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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
It's only seven little letters, with a hyphen thrown in just for the heck of it, but to people in the know, the phrase "pre-Code" signifies cinematic buried treasure of the most satisfying kind. They're a sign of the secret life of American films, of a time after sound fully arrived in 1930 but before the enforcement of the moralistic Production Code in 1934.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009
Referring to Reed Johnson's article ["The Language of Desire," Feb. 15], another way to look at "gayness" in "The Maltese Falcon" is the Joel Cairo character played by Peter Lorre, who was openly gay in the book, but in 1941 John Huston couldn't display that. He uses this ploy that got by the powers to be: Upon Cairo's entrance into the movie, Effie, Sam's secretary, (played by Lee Patrick) brought Cairo's business card to Sam, he smelled the card, it smelled of gardenia and Sam's retort was truly a line that only Bogart could say, "Bring him in, Effie, bring him in."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Beginning this week at Melnitz Hall, the UCLA Film Archives glides us back to bawdier, yet more innocent times as, on Thursdays and weekends through September, it presents "Hollywood Before the Code": the movies, stars, subjects and even the cartoons (Betty Boop) that once allegedly polluted a nation's morals. It's a curious reminiscence and treat.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
It's only seven little letters, with a hyphen thrown in just for the heck of it, but to people in the know, the phrase "pre-Code" signifies cinematic buried treasure of the most satisfying kind. They're a sign of the secret life of American films, of a time after sound fully arrived in 1930 but before the enforcement of the moralistic Production Code in 1934.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | DENNIS JARRARD, Dennis Jarrard is former chairman of the Los Angeles Archdiocese's Commission on Obscenity and Pornography.
Last February, Cardinal Roger Mahony hailed an updated Motion Picture Code, or "Hays Code," as "one fruitful way" to solve the problem of motion pictures that glorify evil. Thousands of parents, filled with hope that he might clean up the movies, wrote and telephoned him. But by April, under pressure from Hollywood, he was telling Catholics in the industry that reviving the decency code was "the last thing I wish to do."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986
Otto Preminger was, of course, a distinguished motion picture director. He was not, however, a distinguished arbiter of morality or community standards ("Preminger's Assault on Hays Code," by Charles Champlin, April 26). His so-called breakthroughs with respect to the then-existing motion picture codes were, in my judgment, breakdowns, designed more to suit his personal beliefs than to mark any universal demand on the part of the public. The dike that he effectively helped to breach was never in real danger from him because he was a responsible motion picture director, nor from other responsible writers and directors who supported him. The problem was that the demise of the Hays Code and its successors paved the way for a horde of non-discriminating, tasteless Philistines to impose their feeble and immoral aesthetics on the rest of us. Now our "protection" must rely on an alphabetized ranking that is all but meaningless.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009
Referring to Reed Johnson's article ["The Language of Desire," Feb. 15], another way to look at "gayness" in "The Maltese Falcon" is the Joel Cairo character played by Peter Lorre, who was openly gay in the book, but in 1941 John Huston couldn't display that. He uses this ploy that got by the powers to be: Upon Cairo's entrance into the movie, Effie, Sam's secretary, (played by Lee Patrick) brought Cairo's business card to Sam, he smelled the card, it smelled of gardenia and Sam's retort was truly a line that only Bogart could say, "Bring him in, Effie, bring him in."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1989
Having attended Bob McKee's terrific class on screen writing, I enjoyed Calendar's Feb. 26 article (though writer Martin Zimmerman left out one of the best parts of McKee's seminar: his a cappella rendition of "As Time Goes By"). However, I was disturbed by McKee's uncharacteristically superficial view that the "relativization of values" is a major factor in the failure of many current screenplays--as if an ongoing examination of values by a society is a primarily destructive process.
OPINION
February 9, 1992
Will H. Hays, onetime postmaster general, onetime chairman of the Republican Party, was paid a princely salary in 1921-22 to come to Hollywood to set up enforcement of the film production code that would eventually bear his name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Civil Liberties Union, responding to Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's call for the entertainment industry to consider a new motion picture and television code, launched an anti-censorship campaign and petition drive Thursday urging the industry not to give in. In a full-page advertisement in the trade publication Daily Variety, the ACLU lambasted the proposed code, calling it "a list of moral rules that would return us to the 1950s."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | DENNIS JARRARD, Dennis Jarrard is former chairman of the Los Angeles Archdiocese's Commission on Obscenity and Pornography.
Last February, Cardinal Roger Mahony hailed an updated Motion Picture Code, or "Hays Code," as "one fruitful way" to solve the problem of motion pictures that glorify evil. Thousands of parents, filled with hope that he might clean up the movies, wrote and telephoned him. But by April, under pressure from Hollywood, he was telling Catholics in the industry that reviving the decency code was "the last thing I wish to do."
OPINION
February 9, 1992
Will H. Hays, onetime postmaster general, onetime chairman of the Republican Party, was paid a princely salary in 1921-22 to come to Hollywood to set up enforcement of the film production code that would eventually bear his name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Civil Liberties Union, responding to Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's call for the entertainment industry to consider a new motion picture and television code, launched an anti-censorship campaign and petition drive Thursday urging the industry not to give in. In a full-page advertisement in the trade publication Daily Variety, the ACLU lambasted the proposed code, calling it "a list of moral rules that would return us to the 1950s."
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony called on the entertainment industry Saturday to consider a new code that would severely restrict the content of motion pictures and television programs by forbidding--among other things--nudity, suggestive dancing, lustful kissing and the portrayal of law enforcement officers dying at the hands of criminals. Mahony stopped short of calling for mandatory compliance with the code, authored by the Atlanta-based Christian Film and Television Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The matter of anniversaries divisible by five has arisen again, compounded this time by the curious charm of a century divided into quarters. It was 25 years ago this very day that I took up my chores at the Los Angeles Times. As usual on such an occasion the air is full of ghosts and memories, all tinted with astonishment that it has been so long.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1989
Having attended Bob McKee's terrific class on screen writing, I enjoyed Calendar's Feb. 26 article (though writer Martin Zimmerman left out one of the best parts of McKee's seminar: his a cappella rendition of "As Time Goes By"). However, I was disturbed by McKee's uncharacteristically superficial view that the "relativization of values" is a major factor in the failure of many current screenplays--as if an ongoing examination of values by a society is a primarily destructive process.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony called on the entertainment industry Saturday to consider a new code that would severely restrict the content of motion pictures and television programs by forbidding--among other things--nudity, suggestive dancing, lustful kissing and the portrayal of law enforcement officers dying at the hands of criminals. Mahony stopped short of calling for mandatory compliance with the code, authored by the Atlanta-based Christian Film and Television Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1986 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Otto Preminger, who died earlier this week at the age of 80, was an unlikely knight in shining armor, and yet it's true that he galloped to the rescue of the movies, won his fight and helped to inaugurate a new day. The ride to the rescue might have been spurred, as it was, by his self-interest and his often irascible ways; still he had a hand in deflecting film history. From 1934, the movies out of the major Hollywood studios had been made under the strict and moralistic terms of the Hays Code.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Beginning this week at Melnitz Hall, the UCLA Film Archives glides us back to bawdier, yet more innocent times as, on Thursdays and weekends through September, it presents "Hollywood Before the Code": the movies, stars, subjects and even the cartoons (Betty Boop) that once allegedly polluted a nation's morals. It's a curious reminiscence and treat.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986
Otto Preminger was, of course, a distinguished motion picture director. He was not, however, a distinguished arbiter of morality or community standards ("Preminger's Assault on Hays Code," by Charles Champlin, April 26). His so-called breakthroughs with respect to the then-existing motion picture codes were, in my judgment, breakdowns, designed more to suit his personal beliefs than to mark any universal demand on the part of the public. The dike that he effectively helped to breach was never in real danger from him because he was a responsible motion picture director, nor from other responsible writers and directors who supported him. The problem was that the demise of the Hays Code and its successors paved the way for a horde of non-discriminating, tasteless Philistines to impose their feeble and immoral aesthetics on the rest of us. Now our "protection" must rely on an alphabetized ranking that is all but meaningless.
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