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Hazardous Substances

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NEWS
November 15, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
California health authorities announced today that they will begin a cleanup of hazardous substances at a bankrupt oil refinery in Canyon Country. The state Department of Health Services has initially earmarked up to $1 million on the cleanup of the five-acre Lubrication Co. of America site on Lang Station Road east of the Antelope Valley Freeway, said Richard Varenchik, a spokesman for the agency.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Justice Department on Thursday announced that Anadarko Petroleum Corp. had agreed to pay $5.15 billion to clean up hazardous substances dumped nationwide - including radioactive uranium waste across the Navajo Nation - in the largest settlement ever for environmental contamination. The operations of Kerr-McGee Corp. - which was acquired by Anadarko in 2006 - also left behind radioactive thorium in Chicago and West Chicago, Ill.; creosote waste in the Northeast, the Midwest and the South; and perchlorate waste in Nevada, according to U.S. Deputy Atty.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 2006 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Gerald Barker is in the business of making people feel better -- not harming them. His company, Coherent Inc., makes sophisticated machines that produce high-performance lasers. The light beams are used to perform glaucoma surgery and to produce stents that are implanted in arteries to ward off heart attacks, among other applications. But some of the 50,000 materials used to manufacture its products contained minute amounts of six hazardous substances, such as lead and mercury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | Louis Sahagun
When it comes to a battered environment, few places can match Ken Malloy Harbor Regional Park, an empire of weeds, trash and vagrant encampments surrounding a polluted lake crawling with nonnative snails as big as baseballs, voracious water snakes and snapping turtles. The park's Lake Machado is best known as the swampy hideout of the abandoned alligator Reggie, who won international fame after officials spent $200,000 trying to catch him. Reggie was finally snagged in 2007 with a dog-catcher's pole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1988 | JUDY R. BERLFEIN, Berlfein is a free - lance science writer in Encinitas.
When the warehouse of Westchem Agricultural Chemicals Inc. in Minot, N.D., caught on fire in April, 1987, fire crews rushed in and hosed down the flames. Unfortunately, their quick response only led to more problems. As it turned out, barrels of pesticides had been stored inside the warehouse, and the water that squelched the fire also washed the toxic chemicals into the soil, posing a threat to the local drinking water supply. At first, it seemed that the only solution was to haul the contaminated soil to a landfill.
NEWS
January 16, 1986
The City Council decided on Tuesday to develop its own state-mandated plan to keep tabs on hazardous substances stored by city businesses, rather than participate in a program coordinated by Los Angeles County. The Torrance Fire Department will coordinate the city's program, which will require inventories of hazardous substances and emergency response plans from businesses that handle such materials.
NEWS
April 22, 1986
Federal regulations covering the training of truckers hauling hazardous cargoes are vague and need strengthening to reduce the risk of a major disaster, three House subcommittee chairmen said. Reps. Timothy E. Wirth (D-Colo.), Cardiss Collins (D-Ill.) and James J. Florio (D-N.J.) released a study blaming human error for about two-thirds of the transportation accidents involving hazardous substances such as toxic chemicals and radioactive materials.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1987
The Palo Alto-based laboratory said it asked federal authorities last week to help it to locate and remove from pharmacy and wholesalers' stocks a limited number of bottles of counterfeit tablets illegally labeled as 375 mg. Naprosyn(R) tablets, packaged in bottles of 500 tablets each. Syntex said that it notified about 70,000 pharmacists and wholesalers. It appears that fewer than 60 bottles of the counterfeit tablets were dispensed.
SCIENCE
November 19, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will study a remote island used as an airstrip in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands that is often littered with plastic debris, the first step in a process that could eventually place it on the list of the country's most hazardous sites. In a letter to an environmental group, the agency said it will study Tern Island, part of a coral reef atoll about 550 miles northwest of Honolulu that is a breeding ground for millions of seabirds. The decision came in response to a petition filed last year by the Center for Biological Diversity.
HOME & GARDEN
November 18, 2004
Re "On Scent, We've Barely Scratched the Surface" [Nov. 4]: Air fresheners have been shown to cause respiratory distress, contribute to asthma and negatively affect the function of the nervous system, which, by the way, includes the brain. Almost everything in fragrances are volatile organic compounds. This class of chemicals has been deemed so unhealthy that paint manufacturers have been forced to dramatically limit them in their products. Many fragrances contain known hazardous substances, yet the Food and Drug Administration refuses to require a warning label on these products despite its own regulation that requires this.
SCIENCE
November 19, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will study a remote island used as an airstrip in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands that is often littered with plastic debris, the first step in a process that could eventually place it on the list of the country's most hazardous sites. In a letter to an environmental group, the agency said it will study Tern Island, part of a coral reef atoll about 550 miles northwest of Honolulu that is a breeding ground for millions of seabirds. The decision came in response to a petition filed last year by the Center for Biological Diversity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2008 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
To a chemist, chlorine is the perfect compound. Easily combining with other elements and molecules, chlorine is transformed into new classes of chemicals with an endless array of uses. It disinfects water, cleans clothes, kills bugs, degreases metals, bleaches paper. It has long been vital to the synthesis of plastics, drugs, microchips and many other products around the globe. But to environmental scientists, chlorine is a perfect nightmare. Fumes seeping from a tanker could kill thousands.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2006 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Gerald Barker is in the business of making people feel better -- not harming them. His company, Coherent Inc., makes sophisticated machines that produce high-performance lasers. The light beams are used to perform glaucoma surgery and to produce stents that are implanted in arteries to ward off heart attacks, among other applications. But some of the 50,000 materials used to manufacture its products contained minute amounts of six hazardous substances, such as lead and mercury.
HOME & GARDEN
November 18, 2004
Re "On Scent, We've Barely Scratched the Surface" [Nov. 4]: Air fresheners have been shown to cause respiratory distress, contribute to asthma and negatively affect the function of the nervous system, which, by the way, includes the brain. Almost everything in fragrances are volatile organic compounds. This class of chemicals has been deemed so unhealthy that paint manufacturers have been forced to dramatically limit them in their products. Many fragrances contain known hazardous substances, yet the Food and Drug Administration refuses to require a warning label on these products despite its own regulation that requires this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998
The county Department of Health Services has the power to shut down food facilities for as long as necessary for the owners to correct conditions that pose a danger to the public health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1997 | AL MEYERHOFF, Al Meyerhoff is a senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council in New York
California's landmark Proposition 65, aimed at protecting the public from toxic substances, faces nullification if a measure now under consideration in Congress is enacted. At the behest of powerful trade associations, Sen. James M. Jeffords (R-Vt.) has introduced legislation that would preempt the power of individual states to regulate--or even warn their citizens about--toxic chemicals found in over-the-counter drugs and cosmetics. Food, too, may be added to the list.
NEWS
January 10, 1985 | PATRICIA McCORMACK, United Press International
The work that cosmetologists and hairdressers do may be hazardous to their health. The same goes for some other jobs performed mostly by women. The health problems women face on the job was the subject of a report compiled by the National Commission on Working Women. The study--"Caution: Your Work May be Hazardous to Your Health"--said that cosmetologists and hairdressers face a higher risk of some kinds of cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1986 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
An Anaheim steel salvage yard is a threat to public health and the environment and should be shut down until it stops operating illegally, state health officials alleged in a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Orange County Superior Court. Hazardous wastes from the Orange County Steel Salvage Co. yard at 3200 E. Frontera Road have polluted the ground and pose a serious threat to ground-water supplies and the air, the suit alleges. Cleanup Orders The firm's president, George Adams Jr.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling Cold War-era radiation experiments on often-unsuspecting patients "unconscionable," Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) Thursday urged President Clinton to order a government-wide review to determine whether any similar experiments with other dangerous substances had been performed or were now under way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Mexican businessman has been sentenced to three months in jail and fined $25,000 for transporting hazardous waste from the San Fernando Valley to Mexico--the first conviction involving an international border under a 1985 California toxic waste law, prosecutors said Wednesday. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance Ito sentenced Horacio Sosa, 55, Tuesday under a plea agreement made with the district attorney's office.
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