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Hazardous Waste Dumps Santa Barbara County

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NEWS
August 29, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Warning that a million gallons of toxic waste threatens nearby ground water, the U.S. Department of Justice and Santa Barbara County sued Wednesday to force a sweeping cleanup of a controversial hazardous waste dump near Santa Maria. The double-barreled legal action by county and federal authorities seeks at least $6.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More toxic barrels have been found buried at the former Casmalia Resources toxic waste dump in Santa Barbara County, and there's evidence that hundreds more may be underground. Work crews last week discovered two barrels beneath a heavy metals landfill they were preparing to permanently seal. The barrels were 13 feet underground.
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NEWS
January 13, 1991 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of Casmalia, who blamed a nearby toxic waste dump for health problems in their community, have settled a lawsuit they filed against the dump's owner. Ken Hunter Jr., owner of Casmalia Resources, agreed last week to pay about $10 million to the 320 plaintiffs in the case, sources said. The exact amount could not be determined because Hunter demanded that the terms of the agreement remain confidential, said Richard Brenneman, a Santa Maria attorney who represented the residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending years of convoluted litigation between the state and federal governments, California has agreed to pay $114.5 million for the cleanup of two infamous toxic dumps, including the Stringfellow acid pits near Riverside, once a receptacle for 35 million gallons of industrial chemicals. Gov. Gray Davis announced Monday that the state will reimburse the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency $99.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending years of convoluted litigation between the state and federal governments, California has agreed to pay $114.5 million for the cleanup of two infamous toxic dumps, including the Stringfellow acid pits near Riverside, once a receptacle for 35 million gallons of industrial chemicals. Gov. Gray Davis announced Monday that the state will reimburse the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency $99.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More toxic barrels have been found buried at the former Casmalia Resources toxic waste dump in Santa Barbara County, and there's evidence that hundreds more may be underground. Work crews last week discovered two barrels beneath a heavy metals landfill they were preparing to permanently seal. The barrels were 13 feet underground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1999 | PAMELA J. JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ernest Carlson was a young doctor when he purchased an auto parts store on Ventura Avenue to bring in extra cash for his growing family. Two decades later federal officials ordered him to remove underground gas tanks on his property, where a service station once stood. He paid $116,000 to have 15 truckloads of dirt hauled to a toxic-waste dump in northern Santa Barbara County. "Then I put it all behind me," said Carlson, now 77 and retired in Santa Paula.
NEWS
June 21, 1995 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Casmalia hazardous waste landfill in northern Santa Barbara County could pose a serious threat to public health and welfare unless more money is spent on maintenance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says in a memo circulated Tuesday. The landfill near Vandenberg Air Force Base was a major dumping ground for Southern California's toxic wastes before it was closed six years ago after bitter community protest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1999 | PAMELA J. JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ernest Carlson was a young doctor when he purchased an auto parts store on Ventura Avenue to bring in extra cash for his growing family. Two decades later federal officials ordered him to remove underground gas tanks on his property, where a service station once stood. He paid $116,000 to have 15 truckloads of dirt hauled to a toxic-waste dump in northern Santa Barbara County. "Then I put it all behind me," said Carlson, now 77 and retired in Santa Paula.
NEWS
June 21, 1995 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Casmalia hazardous waste landfill in northern Santa Barbara County could pose a serious threat to public health and welfare unless more money is spent on maintenance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says in a memo circulated Tuesday. The landfill near Vandenberg Air Force Base was a major dumping ground for Southern California's toxic wastes before it was closed six years ago after bitter community protest.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Warning that a million gallons of toxic waste threatens nearby ground water, the U.S. Department of Justice and Santa Barbara County sued Wednesday to force a sweeping cleanup of a controversial hazardous waste dump near Santa Maria. The double-barreled legal action by county and federal authorities seeks at least $6.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of Casmalia, who blamed a nearby toxic waste dump for health problems in their community, have settled a lawsuit they filed against the dump's owner. Ken Hunter Jr., owner of Casmalia Resources, agreed last week to pay about $10 million to the 320 plaintiffs in the case, sources said. The exact amount could not be determined because Hunter demanded that the terms of the agreement remain confidential, said Richard Brenneman, a Santa Maria attorney who represented the residents.
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