Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHay Fever
IN THE NEWS

Hay Fever

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 21, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
You're not imagining that sneezy nose and those itchy eyes: Allergies have become increasingly prevalent in the last three decades, costing Americans about $21 billion every year. Researchers point to one possible factor (when it comes to hay fever, at least): climate change.  Recent increases in the length of the ragweed pollen season are associated with warming, they wrote in a study released Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . The team looked at pollen counts and weather data from 10 locations spanning more than 1,300 miles of the central part of North America -- from Georgetown, Texas (30.63 degrees north latitude)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Accustomed to living glamorously in the spotlight, Noël Coward conducted his private affairs, in the words of writer Rebecca West, "with an impeccable dignity … which was reticent but untainted by pretense. " Given that homosexual acts weren't decriminalized in Britain until 1967, Coward's glass-door closet wasn't just a witty place to be - it was also a fairly courageous one. But attitudes were rapidly changing. "Homosexuality is becoming as normal as blueberry-pie," Coward observed in his diaries in 1960.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1986 | CATHY DE MAYO
"Hay Fever" at Costa Mesa Civic Playhouse suffers from a transplant that never takes. Director PatiTambellini has pulled Noel Coward's drawing room comedy from the 1925 English countryside to the contemporary New England countryside, diluting its arch charm in the process. What remains is still amusing but disappointingly bland. Plot was never the strong suit of this romantic farce, which depends instead on the fey characters, dry wit and throwaway sophistication that Coward all but patented.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
Another year, another costume, another crop of celebrity parties. Halloween went down in Los Angeles, but who came out on top?  From cheeky to scary to simply strange, celebs dressed up and partied starting Saturday and chugging through the week to Wednesday's official fright night. Here's a rundown of the best fetes: Hay Fever : JustJared.com hosted bold names on Saturday at Hollywood's Siren Studios, offering up a maze made of bales of hay and a psychic reading tent from Oranum.com.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Fullerton Heritage is sponsoring a benefit performance of Noel Coward's play "Hay Fever" Friday to raise money for its campaign to save Fox Fullerton Theatre. Tickets are $25 per person. The organization's goal is to encourage the restoration of the historic downtown theater on Harbor Boulevard. The group has gathered more than 7,000 signatures of support. The play will be at the Vanguard Theatre, 699-A S. State College Blvd. Information: (714) 526-8007.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | ELAINE KURTENBACH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To its distinct seasons of spring, summer, fall, winter and the June rains, Japan has added a sixth--hay fever season--and it's in full bloom. Hay fever has become an annual, multimillion-dollar event in Japan, complete with daily television "pollen forecasts" and special surgical masks for the 20 million Japanese who sneeze their way through February, March, April and May.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Merck & Co. won approval from the Food and Drug Administration to sell its Singulair asthma medication as a treatment for hay fever, a market that the drug maker said may help sales of the medicine top $2 billion this year. Sales of Singulair, which requires a prescription, rose 7% to $1.1 billion in the first nine months of last year. The new allergy claim will allow Singulair to compete with Schering-Plough Corp.'s Claritin, the world's best-selling treatment.
NEWS
June 11, 1987 | United Press International
Prescription nasal sprays containing a steroid appear able to prevent much of the sniffling, sneezing and stuffiness that millions of Americans suffer annually from severe hay fever, doctors reported Wednesday. "I think it's a wonderful treatment," said Dr. Robert M. Naclerio, who headed the research at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. He reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that one type of steroid spray sharply reduced symptoms in 13 allergy patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1994 | JILL BETTNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hay fever season again. But you hardly need to be reminded if you're among the estimated 20% of Americans with pollen allergies. That means eyeballs that itch, noses that run and stuffed-up heads that feel about ready to explode. The symptoms probably showed up in the San Fernando Valley during the past couple of weeks, brought on by the recent spell of unusually warm and sometimes windy weather. So far, allergy experts say the pollen levels in the air are normal for this time of year.
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Do shyness and allergies go together? Maybe, say researchers who have found that shy people are more likely to have hay fever. "We think there is a small group of people who inherit a set of genes that predispose them to hay fever and shyness," said Jerome Kagan, a Harvard University psychology professor. With three co-authors, Kagan surveyed 379 college students, asking them to report on their own shyness and their allergies.
NEWS
February 23, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Children raised on farms don't suffer from asthma as much as their city- and suburb-dwelling counterparts, according to a paper published online Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. But it's not necessarily because of the fresh air, full sun and hard work, researchers say -- it's because of the germs. Scientists had known that many of the things associated with farm life -- unpasteurized milk, exposure to animals such as cows and pigs, and hay -- helped kids grow up with stronger constitutions, perhaps because they were being exposed to harmless, even beneficial, bacteria along the way. To test this hypothesis, the researchers analyzed samples of house dust to look at the microbes within.
NEWS
February 21, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
You're not imagining that sneezy nose and those itchy eyes: Allergies have become increasingly prevalent in the last three decades, costing Americans about $21 billion every year. Researchers point to one possible factor (when it comes to hay fever, at least): climate change.  Recent increases in the length of the ragweed pollen season are associated with warming, they wrote in a study released Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . The team looked at pollen counts and weather data from 10 locations spanning more than 1,300 miles of the central part of North America -- from Georgetown, Texas (30.63 degrees north latitude)
HEALTH
August 2, 2010 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In general, immunotherapy for non-food allergies requires multiple shots and is, well, a big pain. That could ultimately change, with two companies hoping to soon launch an under-the-tongue remedy in the United States. "It takes probably three years, at least, of immunotherapy to produce a good and lasting result," says Dr. Harold Nelson, an allergist at National Jewish Health in Denver. "An awful lot of people get tired of it." Safety also remains an issue. A recent survey of allergists found that three severe reactions occurred for every 100,000 injections.
BOOKS
June 22, 2008 | Sarfraz Manzoor, Sarfraz Manzoor writes for the Guardian. He is the author of the memoir "Greetings From Bury Park. "
THE SMALL market town of Hay, nestled on the border between England and Wales, is an unlikely setting for one of the world's biggest book festivals. It has a population of less than 2,000, and the nearest train station is 30 miles away. Yet each year, during the last week of May and the first weekend in June, upward of 100,000 people descend on this tiny town to attend the Hay Festival, a literary extravaganza that is now firmly established as the biggest book event in Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
SAN DIEGO -- Noel Coward, an Englishman with a queer bent and an unglamorous middle-class pedigree, had the last laugh on his aristocratic betters by teaching them the fine points of sophisticated style and wit. No surprise that he also took great delight in tweaking the nose of revered tradition.
HEALTH
May 1, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Federal health officials warned parents and doctors last week not to give drugs that contain promethazine hydrochloride to children younger than 2, citing seven cases of death linked to use of the antihistamine. The Food and Drug Administration said in a safety alert that beyond the deaths, it also has received 22 reports of severe breathing problems associated with use of the allergy drug, all in children younger than 2.
NEWS
March 19, 1990
Dozens of cameras whirred as a sniffling President Bush coughed and blew his nose. "It's news: a little hay fever in the air around here," the President apologized to his audience. Then, looking straight at the now-quieted cameras, Bush raised his handkerchief with a flourish for an exaggerated honk of his nose. Flashes lit the room like lightning and electric camera motors hummed in unison.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC EMERITUS
Noel Coward--Sir Noel--had a song for nearly every situation and if not a song then a play. His work, spoken or sung, reflected the elitist, mildly decadent times of his youth. This is certainly true of "Hay Fever," a cream puff he concocted in 1925, when the flapper world was at its giddiest and the brittle upper reaches of the affluent British middle-class were for him a grand source of comedy. That the world stood poised between two wars mattered not a whit.
TRAVEL
October 9, 2005 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
DENGUE fever has plunged Singapore into a health crisis, and public health officials worldwide are worried that avian flu will trigger a human influenza pandemic. Those developments reaffirm a basic travel truism: No one is truly prepared for a trip until he or she knows what diseases or conditions lurk at the destination -- whether it's New England or Indonesia -- and how to minimize the risk.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|