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TRAVEL
April 10, 2005
RECENTLY my wife and I motored over most of the highways covered by the seven couples on their 625-mile journey in New Zealand [High Adventure in Low Gear," April 3]. We had ample opportunity to experience road conditions and witness the driving habits. Your readers should be aware that narrow, winding New Zealand roads can make a biking trip risky. When taking the occasional high-speed, erratic automobile driver into consideration, the experience can be downright hazardous. Stan Ehrlich Thousand Oaks
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
An oil operation that sent noxious fumes into a South Los Angeles neighborhood has agreed to spend about $700,000 on upgrades to prevent future hazardous emissions, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday. The settlement capped a four-month investigation by the EPA into Allenco Energy Inc. that was prompted by hundreds of complaints of chemical odors, respiratory ailments, nosebleeds and other health problems in the University Park community, about a half-mile north of USC. "The company must notify the EPA that they have completed the improvements at least 15 days before reopening," said Jared Blumenfeld, the EPA's regional administrator for the Pacific Southwest.
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SPORTS
October 27, 1990
Dynasty? Die Nasty, Boys! MERLE LEE FREEMAN Marina del Rey
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The California Environmental Protection Agency has released a statewide list of census tracts most burdened by pollution, providing a first-of-its-kind ranking certain to pressure regulators to clean up neighborhoods with long-standing health risks. Many of the worst pollution pockets identified and mapped by state officials are in the San Joaquin Valley, Los Angeles County and the Inland Empire. Their residents are largely low-income Latinos who have had little power to force improvements in their communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1989 | JEFFREY BEAN, Times Staff Writer
A Chula Vista toxic-waste treatment plant will store the cargo that caught fire Tuesday aboard a truck until tests on the materials are conducted and it can be shipped to an out-of-state incinerator, officials said. Federal, state, county and Chula Vista city officials are investigating the blaze. They are scheduled to meet Friday at Appropriate Technologies II to determine if the load is safe to move, said Tim Sparks, general manager of the plant. A 55-gallon drum of acrylic resin on a 40-foot trailer being pulled by the truck caught on fire as the truck climbed a hill on Maxwell Road near the plant's entrance.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
About 5,000 cribs made by Cranbury, N.J.-based LaJobi Inc. are being recalled because the three models -- Bonavita "Cabana," Bonavita "Hudson" and Babi Italia "Pinehurst" -- pose entrapment and suffocation hazards to children. Consumers should stop using the cribs immediately. The Cabana cribs, which were manufactured in Vietnam from January 2006 through October 2008 and have production dates between Jan. 1, 2006, and Oct. 31, 2008, feature wooden crib slats that can detach or break.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1989 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, Times Staff Writer
An executive of Western Waste Industries, who served on the state Waste Management Board for 10 years, has been fined $125,000 after pleading no contest to charges of illegally disposing of hazardous waste mixed with household garbage. The fine imposed this week against Hacob (Jake) Shirvanian is the largest ever assessed against an individual for an environmental crime in Los Angeles County, according to the district attorney's office. Shirvanian, vice president and manager of Western Waste, was convicted of three misdemeanor counts of illegal disposal of heavy metals and dry-cleaning wastes that were dumped at landfills in the San Gabriel Valley and Glendale.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann, a regular contributor to Orange County Life, is a former emergency medical technician.
Warning: Your home may be hazardous to your child's health. In addition to the obvious dangers, such as swimming pools and pesticides, there are many perils that are overlooked because they are ordinary household objects. For example, that beautiful bird of paradise plant by the front door. Did you know it's poisonous? Or that bag of popcorn popping in the microwave; it can cause serious steam burns and shouldn't be handled by children. The hot dogs you made for lunch, chunks of which are one of the biggest causes of children choking.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, Times Staff Writer
An executive of Western Waste Industries, who served on the state Waste Management Board for 10 years, has been fined $125,000 after pleading no contest to charges of illegally disposing of hazardous waste mixed with household garbage. The fine imposed last week against Hacob (Jake) Shirvanian is the largest ever assessed against an individual for an environmental crime in Los Angeles County, according to the district attorney's office. Shirvanian, vice president and manager of Western Waste, was convicted of three misdemeanor counts of illegal disposal of heavy metals and dry-cleaning wastes that were dumped at landfills in the San Gabriel Valley and Glendale.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2009 | W.J. Hennigan
A Los Angeles firm agreed to pay $31,500 to settle allegations that it imported and sold toys that were hazardous to young children, the Consumer Product Safety Commission said. TGH International Trading Inc. brought more than 11,000 toys into the U.S. from March 2005 to June 2006 that contained small parts that presented a choking hazard to children. Many of the hazardous toys were seized at the Port of Long Beach by federal officials before they could reach store shelves, the agency said, and those that did reach stores were recalled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Justice Department on Thursday announced that Anadarko Petroleum Corp. had agreed to pay $5.15 billion to clean up hazardous substances dumped nationwide - including radioactive uranium waste across the Navajo Nation - in the largest settlement ever for environmental contamination. The operations of Kerr-McGee Corp. - which was acquired by Anadarko in 2006 - also left behind radioactive thorium in Chicago and West Chicago, Ill.; creosote waste in the Northeast, the Midwest and the South; and perchlorate waste in Nevada, according to U.S. Deputy Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison and Kim Christensen
A Northern California metal-plating business and its owner were charged Thursday with felony violations of state hazardous waste laws, including storing cyanide near acid in a way that could have triggered a deadly accident. Electro-Forming Co. and Marion Ingrid Patigler face 11 felony counts and 12 misdemeanor charges related to the alleged illegal disposal, storage, treatment and transportation of hazardous waste. The alleged crimes - which include storing cyanide and other toxic substances in an unpermitted, 6,900-gallon tank at the Richmond site - occurred over a two-year period beginning in March 2011, according to a criminal complaint filed by the Contra Costa County district attorney's office.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
By overwhelming critical consensus, 2013 was a banner year for movies. End-of-the-year lists, that dependable fruitcake of entertainment journalism, arrived with festive unanimity. It was a "tremendous" (the Atlantic's Christopher Orr), "amazing" (the New Yorker's Richard Brody), "flat-out, stone-cold, hands-down spectacular year in movies" (the Washington Post's Ann Hornaday). As a theater critic who loves spending his free nights plunged in cinematic darkness, I couldn't have been more excited to get these reports amplifying the raves that came fast and furious all fall.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
Lately we've learned from some very powerful companies that trying to balance family and work can be hazardous to your employment. This month, AOL Chief Executive Tim Armstrong incited a firestorm when he blamed rising healthcare costs for having to cut back on the company's retirement plan. He attributed the proposed benefits cuts to the expense of having to care for two “ distressed babies ” who needed medical attention. To blame sick babies for the scaling back of other employee benefits is misplaced at best, especially considering the enormous profits the company has made in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
More than 1,900 acres of the former Marine Corps Air Station El Toro in Irvine have been cleaned up and removed from the list of the nation's most hazardous sites after more than two decades, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Monday. Officials say $165 million in soil removal and groundwater treatment by the U.S. Navy and local water agencies has cleaned up contamination at much of the old World War II-era air base, to the point that it no longer poses a risk to human health or the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Kim Christensen
A man accused of illegally storing more than 200 drums of hazardous waste at a San Joaquin County truck stop has been fined $243,000 and barred for life from transporting such toxic materials, state regulators said Monday. In a civil complaint filed last year, the Department of Toxic Substances Control accused Jose G. Sosa of  abandoning 228 drums filled with spent aerosol cans, flammable propellants, used motor oil and substances containing mercury. Local police found the drums in a trailer parked at Jimco Truck Plaza in Ripon, Calif., in 2010.
SPORTS
December 7, 1991
Is long-term exposure to Ram football hazardous to my health? CHRISTOPHER GRISANTI Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
More than 1,900 acres of the retired Marine Corps Air Station El Toro in Irvine have been cleaned up and removed from the list of the nation's most hazardous sites after more than two decades, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Monday. Officials said that $165 million in soil removal and groundwater treatment by the U.S. Navy and local water agencies has cleaned up contamination at much of the old World War II-era air base, to the point it no longer poses a risk to human health or the environment.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A fire and structural collapse at an animal feed processing plant killed two people and injured 10 others, four critically, Omaha authorities said Monday. Officials had said the fire at the International Nutrition plant could have been precipitated by an explosion. But later, in a televised news conference, Omaha Interim Fire Chief Bernie Kanger said it was unclear whether there had been a blast. "We are classifying this as an industrial accident that led to a structural fire," he said.
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