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NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Kate Mather
Disney officials say they presented "multiple options" to accommodate the religious beliefs of a Muslim woman who is now suing the entertainment giant and claims she unfairly lost her job at a Disneyland Resort café after refusing to remove her head scarf at work. Imane Boudlal, 28, filed a federal lawsuit against Walt Disney Corp. on Monday, saying she was also discriminated against and harassed for her religious beliefs. The lawsuit claims Boudlal, who is a Moroccan native but a naturalized U.S. citizen, contacted her supervisors at the Grand Californian Hotel & Spa's Storyteller's Café in 2010 after she decided to wear her hijab full time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Steve Lopez
In Los Angeles, patrol officers are caught disabling recording equipment that was in place to keep them honest. In Santa Monica, a high school student demonstrates why the wrestling coach is the last faculty member to mess with. And in Glendale, a young woman challenges the definition of "hands-free" driving after getting a ticket for talking on a phone tucked into her head scarf. These three police blotter tales have little in common, except that I've assembled them in a nice spring bouquet, along with a prickly observation or two. First the LAPD.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2012 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
A former Disney employee is expected to announce Monday a federal lawsuit against the entertainment giant, saying she was harassed and unfairly removed from her hostess job after refusing to remove her head scarf while at work. Imane Boudlal, who is Muslim, said she had worked at Storyteller's Cafe in Disney's Grand Californian Hotel & Spa in Anaheim for two years when she began wearing her hijab to work in August 2010. Boudlal said she was told wearing her scarf was a violation of company policy, and she would either have to remove it, cover it with a hat or take a job working out of public sight.
WORLD
March 19, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON - Just five months after she was shot in the head by the Taliban in Pakistan's Swat Valley, apparently for defying a ban on girls' education, Malala Yousafzai returned to school, this time in the safer confines of central England. On her first day in Edgbaston High School for Girls in Birmingham, the teen, who has attracted international attention for her quiet defiance, issued a statement celebrating her accomplishment and expressing concern for others. “I am excited that today I have achieved my dream of going back to school," she said.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A Muslim woman arrested for refusing to take off her head scarf in a courthouse said she felt her human and civil rights were violated. A judge ordered Lisa Valentine, 40, to serve 10 days in jail for contempt of court, said police in Douglasville, an Atlanta suburb. Valentine violated a court policy that prohibits people from wearing headgear in court, police said Tuesday. "I just felt stripped of my civil, my human rights," Valentine said the next day. She was released after the Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations urged the U.S. to investigate, she said.
OPINION
January 21, 2005
Charles K. Sergis wrote that your Jan. 12 story about the hijab was a "positive spin about the slavish Muslim dress code for women" (letter, Jan. 17). I am a Muslim American woman who, at the age of 30, began wearing the head scarf, and I have to say one has to try it for oneself to know how it really feels. It really does feel liberating, but narrow-minded people simply don't understand something that they have no firsthand knowledge about. I have been raised since I was a child in England and then here in the U.S. by thoroughly secularized parents.
WORLD
September 3, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Adorned with delicate makeup, an anchorwoman wearing a head scarf appeared Sunday on Egypt's state television for the first time in its five-decade history. Wearing a cream-colored scarf, Fatma Nabil appeared poised as she read the latest updates on the drafting of Egypt's post-revolution Constitution on the noon news program, followed by a male anchor. Salah Abdel Maksoud, the country's new information minister and a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, announced Saturday that a largely unspoken ban on female news presenters wearing traditional Islamic head scarves was being lifted and that more covered female anchors would follow Nabil on state-owned networks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2007 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
A woman whose Muslim religious practice requires that she cover her head in public sued the Orange County Sheriff's Department on Tuesday, alleging her rights were violated when jail officials forced her to remove a head scarf while locked up for about eight hours. Souhair Khatib filed suit in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, alleging that her right to practice her religion had been violated, causing her "extreme mental and emotional distress."
WORLD
October 29, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Kuwait's highest court ruled that female lawmakers are not obliged by law to wear the head scarf, a blow to Muslim fundamentalists who want to fully impose Sharia, or Islamic law, in this small, oil-rich state. The Constitutional Court dismissed a case raised by a voter who claimed that two of four women elected to parliament in May, Rola Dashti and Aseel Awadhi, cannot be members of the legislature because they don't comply with the Islamic dress code. The other two elected lawmakers wear the head scarf, known as hijab, and clothes that fully cover their arms and legs.
WORLD
June 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Turkey's top court ruled Thursday that Islamic head scarves violate secularism and cannot be allowed at universities, deepening a divide between the country's Islamic-oriented government and secular institutions. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government had tried to allow the scarves at universities as a matter of personal and religious freedom. But the Constitutional Court said the constitutional amendments passed by Parliament in February went against secularism.
WORLD
December 27, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Unlike most women in Afghanistan, Sourya Saleh knows how to drive - but she's taken the wheel only with her brother beside her, out of respect for tradition. Her friend Masooma Hussaini is still learning. Both young women, though, are experts in a more demanding mode of travel: They've flown 204 hours each as pilots of military helicopters. The first female chopper pilots in Afghanistan since the Soviets trained a woman as a pilot in the 1980s, these two young Afghans are pioneers in a land where a resurgent Taliban is determined to deny girls the right to an education, and violence against women is on the rise.
WORLD
September 3, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Adorned with delicate makeup, an anchorwoman wearing a head scarf appeared Sunday on Egypt's state television for the first time in its five-decade history. Wearing a cream-colored scarf, Fatma Nabil appeared poised as she read the latest updates on the drafting of Egypt's post-revolution Constitution on the noon news program, followed by a male anchor. Salah Abdel Maksoud, the country's new information minister and a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, announced Saturday that a largely unspoken ban on female news presenters wearing traditional Islamic head scarves was being lifted and that more covered female anchors would follow Nabil on state-owned networks.
OPINION
August 16, 2012
Re "Woman's lawsuit accuses Disneyland of bias," Aug. 14 If I had broken as many rules at my job as Imane Boudlal did at hers with Disneyland Resort, I would have been fired. There would have been no offer of any other position within my company. Disneyland is a theme park, with employees dressing as "cast members" of a fantasy world. Her supervisors even offered a specially designed scarf (which needed corporate approval). This is bordering on absurd. If Walt Disney Co. settles by paying her off, I may consider not renewing the annual pass I have had for more years than I can count.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2012 | Kate Mather
Imane Boudlal got a job two weeks after moving to California, a hostess position at a Disneyland Resort cafe. She didn't log many hours at first -- it was April, the slow season -- but as the summer of 2008 progressed, the 24-year-old worked more frequently as the Grand Californian Hotel & Spa's Storyteller's Cafe drew more tourists. It was also, Boudlal alleges in a lawsuit filed Monday, when her co-workers began taunting her, calling the Moroccan-born Muslim a "terrorist," a "camel" and someone who learned how to make bombs at her mosque.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2012 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
A former Disney employee is expected to announce Monday a federal lawsuit against the entertainment giant, saying she was harassed and unfairly removed from her hostess job after refusing to remove her head scarf while at work. Imane Boudlal, who is Muslim, said she had worked at Storyteller's Cafe in Disney's Grand Californian Hotel & Spa in Anaheim for two years when she began wearing her hijab to work in August 2010. Boudlal said she was told wearing her scarf was a violation of company policy, and she would either have to remove it, cover it with a hat or take a job working out of public sight.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Kate Mather
Disney officials say they presented "multiple options" to accommodate the religious beliefs of a Muslim woman who is now suing the entertainment giant and claims she unfairly lost her job at a Disneyland Resort café after refusing to remove her head scarf at work. Imane Boudlal, 28, filed a federal lawsuit against Walt Disney Corp. on Monday, saying she was also discriminated against and harassed for her religious beliefs. The lawsuit claims Boudlal, who is a Moroccan native but a naturalized U.S. citizen, contacted her supervisors at the Grand Californian Hotel & Spa's Storyteller's Café in 2010 after she decided to wear her hijab full time.
WORLD
September 3, 2004 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
The first day of school is never easy. But the start of classes Thursday was especially tough for French Muslim mothers such as Nissia. As a new ban on Islamic head scarves in public schools took effect, Nissia, a short, slim woman who speaks French with an Arabic accent, reluctantly decided to let her teenage daughter comply with the law.
WORLD
December 14, 2010 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
In the sacred Shiite city of Najaf, where women hide themselves behind dark robes and head scarves, 15-year-old Ban wears the wrong kind of black. She likes dark, ripped gloves, silver butterfly shirts and white dice on a chain. She paints her nails black and brushes on matching eye shadow. Ban is an emo, belonging to a subculture that may have gone mainstream in the rest of the world, but sure hasn't here. She pronounces it "emu. " Either way, it means she's a goth with a fondness for sparkle.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
JetBlue Airways blamed a computer glitch for an 18-month-old girl being removed from a plane in Fort Lauderdale , Fla., because the carrier's employees thought she was on the no-fly list. The girl and her parents were removed after the flight bound for Newark, N.J., had boarded, media reports say. In a statement made Thursday, JetBlue said it was looking into the incident that happened Tuesday. It also said its employees "followed appropriate protocols" and included an apology to the family.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2011
UNDERRATED Bill Callahan's "Apocalypse": Known to lo-fi devotees by his frequent recording alias Smog, Callahan took another step forward with his latest album released last month. A collection of churning and troubled Americana with an unfussily poetic backbone, "Apocalypse" weaves through flashes of woozy feedback, delicate piano and Callahan's trance-like guitar, leaving ample space for his deep and deadpan vocals, as darkly assured as an oncoming storm. "Talking Funny" on HBO: Still available in reruns, this one-off chat hosted by Ricky Gervais is a seriously funny summit meeting among some of the top minds in stand-up today.
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