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Hazardous Waste Dumps Riverside County

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NEWS
June 4, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In the largest settlement yet in a long-running legal battle over toxic dumping at the Stringfellow Acid Pits, an aluminum manufacturer has agreed to pay $18 million to 3,800 residents of the nearby Riverside County community of Glen Avon. The tentative settlement with Alumax Inc., which is subject to court approval, was reached last week and announced Monday by Melvyn I. Weiss, a New York attorney who represents the residents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending years of convoluted litigation between the state and federal governments, California has agreed to pay $114.5 million for the cleanup of two infamous toxic dumps, including the Stringfellow acid pits near Riverside, once a receptacle for 35 million gallons of industrial chemicals. Gov. Gray Davis announced Monday that the state will reimburse the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency $99.
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NEWS
October 18, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning an important new phase in the cleanup of California's most notorious toxic waste site, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to extract and treat contaminated ground water migrating from the Stringfellow Acid Pits.
NEWS
January 12, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a courtroom like few others--with more than 30 attorneys staged in a gallery terraced like bleachers at a ballgame, and 18 computer video monitors for high-tech display of exhibits--allegations began spewing forth Monday in the landmark Stringfellow Acid Pits civil trial.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Nearly two decades after a Riverside County landfill was identified as the worst toxic waste site in California, private companies that dumped most of the hazardous materials have agreed to pay $150 million to help clean it up. The work covered by the settlement, announced at a Los Angeles news conference Thursday, will involve treating contaminated underground water at the Stringfellow Acid Pits and testing cleanup technologies on the soil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending years of convoluted litigation between the state and federal governments, California has agreed to pay $114.5 million for the cleanup of two infamous toxic dumps, including the Stringfellow acid pits near Riverside, once a receptacle for 35 million gallons of industrial chemicals. Gov. Gray Davis announced Monday that the state will reimburse the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency $99.
NEWS
January 12, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a courtroom like few others--with more than 30 attorneys staged in a gallery terraced like bleachers at a ballgame, and 18 computer video monitors for high-tech display of exhibits--allegations began spewing forth Monday in the landmark Stringfellow Acid Pits civil trial.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen years ago, Penny Newman was a soft-spoken special education teacher, a mother of two whose community activities tended toward PTA and Cub Scout meetings. But that changed in 1979 when a series of rainstorms led the Stringfellow Acid Pits to overflow into the back yards and school playgrounds of the Riverside County community of Glen Avon, Newman's home.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Nearly two decades after a Riverside County landfill was identified as the worst toxic waste site in California, private companies that dumped most of the hazardous materials have agreed to pay $150 million to help clean it up. The work covered by the settlement, announced at a Los Angeles news conference Thursday, will involve treating contaminated underground water at the Stringfellow Acid Pits and testing cleanup technologies on the soil.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen years ago, Penny Newman was a soft-spoken special education teacher, a mother of two whose community activities tended toward PTA and Cub Scout meetings. But that changed in 1979 when a series of rainstorms led the Stringfellow Acid Pits to overflow into the back yards and school playgrounds of the Riverside County community of Glen Avon, Newman's home.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In the largest settlement yet in a long-running legal battle over toxic dumping at the Stringfellow Acid Pits, an aluminum manufacturer has agreed to pay $18 million to 3,800 residents of the nearby Riverside County community of Glen Avon. The tentative settlement with Alumax Inc., which is subject to court approval, was reached last week and announced Monday by Melvyn I. Weiss, a New York attorney who represents the residents.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning an important new phase in the cleanup of California's most notorious toxic waste site, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to extract and treat contaminated ground water migrating from the Stringfellow Acid Pits.
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