Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHazeltine Corp
IN THE NEWS

Hazeltine Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 1989
Two suspended executives of Teledyne Industries Inc., on trial on conspiracy and bribery charges, denied before a jury that they knew a company consultant was funneling payoffs to a senior Navy engineer. George Kaub, contracts vice president for the firm's electronics division, said he never doubted the credentials of consultant William Parkin--even when Parkin proposed taking an illegal contingency fee for helping the firm land a $24-million electronics contract.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The Navy announced Thursday that it has indefinitely suspended Hazeltine Corp. and two of its former employees from doing business with the federal government, following a Jan. 6 decision by the firm and its former executives to plead guilty to charges that they had defrauded the government. Hazeltine, a Long Island, N.Y., electronics firm, is a subsidiary of Emerson Electric Co., the nation's 43rd-largest defense company. In 1988, Hazeltine had sales of $158 million.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
A somber Fred H. Lackner of Woodland Hills, Calif., pleaded guilty Friday to federal conspiracy, wire fraud and bribery charges in the continuing Ill Wind investigation into corruption in Pentagon weapons-buying. Lackner, a 52-year-old free-lance defense consultant, admitted paying about $6,000 in bribes to a Navy official for inside information on military contracts. U.S. District Judge Claude M. Hilton read the three charges to Lackner and asked him how he pleaded.
NEWS
April 7, 1989
Two suspended executives of Teledyne Industries Inc., on trial on conspiracy and bribery charges, denied before a jury that they knew a company consultant was funneling payoffs to a senior Navy engineer. George Kaub, contracts vice president for the firm's electronics division, said he never doubted the credentials of consultant William Parkin--even when Parkin proposed taking an illegal contingency fee for helping the firm land a $24-million electronics contract.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors will ask a federal grand jury today to indict one Southern California defense contractor, a Navy official and two Pentagon lobbyists, sources told The Times, in what would be the first criminal charges to surface in connection with the massive Pentagon procurement scandal that rocked the defense establishment last year. The federal grand jury in Virginia is being asked to return charges of conspiracy, fraud and bribery against a division of Los Angeles-based Teledyne Co.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The government Friday brought the first charges in the Pentagon fraud case, accusing a unit of Teledyne Inc., three Teledyne executives, a Navy official and two defense consultants with crimes that include racketeering, conspiracy, bribery and theft of government property. The indictments followed guilty pleas earlier Friday on similar charges from defense supplier Hazeltine Corp., two of its former officers and a Washington marketing official for Teledyne. Hazeltine agreed to pay $1.
NEWS
September 3, 1988 | Associated Press
A defense consultant at the center of an unfolding Pentagon fraud investigation acknowledged Friday that he paid other consultants for "technical information" on contracts but denied he made payments to government employees. William L. Parkin, a former Navy contracting official who retired in 1983 and set up his own consulting firm, said he began making monthly payments to consultant Fred H. Lackner in late 1986 for information on a pending Navy contract for special aircraft equipment.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
A somber Fred H. Lackner of Woodland Hills, Calif., pleaded guilty Friday to federal conspiracy, wire fraud and bribery charges in the continuing Ill Wind investigation into corruption in Pentagon weapons-buying. Lackner, a 52-year-old free-lance defense consultant, admitted paying about $6,000 in bribes to a Navy official for inside information on military contracts. U.S. District Judge Claude M. Hilton read the three charges to Lackner and asked him how he pleaded.
NEWS
July 1, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Federal investigators, relying heavily on an elaborate network of electronic surveillance, said they were able to track step-by-step the activities of private defense consultants as they bought and sold secret information on defense contracts, according to court documents made public Thursday.
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
A major figure in the Pentagon procurement scandal took an overdose of sleeping pills in an unsuccessful suicide attempt just nine days before his trial on charges of conspiracy, racketeering and fraud was scheduled to begin, police said Monday. Defense consultant William L. Parkin was reported in fair condition at a Virginia hospital after being found unconscious by his daughter early Saturday at his home in Alexandria, Va.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The Navy announced Thursday that it has indefinitely suspended Hazeltine Corp. and two of its former employees from doing business with the federal government, following a Jan. 6 decision by the firm and its former executives to plead guilty to charges that they had defrauded the government. Hazeltine, a Long Island, N.Y., electronics firm, is a subsidiary of Emerson Electric Co., the nation's 43rd-largest defense company. In 1988, Hazeltine had sales of $158 million.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
More than two dozen firms and individuals whose names have emerged in the defense procurement scandal will be reviewed for possible disciplinary action, ranging up to a permanent ban on future Defense Department business, Pentagon sources said Monday.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
The news last summer that consultant William L. Parkin was a subject of the massive federal defense fraud investigation went almost unnoticed amid the uproar over alleged wrongdoing by top Pentagon officials and major defense contractors. Parkin, after all, was an obscure businessman who worked out of his home in suburban Washington. In the Navy he had been only a middle-level official who negotiated contracts from an obscure office in charge of cruise missiles.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The government Friday brought the first charges in the Pentagon fraud case, accusing a unit of Teledyne Inc., three Teledyne executives, a Navy official and two defense consultants with crimes that include racketeering, conspiracy, bribery and theft of government property. The indictments followed guilty pleas earlier Friday on similar charges from defense supplier Hazeltine Corp., two of its former officers and a Washington marketing official for Teledyne. Hazeltine agreed to pay $1.
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
A major figure in the Pentagon procurement scandal took an overdose of sleeping pills in an unsuccessful suicide attempt just nine days before his trial on charges of conspiracy, racketeering and fraud was scheduled to begin, police said Monday. Defense consultant William L. Parkin was reported in fair condition at a Virginia hospital after being found unconscious by his daughter early Saturday at his home in Alexandria, Va.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors will ask a federal grand jury today to indict one Southern California defense contractor, a Navy official and two Pentagon lobbyists, sources told The Times, in what would be the first criminal charges to surface in connection with the massive Pentagon procurement scandal that rocked the defense establishment last year. The federal grand jury in Virginia is being asked to return charges of conspiracy, fraud and bribery against a division of Los Angeles-based Teledyne Co.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|