Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHead Shop
IN THE NEWS

Head Shop

NEWS
July 28, 2005 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
It's is a quintessential slice of Southern California, snuggled against soaring San Gabriel peaks, a place where deer graze in frontyards and bears are known to wander by. It's a town known for exquisitely maintained and highly admired homes that exemplify the best of Craftsman and Victorian design. An old-fashioned main street -- home to idiosyncratic and independent retailers -- thrives. Summer nights are hot; winter days are cool. Old Route 66 runs through it. Pasadena? Hardly.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cypress Hill is in control. Control, y'all. That's secret No. 1 to being a rap group with 10 successful years behind you, in a ruthlessly trendy industry where new acts come and go with hummingbird speed. Secret No. 2, they say, is the support of cannabis smokers the world over. No joke. As was the case with the Grateful Dead, the evil weed is a cornerstone of Cypress Hill's lyrics and stage show, and lead rapper B-Real credits a huge core fan base of potheads for his group's enduring success.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Patssi Valdez's current exhibition at Cal State Northridge finds her a far more pensive artist than she appeared in her beginnings. Her roots are in East L.A., Garfield High and the conceptual and performance art group of the troubled early '70s, Asco. That's Spanish for "nausea." In those days her aesthetic co-conspirators were Gronk, Harry Gamboa Jr., Humberto Sandoval and Willie Herron. Valdez was inclined to express herself through a form of body art that might be called flash-trash glamour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fairfax High School students and their parents fumed when they spied the new store that opened for business Friday in front of their campus. Across Melrose Avenue from the school's main entrance was a 1960s-style head shop stocked with water pipes, drug-themed T-shirts and cigarettes. "This is disgusting. They're marketing to teens. We already have a drug problem," said Kehiante McKinley, a 17-year-old senior who stared in disbelief at the bright red "Smoke Shop" sign over the storefront.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | KRISTINE MCKENNA
Art critic Harold Rosenberg once described the 20th Century as "an epoch of false appearances and aimless adventures" and this ambitious exercise in curating, titled "Post Pop Art," is an apt illustration of his point. Attempting to refurbish the familiar and reinvest it with meaning, the show leaves you feeling as though you've been held captive in an after-hours club for weeks on end.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1985 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
In an art world susceptible to novelty, a critic has many encounters of the weird kind, but this week marked a first. A critic found an artwork that threw up on him. It happened thus: Critic on routine patrol at the Otis/Parsons gallery, reviewing the exhibition "San Francisco Science Fiction," approached artwork, note pad in hand.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyer Ron Minkin, once the defender of men who shipped tons of marijuana into this country from such places as Thailand and Colombia, is a most unlikely volunteer in the war on drugs. For 15 years, Minkin smoked his clients' dope, shared their lavish meals, became godfather to their children. And as his core clientele of hippie dealers moved from small-time street deals on the Sunset Strip and became international drug barons, they paid him millions to keep them out of prison.
NEWS
September 17, 1986 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The night he and Kyle Konz broke into Darrell Kessinger's home in South Beach across the bridge from town, Tom Kirby knew that if they caught him he would do time. He already had had one burglary conviction up in Portland. After his arrest for this one, his lawyer told him he would probably get three to six months in state prison. They were wrong. Lincoln County Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As soon as the radio broadcast the news of Jerry Garcia's death Wednesday morning, Jeff Mitchell drove to a Reseda head shop where Grateful Dead memorabilia and tie-dyed shirts cover the walls. Mitchell was joined by dozens of the band's loyal fans, people seeking the sympathy of compatriots in a time of need. They gravitated toward counterculture outlets and record stores around the San Fernando Valley, and to Griffith Park for an evening vigil.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|