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Head Shop

NEWS
May 21, 1989 | Elliott Almond \f7
In 1966, John Griggs robbed a man of LSD at gunpoint, according to a former friend's testimony before a grand jury. The act dramatically changed Griggs' life. A week later, Glen Lynd testified in 1973 before the Orange County Grand Jury, Griggs experimented with the LSD, "threw away his gun and was running around hollering, 'This is it.' That's how it all began." Lynd in 1973 was describing the origins of the Laguna Beach-based Brotherhood of Eternal Love, which by then was alleged to be an international drug ring.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
Jack Herer, an energetic advocate for marijuana legalization who was a mesmerizing presence on the Venice Boardwalk and achieved worldwide renown after he wrote a treatise extolling the virtues of hemp, died April 15. He was 70. Herer suffered a debilitating heart attack in September, minutes after he delivered a typically pugnacious pro-pot speech at the Hempstalk festival in Portland, Ore., insisting that marijuana ought to be smoked morning, noon...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | KRISTINE MCKENNA
Art critic Harold Rosenberg once described the 20th Century as "an epoch of false appearances and aimless adventures" and this ambitious exercise in curating, titled "Post Pop Art," is an apt illustration of his point. Attempting to refurbish the familiar and reinvest it with meaning, the show leaves you feeling as though you've been held captive in an after-hours club for weeks on end.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1985 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
In an art world susceptible to novelty, a critic has many encounters of the weird kind, but this week marked a first. A critic found an artwork that threw up on him. It happened thus: Critic on routine patrol at the Otis/Parsons gallery, reviewing the exhibition "San Francisco Science Fiction," approached artwork, note pad in hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As soon as the radio broadcast the news of Jerry Garcia's death Wednesday morning, Jeff Mitchell drove to a Reseda head shop where Grateful Dead memorabilia and tie-dyed shirts cover the walls. Mitchell was joined by dozens of the band's loyal fans, people seeking the sympathy of compatriots in a time of need. They gravitated toward counterculture outlets and record stores around the San Fernando Valley, and to Griffith Park for an evening vigil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | LISA MASCARO
Andrea Marchetti, who runs a gift shop that just moved to the Balboa Fun Zone, says that her best customers can sometimes cause her the most harm. "They start asking other businesses, 'Where's the Head Shop?' " said Marchetti, whose family operated such a shop in Huntington Beach for 15 years before moving to Balboa last weekend. "We don't want that. I don't know what else to do. We just want to be a gift shop."
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | BLAIR GOLSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only a select few have ever seen the green platform shoes that an undercover federal agent wore to help him infiltrate Detroit's drug-and-disco scene in the 1970s. And it's likely that many baby boomers have forgotten about the creativity their generation used to craft mayonnaise bottles into bongs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fairfax High School students and their parents fumed when they spied the new store that opened for business Friday in front of their campus. Across Melrose Avenue from the school's main entrance was a 1960s-style head shop stocked with water pipes, drug-themed T-shirts and cigarettes. "This is disgusting. They're marketing to teens. We already have a drug problem," said Kehiante McKinley, a 17-year-old senior who stared in disbelief at the bright red "Smoke Shop" sign over the storefront.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyer Ron Minkin, once the defender of men who shipped tons of marijuana into this country from such places as Thailand and Colombia, is a most unlikely volunteer in the war on drugs. For 15 years, Minkin smoked his clients' dope, shared their lavish meals, became godfather to their children. And as his core clientele of hippie dealers moved from small-time street deals on the Sunset Strip and became international drug barons, they paid him millions to keep them out of prison.
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