Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHawaii Industry
IN THE NEWS

Hawaii Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 27, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silence the ukuleles! Cap that bottle of No. 15 sun-block lotion. Blot out the image of grass-skirt dancers silhouetted against the sunset. Some people around here think that it's time to take Hawaii seriously. High technology and scientific research are the new icons for the future of Paradise, they say, not beach bumming and resort development. The grand vision is of diversifying Hawaii's tourist-clogged economy with clean, utopian workshops.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 27, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silence the ukuleles! Cap that bottle of No. 15 sun-block lotion. Blot out the image of grass-skirt dancers silhouetted against the sunset. Some people around here think that it's time to take Hawaii seriously. High technology and scientific research are the new icons for the future of Paradise, they say, not beach bumming and resort development. The grand vision is of diversifying Hawaii's tourist-clogged economy with clean, utopian workshops.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 9, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems like a far-fetched idea: escape the traffic, smog and crime of Orange County and run away to some tropical island. Fine for a retiree or a beach bum. But an entire business operation? Economic development officials in Maui, Hawaii, say there are practical as well as pleasurable reasons to set up a business on the island best known for its tourist trade. Maui, they say, is at the center of the Pacific Rim economies of the western United States and Asia.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems like a far-fetched idea: escape the traffic, smog and crime of Orange County and run away to some tropical island. Fine for a retiree or a beach bum. But an entire business operation? Economic development officials in Maui, Hawaii, say there are practical as well as pleasurable reasons to set up a business on the island best known for its tourist trade. Maui, they say, is at the center of the Pacific Rim economies of the western United States and Asia.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1987 | RICHARD SATRAN, Reuters
Hawaii hopes to change its image to include pinstripes along with grass skirts in an ambitious development program that aims to replace Hong Kong as the free-market hub of Pacific trade. The 50th state is positioning itself to gain business when Hong Kong reverts to China's political control in 1992, Roger Ulveling, head of the state's Department of Business and Economic Development, said in an interview during a recent visit to New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Helen Matthew Robinson, 91, owner of Niihau Island and Ranch--home to the last all-Hawaiian community--died Wednesday in Makaweli, Hawaii. The cause of death was not given. A native of Berkeley, the matriarch was married to Lester Robinson from 1937 until his death in 1969. The Robinson family purchased the private island and ranch from the Hawaiian monarchy in 1864, and moved there from New Zealand. The family founded Gay & Robinson Sugar Co.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1999
* The head count for Hawaii's top industry--tourism--fell 1.9% last year to 6.7 million, the first annual decline since 1993. But officials said the drop was offset by longer stays in the islands. The continuing Asian economic crisis led to a 10.8% decrease in arrivals from the Asia-Pacific region. But the nearly 2.5 million people who did come increased their length of stay 3.1%. * *Ater more than 300 years in business, Tokyu Department Store Co.'
BUSINESS
May 31, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
It was only four years ago that Hawaii's tourism industry was in such a rut that state leaders turned to its most famous native son -- President Obama -- for help. But things are looking sunny in the Aloha state, which is on pace to break last year's visitor and tourism spending records. For the first four months of 2013, Hawaii has welcomed an average of 23,300 visitors a day, a 6.1% increase over the same period last year, according to the Hawaii Tourism Authority. So far this year, tourists have spent an average of $42 million a day, a 6.3% increase over the same period last year, the tourism authority said.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
The rebound of Hawaii's tourism industry continued in January as the Aloha State enjoyed a record $1.345 billion in visitor spending. The spending total was a 14% increase from the same month in January 2011 and the best one-month total on record, surpassing the December 2011 peak of $1.298 billion. Tourism officials in the state attributed the new record to a 7.7% increase in total arrivals, to 643,616 visitors, and a 5% increase in spending, an increase from an average of $183 per person per day in January 2011 to $192 in January 2012.
MAGAZINE
October 27, 2002 | Lisa Leff
In many ways, the influx of Hawaiians to Las Vegas and Clark County says more about Hawaii than it does about Las Vegas. Like Vegas, the 50th state has its own anomalous economy, one driven almost exclusively by tourism and the trade of its limited real estate.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1987 | RICHARD SATRAN, Reuters
Hawaii hopes to change its image to include pinstripes along with grass skirts in an ambitious development program that aims to replace Hong Kong as the free-market hub of Pacific trade. The 50th state is positioning itself to gain business when Hong Kong reverts to China's political control in 1992, Roger Ulveling, head of the state's Department of Business and Economic Development, said in an interview during a recent visit to New York.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1993 | From Associated Press
HAL Inc., the parent company of Hawaiian Airlines, filed for protection from creditors Tuesday under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. In making the announcement, HAL said the Chapter 11 filing will help it complete a restructuring plan. Company officials said the filing will not disrupt its air carrier service, but it intends to further reduce annual expenses by $6.5 million by cutting about 150 employees.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
As a safety precaution, more than 1,900 aging McDonnell Douglas airliners should have critical parts replaced or modified at a cost of about $563 million, with most of the work being done over the next 10 years, a government-industry task force said Monday. The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to begin the process of issuing repair orders for 1,153 U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|