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Hazardous Materials Washington State

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BUSINESS
April 3, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Energy has fined a Fluor Corp. subsidiary $140,625 for repeated safety violations by two of its subcontractors last year during cleanup of a former nuclear weapons plant in Hanford, Wash. It is the largest levy against a civilian contractor since the department began enforcing nuclear facility safety rules in 1996, but it wasn't enough for critics, who called it a slap on the wrist. The fine was disclosed in a March 26 letter to Fluor Daniel Hanford Inc.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Energy has fined a Fluor Corp. subsidiary $140,625 for repeated safety violations by two of its subcontractors last year during cleanup of a former nuclear weapons plant in Hanford, Wash. It is the largest levy against a civilian contractor since the department began enforcing nuclear facility safety rules in 1996, but it wasn't enough for critics, who called it a slap on the wrist. The fine was disclosed in a March 26 letter to Fluor Daniel Hanford Inc.
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NEWS
July 28, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is probably no more-contaminated place on Earth than this wind-whipped nuclear desert in central Washington, which for 45 years was the plutonium kitchen that fueled much of the U.S. nuclear arsenal. By the time it shut down production in 1989 and embarked on what would become the nation's biggest environmental cleanup, the Hanford Nuclear Reservation had accumulated 450 billion gallons of liquid wastes and 200 square miles of contaminated ground water.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is probably no more-contaminated place on Earth than this wind-whipped nuclear desert in central Washington, which for 45 years was the plutonium kitchen that fueled much of the U.S. nuclear arsenal. By the time it shut down production in 1989 and embarked on what would become the nation's biggest environmental cleanup, the Hanford Nuclear Reservation had accumulated 450 billion gallons of liquid wastes and 200 square miles of contaminated ground water.
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