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TRAVEL
April 17, 1988 | PAT DALTON, Dalton is a Denver free-lance writer whose fourth novel, "Close Scrutiny," was published in February by Berkeley.
A crescent of vanilla sand curves invitingly along azure ocean more than a mile in each direction. Except for the palm trees and you, the beach is deserted. Are you shipwrecked on a remote atoll? Not necessarily. This scenario applied to a beach in Kailua on Oahu, half an hour's drive from Waikiki, on a lazy weekday afternoon. Kailua is a prosperous town at the end of the Pali Highway, north across the mountains from Honolulu, a world away from the crowds, high-rises and honky-tonks of Waikiki.
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NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
HONOLULU - When the federal government began parceling out billions of dollars for the new health insurance marketplaces under the Affordable Care Act, President Obama's home state was in an enviable position. Hawaii already had one of the highest insured rates in the nation as the result of a 40-year-old state law requiring employers to provide coverage. The state received more than $205 million in federal money to build a health insurance exchange to serve those still uninsured.
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NEWS
September 2, 1990 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Malina Kaulukukui of El Toro was married 24 years ago on the island of Oahu, friends, relatives and neighbors she had never met carted box after armload of fragrant pikake, plumeria and hibiscus blossoms to her home. "All these people brought flowers over because they had heard from auntie so-and-so who had heard from uncle so-and-so who had heard from a friend that we needed flowers for the wedding," she recalled the other day.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
Federal health officials confirmed that four people on Maui contracted dengue fever over the summer, the first cases of the mosquito-borne disease in Hawaii in more than 50 years, state officials said. Dengue fever is rarely fatal, and the four people confirmed to have had it have recovered. Still, state health officials are urging people in eastern Maui, a sparsely populated area that is largely rain forest, to take precautions and eliminate mosquito breeding grounds.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
Federal health officials confirmed that four people on Maui contracted dengue fever over the summer, the first cases of the mosquito-borne disease in Hawaii in more than 50 years, state officials said. Dengue fever is rarely fatal, and the four people confirmed to have had it have recovered. Still, state health officials are urging people in eastern Maui, a sparsely populated area that is largely rain forest, to take precautions and eliminate mosquito breeding grounds.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
HONOLULU - When the federal government began parceling out billions of dollars for the new health insurance marketplaces under the Affordable Care Act, President Obama's home state was in an enviable position. Hawaii already had one of the highest insured rates in the nation as the result of a 40-year-old state law requiring employers to provide coverage. The state received more than $205 million in federal money to build a health insurance exchange to serve those still uninsured.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atop a wind-swept bluff with an ocean vista that a posh resort would envy, the Waianae Comprehensive Health Clinic on Oahu's leeward coast offers a compelling view of the benefits and limits of the employer mandate--the controversial linchpin of President Clinton's health reform plan. After 20 years under a state law that requires employers to pay part of their workers' health insurance, 96% of Hawaiians enjoy medical insurance, easily the highest percentage of any state.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | Associated Press
Hawaii's health department ordered a homeless shelter's kitchen closed while officials investigated reports that several people who ate its Thanksgiving dinner suffered food poisoning. The state health department planned to test samples of food served to more than 300 people at the Institute for Human Services. Some 40 to 50 people became ill.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
HONOLULU - When the giant kapok and nawa trees that tower over the Queen's Medical Center in downtown Honolulu were planted more than a century ago, Hawaii faced a health crisis. Many on the islands, including the queen who founded the hospital in 1859, feared that native Hawaiians, devastated by smallpox, measles and other illnesses brought by foreigners, were in danger of dying off completely. Today, the people who walk under these trees are some of the healthiest in America.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
As the Hawaii Legislature weighs bills that would make sweeping changes to the state's Obamacare program, the interim director of Hawaii's healthcare exchange on Wednesday laid out a grim financial picture facing the agency. With anemic enrollment by individuals and little interest among small-business employers, the state's nonprofit exchange -- known as the Hawaii Health Connector -- is unlikely to have enough money to pay its bills , even under the best of circumstances, when federal grant money dries up in 2015.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atop a wind-swept bluff with an ocean vista that a posh resort would envy, the Waianae Comprehensive Health Clinic on Oahu's leeward coast offers a compelling view of the benefits and limits of the employer mandate--the controversial linchpin of President Clinton's health reform plan. After 20 years under a state law that requires employers to pay part of their workers' health insurance, 96% of Hawaiians enjoy medical insurance, easily the highest percentage of any state.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Malina Kaulukukui of El Toro was married 24 years ago on the island of Oahu, friends, relatives and neighbors she had never met carted box after armload of fragrant pikake, plumeria and hibiscus blossoms to her home. "All these people brought flowers over because they had heard from auntie so-and-so who had heard from uncle so-and-so who had heard from a friend that we needed flowers for the wedding," she recalled the other day.
TRAVEL
April 17, 1988 | PAT DALTON, Dalton is a Denver free-lance writer whose fourth novel, "Close Scrutiny," was published in February by Berkeley.
A crescent of vanilla sand curves invitingly along azure ocean more than a mile in each direction. Except for the palm trees and you, the beach is deserted. Are you shipwrecked on a remote atoll? Not necessarily. This scenario applied to a beach in Kailua on Oahu, half an hour's drive from Waikiki, on a lazy weekday afternoon. Kailua is a prosperous town at the end of the Pali Highway, north across the mountains from Honolulu, a world away from the crowds, high-rises and honky-tonks of Waikiki.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Nearly 200,000 people have signed up for Obamacare coverage in L.A. County, new state data show. To put that in a national perspective, if the Los Angeles area were a state, it would have the fifth-highest enrollment in the country. It would trail only the rest of California, Florida, New York and Texas. L.A. County had 198,158 enrollees through the end of January. In comparison, Texas posted a total of 207,524. Full coverage: Obamacare takes effect Among other states, Pennsylvania had enrollment of 123,681 through January, and Washington reported 88,945, according to federal data.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
A Republican state lawmaker sued California's health insurance exchange, saying it overstepped its authority by refusing to allow more than 900,000 people to keep their existing health policies. In his suit, state Sen. Ted Gaines (R-Rocklin) said the Covered California exchange violated federal and state laws by requiring participating health plans to cancel policies by Dec. 31 that didn't comply with new requirements of the Affordable Care Act. The issue of cancellations for about 900,000 individual policyholders in California and several million nationwide has sparked widespread criticism of President Obama's healthcare law. Many consumers got new, improved coverage at lower rates as a result of federal premium subsidies.
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