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Head Scarf

WORLD
January 23, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Kuwait's only female national politician survived an ouster attempt by conservative lawmakers who accused her of mismanagement and endangering traditional religious values. Hundreds of women applauded and ululated in the galleries as parliament voted 27 to 19, with two abstentions, against the impeachment of Education Minister Nouria Subeih. Subeih, wearing a black pantsuit and lacking the Muslim head scarf nearly all women wear in Kuwait, stood and waved to the crowds, while lawmakers shook her hand.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2007 | Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writer
A 29-year-old Muslim woman sued San Bernardino County and its sheriff Wednesday, alleging that deputies violated her rights by forcing her to remove the head scarf she wears because of her religious beliefs. The American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Southern California filed the complaint on behalf of Jameelah Medina in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2007 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
A woman whose Muslim religious practice requires that she cover her head in public sued the Orange County Sheriff's Department on Tuesday, alleging her rights were violated when jail officials forced her to remove a head scarf while locked up for about eight hours. Souhair Khatib filed suit in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, alleging that her right to practice her religion had been violated, causing her "extreme mental and emotional distress."
OPINION
May 29, 2005 | Cara Anna, Cara Anna is a freelance writer in New York.
After living several months with Muslims in rural Pakistan last year, I saw the birth of my inner mullah. And it hasn't gone away. By "mullah," I mean the leaders who want to tie Pakistan and the Muslim world to a strict reading of Islamic law. I mean the people who were restrained by police last weekend in Lahore as hundreds of women staged a historic run for women's rights, jogging in street clothes and even high heels through the city. Women in sports isn't un-Islamic, the runners said.
OPINION
January 21, 2005
Charles K. Sergis wrote that your Jan. 12 story about the hijab was a "positive spin about the slavish Muslim dress code for women" (letter, Jan. 17). I am a Muslim American woman who, at the age of 30, began wearing the head scarf, and I have to say one has to try it for oneself to know how it really feels. It really does feel liberating, but narrow-minded people simply don't understand something that they have no firsthand knowledge about. I have been raised since I was a child in England and then here in the U.S. by thoroughly secularized parents.
WORLD
January 12, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
She was a 25-year-old journalist with a bare head and big dreams when things started to turn sour. She got married and ended up divorced the same year. Then the stigma set in. Men knew she wasn't a virgin and stalked her as easy prey. She lost her job when the editor of her newspaper was jailed. Two years ago, lonesome and aimless, Hoda Abdel Wahab fell into a depression so deep she was afraid of becoming paralyzed. "I thought, 'Nothing is worth it in this life, so I'll go to God,' " she says.
WORLD
September 3, 2004 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
The first day of school is never easy. But the start of classes Thursday was especially tough for French Muslim mothers such as Nissia. As a new ban on Islamic head scarves in public schools took effect, Nissia, a short, slim woman who speaks French with an Arabic accent, reluctantly decided to let her teenage daughter comply with the law.
OPINION
January 4, 2004 | Diane Johnson
France has agonized for years about whether and how to discourage Islamic girls from wearing the hijab, or head scarf, in public schools -- something more and more students have taken to doing, claiming religious obligation, fashion or simply that it's a matter of individual rights. It is a practice that has grown more confrontational as European and American relations with the Islamic world have worsened.
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