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Hazardous Waste Dumps Los Angeles County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1992 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They told Phyllis Lee when she and her husband bought their Montebello home in 1976 that the landfill across the street would be a golf course one day. Sixteen years later, it's still a dump, and now there is some fear it is leaking cancer-causing gas. "It's three times taller than it was when we moved here. It smelled for a long time," Lee said of the brown heap that fills up the view from her living room window.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | DEANNA WELCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Several oil companies and 45 municipalities appear to be poised for a legal battle over who should pay to clean up waste on the Carson site that was once in contention for a professional football stadium. Representatives of Commercial Realty Projects, which owns the 157-acre former landfill that borders the San Diego and Harbor freeway interchange, say the oil companies should pay the estimated $30-million cleanup bill because they deposited most of the caustic waste that is there.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1996
Against the vigorous opposition of many Pico Rivera residents, state officials have renewed an agreement allowing the Southern California Gas Co. to store up to 60,000 gallons of toxic waste in the city. Officials from the state Department of Toxic Substances Control said they approved the 10-year permit this week after reviewing the company's spotless, 12-year record of handling thousands of barrels filled with dangerous chemicals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1998
Federal officials announced Thursday they are proposing that a former waste treatment and storage facility be added to the Superfund list of sites considered a threat to public health. Omega Chemical Corp. on East Whittier Boulevard would become the 16th Superfund site in the Los Angeles region, said Lois Grunwald, a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency spokeswoman. Both the soil and ground water at the Omega site are contaminated with potentially cancer-causing substances, Grunwald said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1993 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Navy has agreed to pay more than $1 million to help finance the cleanup of lingering contamination at a Monterey Park landfill--one of the nation's worst hazardous-waste sites. The settlement on behalf of the Long Beach Naval Facility, which sent 635,000 gallons of industrial waste to the dump--will absolve the Navy from liability in the first stage of the cleanup, federal environmental officials announced Tuesday in San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | DEANNA WELCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Several oil companies and 45 municipalities appear to be poised for a legal battle over who should pay to clean up waste on the Carson site that was once in contention for a professional football stadium. Representatives of Commercial Realty Projects, which owns the 157-acre former landfill that borders the San Diego and Harbor freeway interchange, say the oil companies should pay the estimated $30-million cleanup bill because they deposited most of the caustic waste that is there.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
$130 Million Superfund Settlement in Monterey Park: More than 170 parties and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reached agreement over cleanup of the Operating Industries Inc. Superfund site in the largest private party settlement of its kind. Two earlier settlements at the same site totaled $75 million. The consent decree was entered in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
BKK Corp., which hopes to open a regional garbage dump in a mountain canyon near Santa Clarita, will pay $304,500 in fines for various violations involving the closure of its hazardous-waste landfill in West Covina, officials announced Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1993
Federal environmental officials in San Francisco announced Tuesday that the U.S. Navy has agreed to pay more than $1 million to help finance the cleanup of lingering contamination in at one of the nation's worst hazardous-waste dump sites. For several years, until environmental and health officials ordered the 190-acre Monterey Park landfill closed in 1984, the Long Beach Naval Facility sent waste to the dump, now designated as a federal Superfund site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday ordered five firms and a property owner to pay a $2.5-million share of the Superfund cleanup of Burbank's ground water. The order was issued to Aeroquip Corp., Janco Corp., Ocean Technology Inc., Sargent Industries, Hydro-Aire Co. and the Antonini Family Trust. The EPA in 1989 had declared them "potentially responsible" for Burbank water pollution because of contaminated soil found on their properties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998
The federal government said it has notified about 950 entities, including the Port of Los Angeles and the City of Pasadena, that they could be liable for dumping waste at Monterey Park landfill, now listed as an EPA Superfund site. The entities contributed between 4,500 and 110,000 gallons of waste to the Operating Industries Inc. landfill site, said U.S. Environmental Protection Agency spokeswoman Lois Grunwald.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1996
Against the vigorous opposition of many Pico Rivera residents, state officials have renewed an agreement allowing the Southern California Gas Co. to store up to 60,000 gallons of toxic waste in the city. Officials from the state Department of Toxic Substances Control said they approved the 10-year permit this week after reviewing the company's spotless, 12-year record of handling thousands of barrels filled with dangerous chemicals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many longtime residents of unincorporated South Whittier say they hardly remember receiving a notice in the mail nine years ago concerning the existence of an abandoned toxic dump in their neighborhood. The letter, posted by the federal Environmental Protection Agency, referred to a forgotten vat of noxious sludge hidden beneath several feet of dirt near Los Nietos Road and Greenleaf Avenue in neighboring Santa Fe Springs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1995
Plans to return former Harbor Gateway residents to a DDT-contaminated neighborhood have been scrapped until at least next year. The 33 families, who were evacuated from their homes on West 204th Street last April, are demanding that the EPA deem the area unsafe for habitation. The decision to postpone excavation of the landfill was prompted by Rep. Jane Harman (D-Torrance), who said she was surprised to learn a few weeks ago that the residents were expected to reoccupy the homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1995
Federal environmental agents served a search warrant Tuesday at a Whittier hazardous waste storage site where toxic solvents were leaking from containers and posing a threat to the community. Cleanup crews will be at the Omega Chemical Corp. facility in the 12500 block of East Whittier Boulevard for at least two months to remove and dispose of hazardous materials and to decontaminate and dispose of equipment exposed to the waste, said Assistant U.S. Atty. Kurt Zimmerman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1995 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $7-million plan to remove DDT-tainted soil from a South Bay neighborhood was unveiled Friday by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials who said it would allow most or all of 33 relocated families to return to their homes this fall. The plan was criticized by community leader Cynthia Babich, who has repeatedly called on the federal government to permanently relocate families away from 204th Street east of Torrance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will arrange health testing for residents of a South Bay neighborhood who have long complained of health problems that they fear are caused by chemicals from two nearby toxic waste sites. A top EPA official notified residents Friday that the agency has agreed to test their blood for DDT and other chemicals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1995
Plans to return former Harbor Gateway residents to a DDT-contaminated neighborhood have been scrapped until at least next year. The 33 families, who were evacuated from their homes on West 204th Street last April, are demanding that the EPA deem the area unsafe for habitation. The decision to postpone excavation of the landfill was prompted by Rep. Jane Harman (D-Torrance), who said she was surprised to learn a few weeks ago that the residents were expected to reoccupy the homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will arrange health testing for residents of a South Bay neighborhood who have long complained of health problems that they fear are caused by chemicals from two nearby toxic waste sites. A top EPA official notified residents Friday that the agency has agreed to test their blood for DDT and other chemicals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1993 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators who took soil samples from the back yards of 12 homes near Harbor Gateway in September were looking for contaminants that might have spread from the nearby Del Amo Pits, a proposed Superfund site. But they were surprised to find that, while none of the soil samples contained unsafe levels of the toxic chemicals they were searching for, two of the samples contained unusually high levels of the banned insecticide DDT. Investigators, who announced their findings this week, were in the neighborhood to check whether any heavy metals from a former rubber manufacturing plant nearby had found their way into residents' yards.
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