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Hazardous Materials California

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NEWS
April 9, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
California has 3,474 sites that may be contaminated by radioactive material, more than any state except Colorado, according to the federal government's first attempt to make a national inventory of such sites. The study, commissioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and released Wednesday by a Senate committee, found more than 45,300 such potential "hot spots" across the nation. It concluded the government is responsible for about half of them.
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NEWS
April 9, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
California has 3,474 sites that may be contaminated by radioactive material, more than any state except Colorado, according to the federal government's first attempt to make a national inventory of such sites. The study, commissioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and released Wednesday by a Senate committee, found more than 45,300 such potential "hot spots" across the nation. It concluded the government is responsible for about half of them.
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NEWS
September 29, 1986
A nursery fire spewed toxic fumes over an area of several blocks in the Goleta Valley, west of Santa Barbara. About 450 people were evacuated from their homes when flames erupted from a greenhouse at the Por La Mar Nursery. Santa Barbara County Fire Capt. Charles Johnson said the fire spread from the greenhouse to a warehouse and small office, and then to pesticides--which made the smoke toxic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1991
The recent spate of "accidental" spills of hazardous materials in California make one thing perfectly clear: Hazardous material management and pollution control have never succeeded in protecting either the urban or the fragile natural environment and probably never will. It is high time for a thorough assessment of the way industry and agriculture operate, with the goal of reducing and eliminating, wherever possible, the use of toxic substances. Environmentally benign alternatives already exist for many of the processes and practices that now involve hazardous materials and they should be phased in immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1985 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, Times Staff Writer
A coalition of environmental groups, charging a failure of Orange County and Los Angeles sanitation districts to halt industrial dumping of toxic materials into sewer systems, threatened Wednesday to take legal action against offenders if the local sewer agencies and the Environmental Protection Agency do not crack down.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2005 | Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles is conducting a criminal investigation into Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s handling of merchandise classified as hazardous waste. The world's largest retailer said in a regulatory filing that prosecutors were probing potential violations of the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, which regulates the transportation, handling and disposal of waste.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Pacific Transportation Co. has kept a low profile as it tries to ride out the storm of criticism after the historic railroad's second serious chemical spill from a derailed train in two weeks. It has already quietly lifted a temporary, self-imposed ban on transporting the pesticide that killed virtually all life along 45 miles of the Sacramento River in the first spill.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Presidio looks more like a park than a military base, with towering eucalyptus and cypress trees shading lush lawns and creeks winding through 1,800 hilly acres above the Golden Gate Bridge and the Pacific Ocean. In fact, it soon will be a park: The Army plans to move out in 1995 and turn over the nation's oldest fort to the National Park Service. Yet, beneath the Presidio's greenery lie the products of decades of spills, leaks and ill-planned dumping of poisonous chemicals.
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