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Hazardous Waste Dumps

NATIONAL
January 27, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Energy Department intends to submit a license application by the end of the year to open a national nuclear waste dump in Nevada, more than a year later than planned, according to President Bush's nominee to head the department. Samuel Bodman's comments on a timetable to use the Yucca Mountain repository came in response to questions from members of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee during confirmation proceedings in Washington.
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NATIONAL
August 11, 2004 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
Sen. John F. Kerry seized upon one of Nevada's longest-running controversies Tuesday, vowing to block creation of a nuclear waste dump at Yucca Mountain and accusing President Bush of breaking his 2000 campaign promise to do the same. "This is not just a Nevada issue," Kerry said. "It's about the relationship between people who lead and people who govern and you, the citizens, the American people."
NATIONAL
July 10, 2004 | From Associated Press
An appeals court on Friday upheld the government's decision to single out Nevada as the site of a nuclear waste dump but ruled that the federal plan did not go far enough to protect people from potential radiation beyond 10,000 years in the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday a $100,000 settlement with a dredging company for ocean dumping violations that occurred during a harbor-deepening project at the Port of Richmond in 1998. Barges used by the Manson Construction Co. of Seattle spilled more than 20,000 cubic yards of dredged material on their way to an EPA-approved ocean disposal site 50 miles west of San Francisco and 9,000 feet deep.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
An Energy Department official had no immediate answers Friday for a congressional panel seeking details of federal plans for shipping spent nuclear reactor fuel to a national radioactive waste dump in Nevada. Gary Lanthrum, director of the department's Office of National Transportation, said the Energy Department would make public in about six weeks whether it will use trains, trucks or a combination of both to get the nation's most radioactive waste to Yucca Mountain.
NATIONAL
November 23, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush broke his campaign promise to Nevadans and rushed ahead with plans to develop a national nuclear waste repository in the state, the speaker of the Nevada Assembly said in the weekly Democratic radio address. The decision by the Bush administration to move forward on the Yucca Mountain project has serious consequences not only for Nevada but for the 38 million Americans who live near the highways and rail lines where the waste will be hauled, Speaker Richard Perkins said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2003 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
Contamination from a hazardous-waste dump on the former El Toro Marine base threatens to complicate the Navy's plan to auction off a portion of the base for new homes this summer. The closed 9-acre dump was used for discarded construction material, and in a recent environmental report, released in draft form, the Navy gave the dump site its worst possible rating for contamination. According to the Navy, that means the land in its present condition cannot be sold or leased.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A San Diego Superior Court judge ruled that US Ecology Inc., the firm that sought unsuccessfully to build a low-level radioactive waste dump in the Mojave Desert near Needles, was not entitled to collect nearly $223 million in expenses and lost profits from the state. When the U.S. Department of the Interior declined to transfer the federally owned site for the dump to California because of unresolved safety issues, the state sued the federal government and lost in 1999. After Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2003 | William Overend, Times Staff Writer
Federal environmental officials, announcing "an important step" in efforts to clean up the Casmalia toxic waste site in northern Santa Barbara County, said Friday that 50 private companies and federal agencies have agreed to pay almost $32 million toward the overall estimated cleanup cost of $272 million.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Current plans for the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain do not include enough space to hold all of the liquid radioactive waste to be produced by the federal government, according to an Energy Department official.
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