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NEWS
August 19, 1989 | RHONDA BRIGHT
Although it seems like any excuse would do for a luau, such tropical-themed outdoor celebrations should be in full bloom this weekend, because Monday is the 30th anniversary of Hawaii's statehood. With plenty of resources at local party-favor shops and ethnic grocery stores--perhaps catering to the 150,000 estimated Hawaiians in Los Angeles--Angelenos can easily bring a little of the 50th state into their neck of the tropics.
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NEWS
January 1, 2014 | By Jay Jones
The 70 th anniversary of the launch of USS Missouri will be celebrated Feb. 1 at Pearl Harbor, where the famed battleship is berthed as a museum. The ship was christened Jan. 29, 1944, as World War II raged in the Pacific. On the Missouri's deck on Sept. 2, 1945, as it was anchored in Tokyo Bay, the Japanese signed the documents of surrender that ended the war. Actors portraying wartime heroes, including Gen. Douglas MacArthur and Adm. Chester Nimitz, both of whom signed the historic documents for the United States, will participate in “living history” activities at the Oahu landmark.
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NEWS
January 18, 1993 | Reuters
More than 10,000 native Hawaiians converged on Honolulu's Iolani Palace on Sunday in a solemn protest march marking the 100th anniversary of the U.S.-backed overthrow of the islands' last reigning monarch, Queen Liliuokalani. Smaller ceremonies were under way throughout the Pacific island chain in a sign of growing support for local autonomy and even outright secession from the United States. Under orders of Gov.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2010 | By Alana Semuels
In the clear blue water 150 feet down, off Palemano Point on Hawaii's Big Island, Captain Rick Rogers swam along the ocean floor, concentrating on the light white swirls of staghorn reef below him. As tiny bubbles of air escaped from his tank, his black flippers propelled him above the coral, next to schools of reddish mempache and juicy turquoise uhu fish. The scene was breathtaking, but Rogers didn't care about nature. He was looking for man-made objects only: porcelain plates, pieces of cannons, a sunken iron anchor.
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Turn on the radio these days in Hawaii and you are less likely to hear "Tiny Bubbles" than local musicians belting out a "Song of Sovereignty." Another new hit on all-Hawaiian music stations laments the endless wait of one indigenous Hawaiian for his own land and urges listeners to "look to the source, to a new nation."
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans who come here probably know when Pearl Harbor was bombed--or can find out with the flick of a travel brochure. But how many tan-obsessed tourists--groggily extruding themselves from narrow seats in crammed jumbo jets for respites in paradise--know that the last monarch of the sovereign Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown by a group of U.S. sugar planters and businessmen backed by 162 United States Marines? Not many, it seems safe to say.
NEWS
May 9, 1995 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The traditional voyaging canoe Hawaiiloa arrived home Sunday after a 19-day, 2,500-mile journey from the Marquesas, retracing the likely route of the earliest Hawaiian settlers. Its navigators, like their ancestors more than 1,600 years ago, relied on their knowledge of the stars, wind and waves to guide them. The canoe left Hawaii on Feb. 11 for Tahiti and hooked up with several canoes in French Polynesia for the return trip from the Marquesas Islands.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2010 | By Alana Semuels
In the clear blue water 150 feet down, off Palemano Point on Hawaii's Big Island, Captain Rick Rogers swam along the ocean floor, concentrating on the light white swirls of staghorn reef below him. As tiny bubbles of air escaped from his tank, his black flippers propelled him above the coral, next to schools of reddish mempache and juicy turquoise uhu fish. The scene was breathtaking, but Rogers didn't care about nature. He was looking for man-made objects only: porcelain plates, pieces of cannons, a sunken iron anchor.
NEWS
January 1, 2014 | By Jay Jones
The 70 th anniversary of the launch of USS Missouri will be celebrated Feb. 1 at Pearl Harbor, where the famed battleship is berthed as a museum. The ship was christened Jan. 29, 1944, as World War II raged in the Pacific. On the Missouri's deck on Sept. 2, 1945, as it was anchored in Tokyo Bay, the Japanese signed the documents of surrender that ended the war. Actors portraying wartime heroes, including Gen. Douglas MacArthur and Adm. Chester Nimitz, both of whom signed the historic documents for the United States, will participate in “living history” activities at the Oahu landmark.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2001 | Reuters
Asian financial leaders, still struggling with the lingering pain of the 1997 crisis, gather in Hawaii this week ready to unveil progress in stitching together a currency safety net to ward off another regional meltdown. The Asian Development Bank annual meeting in Honolulu from Wednesday to Friday is drawing ministers and central bankers from across Asia, as well as U.S. Treasury Secretary Paul H. O'Neill.
NEWS
May 9, 1995 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The traditional voyaging canoe Hawaiiloa arrived home Sunday after a 19-day, 2,500-mile journey from the Marquesas, retracing the likely route of the earliest Hawaiian settlers. Its navigators, like their ancestors more than 1,600 years ago, relied on their knowledge of the stars, wind and waves to guide them. The canoe left Hawaii on Feb. 11 for Tahiti and hooked up with several canoes in French Polynesia for the return trip from the Marquesas Islands.
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | Reuters
More than 10,000 native Hawaiians converged on Honolulu's Iolani Palace on Sunday in a solemn protest march marking the 100th anniversary of the U.S.-backed overthrow of the islands' last reigning monarch, Queen Liliuokalani. Smaller ceremonies were under way throughout the Pacific island chain in a sign of growing support for local autonomy and even outright secession from the United States. Under orders of Gov.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans who come here probably know when Pearl Harbor was bombed--or can find out with the flick of a travel brochure. But how many tan-obsessed tourists--groggily extruding themselves from narrow seats in crammed jumbo jets for respites in paradise--know that the last monarch of the sovereign Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown by a group of U.S. sugar planters and businessmen backed by 162 United States Marines? Not many, it seems safe to say.
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Turn on the radio these days in Hawaii and you are less likely to hear "Tiny Bubbles" than local musicians belting out a "Song of Sovereignty." Another new hit on all-Hawaiian music stations laments the endless wait of one indigenous Hawaiian for his own land and urges listeners to "look to the source, to a new nation."
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | RHONDA BRIGHT
Although it seems like any excuse would do for a luau, such tropical-themed outdoor celebrations should be in full bloom this weekend, because Monday is the 30th anniversary of Hawaii's statehood. With plenty of resources at local party-favor shops and ethnic grocery stores--perhaps catering to the 150,000 estimated Hawaiians in Los Angeles--Angelenos can easily bring a little of the 50th state into their neck of the tropics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1985
An opportunity to learn about the native bird life, flora, geology and cultural heritage of Hawaii is being offered by the San Diego Natural History Museum in a trip to the islands July 28 to Aug. 10. The Hawaii Natural History Expedition itinerary includes Waimea Canyon and Kokee State Park on Kauai, a sailing cruise to Molokini Island, the Pacific Tropical Botanical Garden and the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.
NEWS
September 10, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
Reporting from Ko Olina, Hawaii - The new Aulani hotel on Oahu sets out to replace the clichés of tiki torches, totem poles, bamboo furniture and tacky luaus with a resort that celebrates Hawaii's history, traditions and cultures sprinkled with just a small dose of Disney's trademark pixie dust. Although this premise seems more than just a bit ironic for a company that has built its brand on fairytale fantasy, Disney manages to pull it off with style, grace and beauty, resulting in a modern Hawaiian resort that delivers on its promise and its considerable marquee name.
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