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NEWS
January 18, 1993 | Reuters
More than 10,000 native Hawaiians converged on Honolulu's Iolani Palace on Sunday in a solemn protest march marking the 100th anniversary of the U.S.-backed overthrow of the islands' last reigning monarch, Queen Liliuokalani. Smaller ceremonies were under way throughout the Pacific island chain in a sign of growing support for local autonomy and even outright secession from the United States. Under orders of Gov.
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NEWS
January 18, 1993 | Reuters
More than 10,000 native Hawaiians converged on Honolulu's Iolani Palace on Sunday in a solemn protest march marking the 100th anniversary of the U.S.-backed overthrow of the islands' last reigning monarch, Queen Liliuokalani. Smaller ceremonies were under way throughout the Pacific island chain in a sign of growing support for local autonomy and even outright secession from the United States. Under orders of Gov.
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NEWS
July 22, 1992 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Turn on the radio these days in Hawaii and you are less likely to hear "Tiny Bubbles" than local musicians belting out a "Song of Sovereignty." Another new hit on all-Hawaiian music stations laments the endless wait of one indigenous Hawaiian for his own land and urges listeners to "look to the source, to a new nation."
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans who come here probably know when Pearl Harbor was bombed--or can find out with the flick of a travel brochure. But how many tan-obsessed tourists--groggily extruding themselves from narrow seats in crammed jumbo jets for respites in paradise--know that the last monarch of the sovereign Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown by a group of U.S. sugar planters and businessmen backed by 162 United States Marines? Not many, it seems safe to say.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans who come here probably know when Pearl Harbor was bombed--or can find out with the flick of a travel brochure. But how many tan-obsessed tourists--groggily extruding themselves from narrow seats in crammed jumbo jets for respites in paradise--know that the last monarch of the sovereign Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown by a group of U.S. sugar planters and businessmen backed by 162 United States Marines? Not many, it seems safe to say.
TRAVEL
October 1, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
One speaks literally when saying that Honolulu's Kapiolani Park is fit for a king. About 100 years ago, before the islands were annexed by the United States, the tree-studded, 300-acre greensward was the private preserve of ruling royalty of the Kingdom of Hawaii. The royal family, after seeing public parks in Europe and the United States, decided to give the land to the people late in the 19th Century.
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Turn on the radio these days in Hawaii and you are less likely to hear "Tiny Bubbles" than local musicians belting out a "Song of Sovereignty." Another new hit on all-Hawaiian music stations laments the endless wait of one indigenous Hawaiian for his own land and urges listeners to "look to the source, to a new nation."
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