu International Country Club--that had something significant in common: all had Japanese owners.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
Long Beach building contractor Matt Larner was working on an apartment building the other day when a Japanese man drove up, asked who owned the property and if it was for sale. He also asked about the owner of an apartment complex being built next door and wondered if that was for sale as well. "He just drove up out of the blue and wanted to buy these properties," said Larner's wife, Donna, who related the story. "That was pretty nervy of him, if you ask me."
BUSINESS
December 9, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Frank F. Fasi, Honolulu's feisty mayor, has jumped into the fray over the sale of a popular Roman Catholic church to Japanese investors who intend to demolish the building and put up a luxury condominium tower. The ruckus was kicked off when the bishop of Honolulu decided to sell St. Augustine Catholic Church, which is just across the street from Waikiki Beach, for $45 million, despite the opposition of parishioners.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, Special to The Times and Essoyan is a Honolulu-based writer
When his new Japanese landlord told Ryoei Higa to abandon his flourishing lettuce fields to make way for a golf course, the Hawaii farmer had a simple retort: "No can eat golf balls," said the weather-worn 70-year-old, in the plain-spoken pidgin favored in the islands. Higa's quietly stated warning has become a rallying cry for farmers and others who feel threatened by an unprecedented boom in golf course development across the state.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Frank F. Fasi, Honolulu's feisty mayor, has jumped into the fray over the sale of a popular Roman Catholic church to Japanese investors who intend to demolish the building and put up a luxury condominium tower. The ruckus was kicked off when the bishop of Honolulu decided to sell St. Augustine Catholic Church, which is just across the street from Waikiki Beach, for $45 million, despite the opposition of parishioners.
NEWS
December 4, 1988
A decision by the Catholic Church to sell its St. Augustine Church property in the heart of Waikiki has provoked renewed controversy over the continuing buying spree in Hawaii by Japanese investors. Honolulu Bishop Joseph Ferrario announced that the 50,000-square-foot parcel was being sold to Hama Kikaku Co. of Tokyo for $45 million. Diocese offices were besieged with phone calls and clergy and parishioners voiced anger. Ferrario defended his decision.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
Long Beach building contractor Matt Larner was working on an apartment building the other day when a Japanese man drove up, asked who owned the property and if it was for sale. He also asked about the owner of an apartment complex being built next door and wondered if that was for sale as well. "He just drove up out of the blue and wanted to buy these properties," said Larner's wife, Donna, who related the story. "That was pretty nervy of him, if you ask me."
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
As anxious homeowners arrived at the Maunawili grade school gymnasium for a protest meeting in late March, they could see the handwriting on the wall--quite literally. There, handwritten on long scrolls of vanilla-colored paper, were the names of scores of familiar enterprises--Central Pacific Bank, Honolulu International Country Club--that had something significant in common: all had Japanese owners.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
Honolulu Mayor Frank F. Fasi is known as a maverick politician who is not afraid to stoke the fires of controversy. And this week he has lived up to his reputation. In an effort to stem a wild home-buying spree by Japanese investors in the city's luxury neighborhoods in recent months, Fasi sent a bill to the state Legislature seeking to prevent foreign investors from buying residential property throughout Hawaii.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
Honolulu Mayor Frank F. Fasi is known as a maverick politician who is not afraid to stoke the fires of controversy. And this week he has lived up to his reputation. In an effort to stem a wild home-buying spree by Japanese investors in the city's luxury neighborhoods in recent months, Fasi sent a bill to the state Legislature seeking to prevent foreign investors from buying residential property throughout Hawaii.
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