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Hawaii Labor

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NEWS
March 4, 1990 | Associated Press
Thousands of workers at some of Hawaii's biggest hotels walked off the job Saturday, leaving some guests without fresh sheets and towels and otherwise disrupting the state's $6-billion-a-year tourist industry. Many hotels were forced to cut back on meal and room services as managers scrambled to take the places of strikers.
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NEWS
January 20, 1992 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came from Mexico looking for work, any kind of work, from cotton fields in Arkansas to tomato farms in California. But when Ramon Soto and 10 other veteran farm workers showed up at Los Angeles International Airport with their duffel bags, and wearing their unofficial wayfarer's uniform of baseball caps or cowboy hats, old coats and scuffed boots, they boarded a plane Friday for a new destination in their immigrant odyssey: Hawaii.
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NEWS
January 20, 1992 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came from Mexico looking for work, any kind of work, from cotton fields in Arkansas to tomato farms in California. But when Ramon Soto and 10 other veteran farm workers showed up at Los Angeles International Airport with their duffel bags, and wearing their unofficial wayfarer's uniform of baseball caps or cowboy hats, old coats and scuffed boots, they boarded a plane Friday for a new destination in their immigrant odyssey: Hawaii.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | Associated Press
Thousands of workers at some of Hawaii's biggest hotels walked off the job Saturday, leaving some guests without fresh sheets and towels and otherwise disrupting the state's $6-billion-a-year tourist industry. Many hotels were forced to cut back on meal and room services as managers scrambled to take the places of strikers.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1999 | Times Wire Services
The government of Venezuela sued major U.S. cigarette makers in an effort to recover the public health-care costs of treating sick smokers. The lawsuit, filed in Miami-Dade County Circuit Court in Florida, named 20 tobacco companies, affiliated companies and industry institutions and seeks billions of dollars in damages, said Steven Marks, an attorney representing Venezuela. Philip Morris Cos., the largest U.S. cigarette maker, said it will vigorously defend the lawsuit.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A statewide public teachers' strike shut 180,000 children out of their classrooms Thursday and crippled the University of Hawaii's 10 campuses in the most far-reaching walkout ever in American education. "It is the first time, in my knowledge, that an entire state system, from kindergarten to graduate school, has gone on strike simultaneously," said Bruce S. Cooper, a professor at Fordham University's Graduate School of Education in New York City who specializes in school labor issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2006 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles-based labor contractor must pay nearly $300,000 in fines and back wages for allegedly deceiving and underpaying 88 Thai workers it sent to Hawaii to harvest onions and pineapples, the Labor Department said Monday. Federal investigators also found that Global Horizons Inc. illegally deducted wages for housing and food, and may not have paid for the workers' transportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1999 | JEAN CHRISTENSEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hawaii turns 40 this weekend, and like others that age it's in a midlife crisis. On Aug. 21, 1959, when President Eisenhower welcomed the islands as America's 50th state, spirits were high and confident. Sugar was king, and a second boom industry, tourism, had just dawned with the arrival a few weeks earlier of the first commercial jetliner at Honolulu's airport, an event that brought out lei-bearing crowds.
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