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NEWS
January 16, 1991
RACISM FLAP: A college student who dropped out after a professor suggested Hawaii would be better off without him has returned to the University of Hawaii and filed a grievance. "Once I got over to the mainland, I realized that it's just not right that a professor should do that," said Joey Carter, a senior who will resume his studies this semester. The Louisiana native had written a column in the school newspaper in September lamenting "Caucasian-bashing" in Hawaii.
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NEWS
December 26, 1994 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ben Cayetano remembers standing on the sidewalk, peering into campaign headquarters as his candidate, the lanky Jack Burns, leaped on a table to celebrate his election as governor. That was in 1962, after Cayetano had cast his first vote. Born in Hawaii, the son of an immigrant waiter from the Philippines, he was working in a dead-end job after nearly flunking out of high school. "In those days," he recalls, "I never met a Caucasian who wasn't a boss."
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NEWS
December 26, 1994 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ben Cayetano remembers standing on the sidewalk, peering into campaign headquarters as his candidate, the lanky Jack Burns, leaped on a table to celebrate his election as governor. That was in 1962, after Cayetano had cast his first vote. Born in Hawaii, the son of an immigrant waiter from the Philippines, he was working in a dead-end job after nearly flunking out of high school. "In those days," he recalls, "I never met a Caucasian who wasn't a boss."
NEWS
January 16, 1991
RACISM FLAP: A college student who dropped out after a professor suggested Hawaii would be better off without him has returned to the University of Hawaii and filed a grievance. "Once I got over to the mainland, I realized that it's just not right that a professor should do that," said Joey Carter, a senior who will resume his studies this semester. The Louisiana native had written a column in the school newspaper in September lamenting "Caucasian-bashing" in Hawaii.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Republican may knock an incumbent Democrat out of the U.S. Senate, and the prospect has both parties pulling out all the stops in the campaign. "You can expect to see Bush, Quayle, the entire Cabinet, Mrs. Bush and Millie the dog in Hawaii if the race is really close," said Anita Dunn, communications director for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. She was only half joking. The contest between U.S. Rep. Patricia Saiki and Sen. Daniel K. Akaka is deadly serious for both parties.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2010 | By Alana Semuels
Julia Allen and her husband Mike Palcic -- or "Big Cheese," as he's called on his business card -- have run for office on Oahu on the Republican ticket more than 10 times. Forget the fact that neither has ever won. They're determined to keep running for office in one of the most left-leaning states in the union. "I only lose if I quit," said Allen, who received one-fifth of the vote in her 2008 race for state representative of the 20th District of Oahu. She spent months banging on doors, asking neighbors for votes, but people weren't much interested -- her opponent was the speaker of the Hawaii House of Representatives.
OPINION
March 17, 2002 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ, Gregory Rodriguez, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the New America Foundation.
For U.S. Latinos, more than two-thirds of whom are either immigrants or the children of immigrants, the past decade has been a period of firsts. Every week or so, it seems, there is a story about the first Latino to do this or that. But the cultural significance of these history-making feats is not always profound. Actually, it's mostly skin deep. Last Tuesday, Tony Sanchez, a $600-million oilman who traces his Southwestern roots to 18th-century Spain, made history by defeating Dan Morales, a third-generation Mexican American former state attorney general, to win the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in Texas.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
HONOLULU - In primaries across the country - in Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi and other states - Republicans are locked in a heart-and-soul battle between purists and pragmatists clashing over what it means to represent the party, its philosophy and core values. Here in Hawaii there's a similar fight over power and purpose, but this one is between Democrats. It's a fight for a U.S. Senate seat, a rare enough prize in a state that has elected just six people senator since statehood in 1959.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lost Kingdom Hawaii's Last Queen, the Sugar Kings, and America's First Imperial Adventure Julia Flynn Siler Atlantic Monthly Press: 416 pp., $30 Queen Lili'uokalani is the focus but not the sole subject of "Lost Kingdom," journalist Julia Flynn Siler's well-researched, nicely contextualized history of events leading to the U.S. annexation of Hawaii in 1898. Born in 1838, 50 years after white explorers first arrived on the islands, Lili'u (as she preferred to be called)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian and Michael A. Memoli, Los Angeles Times
When Daniel K. Inouye was 17, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. An aspiring surgeon, he spent much of the next week helping care for the wounded at an elementary school in his native Honolulu. He wanted to enlist immediately but couldn't. Japanese Americans were classified as "enemy aliens. " Two years later, once restrictions were lifted in 1943, he joined the Army's 442nd Regimental Combat Team, whose motto was "Go for broke. " PHOTOS:  Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii The Japanese American soldiers became the most decorated unit in U.S. history.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Republican may knock an incumbent Democrat out of the U.S. Senate, and the prospect has both parties pulling out all the stops in the campaign. "You can expect to see Bush, Quayle, the entire Cabinet, Mrs. Bush and Millie the dog in Hawaii if the race is really close," said Anita Dunn, communications director for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. She was only half joking. The contest between U.S. Rep. Patricia Saiki and Sen. Daniel K. Akaka is deadly serious for both parties.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brown-skinned Hawaiians grumble about white-skinned bosses. Filipino laborers lament Japanese bureaucrats. And a popular Portuguese comedian pokes fun at them all--to nightclub patrons from all over the world. "We have Caucasians filing race-discrimination cases, and we have Hawaiians filing race-discrimination cases," said Linda C. Tseu, executive director of the Hawaii Civil Rights Commission. "It's across the board."
NATIONAL
July 13, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
For decades it was the pride of Waikiki, a mammoth outdoor saltwater swimming pool where athletes and movie stars came to cavort and Hawaiian kids and tourist kids from the mainland took swimming lessons. But for the last 24 years, the once-proud Waikiki War Memorial Natatorium has been something else: a source of political controversy, an off-limits relic from the past, an eyesore.
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