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BUSINESS
March 16, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The growth of Orange County's international business community not only expands trade, it also exposes executives and workers to new and different ways of doing things. Employees of South Coast Acura in Costa Mesa received a lesson in cultural diversity Tuesday as they watched a traditional Hawaiian purification and blessing ceremony held to help ease the dealership's move into its new facility.
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TRAVEL
April 21, 2013 | By Julia Flynn Siler
HONOLULU - He's known as the Woody Guthrie of Hawaiian music, a virtuoso ukulele player who's helped to introduce new generations to music that might otherwise be lost. But on the autumn morning I met up with Eddie Kamae, few people seemed to recognize the octogenarian wearing Levis and a blue work shirt. It was just after 9 a.m., and Eddie was eating a bowl of vanilla ice cream at the Wailana Coffee House in Waikiki. He had risen before sunrise to pray, read the paper and watch the sky lighten from the nearby apartment building where he and his wife, Myrna, have lived for nearly half a century.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2009 | Claire Noland
George Na'ope, a guardian of native Hawaiian culture who taught traditional hula dance and chanting to generations of students and introduced the ancient art forms to new audiences, has died. He was 81. Na'ope, who in 2006 was honored with a National Heritage Fellowship award by the National Endowment for the Arts, died Oct. 26 at his home in Hilo, Hawaii, after battling cancer. His death was announced by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Na'ope (pronounced nah-OH-peh) co-founded the Merrie Monarch Festival, a celebration of hula held annually since the early 1960s in Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2010 | Mcclatchy-Tribune News Service
Dorothy "Auntie Dottie" Thompson, who helped found and direct the Merrie Monarch Festival, Hawaii's most prestigious showcase for hula, died March 19 in Hilo after a long illness. She was 88. Thompson and George Na'ope co-founded the festival in 1964 with the intention of boosting tourism and cultural pride. Na'ope died in October at 81. The weeklong Merrie Monarch Festival, in Hilo's Edith Kanaka'ole Tennis Stadium, celebrates its 47th anniversary this year beginning April 4. Under Thompson's determined leadership, the festival remained little changed or modernized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Nona Beamer, a noted authority on Hawaiian culture and matriarch of the musical Beamer family, has died. She was 84. Beamer, a songwriter, performer, hula teacher and author, died in her sleep early Thursday at her home on Maui, said Mark Nelson, administrator of Aloha Music Camp, which Beamer founded and operated with her son Keola, a Grammy-nominated slack-key guitar artist. Nelson said he and Keola Beamer were on tour, which has now been canceled.
TRAVEL
August 20, 2000 | EILEEN OGINTZ
The two dozen kids were too busy to pay much attention to the spectacular Hawaiian sunset glowing orange and pink. They were industriously stringing fresh-flower leis and weaving palm-leaf fish. Some were bowling on the grass and playing tug of war as the surf crashed behind them. Others were practicing saying their names in Hawaiian, or munching taro fries, teriyaki steak, fried mahi-mahi or fresh pineapple.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Competition was stiff at the Merrie Monarch Hula Festival held in Hilo on the island of Hawaii in April. Only groups with a solid reputation were invited to the festival, nicknamed the "Super Bowl of Hula," which many aficionados consider the most important of all hula competitions. When it was all over, the first-place winner in "modern" hula for women was the entry from Burbank. Burbank?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Craig Stecyk is an artist who finds much of his inspiration--not to mention his materials--in society's castoffs. Stecyk, 39, actually accumulated discarded paintings and sculpture for 10 years, taking them out of trash cans. In 1983, he piled them on a gallery floor at Claremont Graduate School and lined the walls with information cards such as the ones that document archeological artifacts. He called the exhibit "Art Trash."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1999 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A hula and chant festival or a hula and chant competition. These were the two options facing the Fullerton-based Na Mamo when the Hawaiian organization began considering the type of cultural event it wanted to present. "Initially we thought a festival would be much more friendly," says Na Mamo member and marketing director Bernadette Ahuna. "But we decided to make it a competition so that people would see something more authentic since the participants would be rated and critiqued.
MAGAZINE
March 17, 1996 | TIM APPELO, Tim Appelo is the film critic of the Portland Oregonian. His last story for Traveling in Style was on Washington's Olympic Peninsula
Lured by the famous "Hawaii Calls" radio broadcasts emanating from Honolulu's grand old Ala Moana Hotel, my grandparents visited Waikiki back in the 1940s, when it was nothing but a pristine, underpopulated beach stretching to Diamond Head. Hawaii became my family's occasional getaway from the eternal drizzle of our Washington hometown, a Finnish logging hamlet so sleepy the county dump closed forever in 1987 for lack of revenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2009 | Claire Noland
George Na'ope, a guardian of native Hawaiian culture who taught traditional hula dance and chanting to generations of students and introduced the ancient art forms to new audiences, has died. He was 81. Na'ope, who in 2006 was honored with a National Heritage Fellowship award by the National Endowment for the Arts, died Oct. 26 at his home in Hilo, Hawaii, after battling cancer. His death was announced by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Na'ope (pronounced nah-OH-peh) co-founded the Merrie Monarch Festival, a celebration of hula held annually since the early 1960s in Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Nona Beamer, a noted authority on Hawaiian culture and matriarch of the musical Beamer family, has died. She was 84. Beamer, a songwriter, performer, hula teacher and author, died in her sleep early Thursday at her home on Maui, said Mark Nelson, administrator of Aloha Music Camp, which Beamer founded and operated with her son Keola, a Grammy-nominated slack-key guitar artist. Nelson said he and Keola Beamer were on tour, which has now been canceled.
TRAVEL
August 20, 2000 | EILEEN OGINTZ
The two dozen kids were too busy to pay much attention to the spectacular Hawaiian sunset glowing orange and pink. They were industriously stringing fresh-flower leis and weaving palm-leaf fish. Some were bowling on the grass and playing tug of war as the surf crashed behind them. Others were practicing saying their names in Hawaiian, or munching taro fries, teriyaki steak, fried mahi-mahi or fresh pineapple.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1999 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A hula and chant festival or a hula and chant competition. These were the two options facing the Fullerton-based Na Mamo when the Hawaiian organization began considering the type of cultural event it wanted to present. "Initially we thought a festival would be much more friendly," says Na Mamo member and marketing director Bernadette Ahuna. "But we decided to make it a competition so that people would see something more authentic since the participants would be rated and critiqued.
MAGAZINE
March 17, 1996 | TIM APPELO, Tim Appelo is the film critic of the Portland Oregonian. His last story for Traveling in Style was on Washington's Olympic Peninsula
Lured by the famous "Hawaii Calls" radio broadcasts emanating from Honolulu's grand old Ala Moana Hotel, my grandparents visited Waikiki back in the 1940s, when it was nothing but a pristine, underpopulated beach stretching to Diamond Head. Hawaii became my family's occasional getaway from the eternal drizzle of our Washington hometown, a Finnish logging hamlet so sleepy the county dump closed forever in 1987 for lack of revenue.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The growth of Orange County's international business community not only expands trade, it also exposes executives and workers to new and different ways of doing things. Employees of South Coast Acura in Costa Mesa received a lesson in cultural diversity Tuesday as they watched a traditional Hawaiian purification and blessing ceremony held to help ease the dealership's move into its new facility.
TRAVEL
April 21, 2013 | By Julia Flynn Siler
HONOLULU - He's known as the Woody Guthrie of Hawaiian music, a virtuoso ukulele player who's helped to introduce new generations to music that might otherwise be lost. But on the autumn morning I met up with Eddie Kamae, few people seemed to recognize the octogenarian wearing Levis and a blue work shirt. It was just after 9 a.m., and Eddie was eating a bowl of vanilla ice cream at the Wailana Coffee House in Waikiki. He had risen before sunrise to pray, read the paper and watch the sky lighten from the nearby apartment building where he and his wife, Myrna, have lived for nearly half a century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2010 | Mcclatchy-Tribune News Service
Dorothy "Auntie Dottie" Thompson, who helped found and direct the Merrie Monarch Festival, Hawaii's most prestigious showcase for hula, died March 19 in Hilo after a long illness. She was 88. Thompson and George Na'ope co-founded the festival in 1964 with the intention of boosting tourism and cultural pride. Na'ope died in October at 81. The weeklong Merrie Monarch Festival, in Hilo's Edith Kanaka'ole Tennis Stadium, celebrates its 47th anniversary this year beginning April 4. Under Thompson's determined leadership, the festival remained little changed or modernized.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Competition was stiff at the Merrie Monarch Hula Festival held in Hilo on the island of Hawaii in April. Only groups with a solid reputation were invited to the festival, nicknamed the "Super Bowl of Hula," which many aficionados consider the most important of all hula competitions. When it was all over, the first-place winner in "modern" hula for women was the entry from Burbank. Burbank?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Craig Stecyk is an artist who finds much of his inspiration--not to mention his materials--in society's castoffs. Stecyk, 39, actually accumulated discarded paintings and sculpture for 10 years, taking them out of trash cans. In 1983, he piled them on a gallery floor at Claremont Graduate School and lined the walls with information cards such as the ones that document archeological artifacts. He called the exhibit "Art Trash."
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