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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1996
Re your July 24 article regarding migraine headaches and their response to topical anesthetic nosedrops: The implication is that lidocaine has a direct effect on the headache; I do not agree with this. For years I have been using topical anesthetics and vasoconstrictors (lidocaine and Afrin) as test vehicles to monitor reaction to severe headache symptoms. The patients who respond quickly invariably have compressive anatomy in their nasal cavities, i.e. bone spurs, soft tissue swelling, etc. Removal or surgical modification of these structures frequently eradicates these painful "rhinogenic headaches" permanently.
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SCIENCE
March 11, 2014 | By Monte Morin
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the marketing of an electronic medical device intended to treat migraine headaches. In an announcement released Tuesday, officials said the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, or TENS, device was the first ever to receive such approval. The device, which will be marketed under the name Cefaly , is manufactured by Cefaly Technology of Belgium. "Cefaly provides an alternative to medication for migraine prevention," read a prepared statement from Christy Foreman, director of the Office of Device Evaluation at the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
It's well known that a spoonful of Sriracha, an Asian hot sauce made by Huy Fong Foods, can burn your mouth. But in Irwindale, where the hot sauce's production facilities are, residents are complaining of burning eyes, irritated throats and headaches caused by a powerful, painful odor that the city says appears to be emanating from the factory during production. The smell is so aggressive that one family was forced to move a birthday party indoors after the spicy odor descended on the festivities, said Irwindale City Atty.
SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Stress is known to trigger headaches. Now it gets worse: Researchers have found that the more intense a person's stress, the more time he or she will spend in pain. The findings are based on data from the German Headache Consortium Study. Researchers interviewed 5,159 adults about their headache history and other health factors once every three months from 2010 to  2012. Among other things, volunteers were asked to rate the intensity of their stress on a 100-point scale. Tension headaches - the most common type - were the most sensitive to stress, the researchers found.
HEALTH
July 26, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Two years ago, I was getting headaches every day for several months. I visited five different doctors, but none had a clue as to the reason, and they weren't any help. I then read about a lady who had written to you. She said her headaches stopped when she stopped eating wheat, oats, barley and rye. The next day I quit, and so did the headaches. Other readers with chronic headaches should try not eating gluten and see if it helps. Migraine headaches are an often-unrecognized symptom of celiac disease.
SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Stress is known to trigger headaches. Now it gets worse: Researchers have found that the more intense a person's stress, the more time he or she will spend in pain. The findings are based on data from the German Headache Consortium Study. Researchers interviewed 5,159 adults about their headache history and other health factors once every three months from 2010 to  2012. Among other things, volunteers were asked to rate the intensity of their stress on a 100-point scale. Tension headaches - the most common type - were the most sensitive to stress, the researchers found.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before the fantasy football draft. The Skinny: I've become addicted to the pink grapefruit-flavored Sparkling Ice. Every time I go to Ralph's I buy out the stock. Try it! Tuesday's headlines include a look at how China is infuriating Hollywood, Katie Couric gets ready for daytime and Walt Disney Co. is on a roll. Daily Dose: The Saturday night before the Emmy Awards just got a little more crowded. For years, NBC and Showtime have had big parties that night.
TRAVEL
March 17, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm
Question: Two years ago, I traveled to Tibet, including Lhasa at 11,975 feet above sea level. I started having mild headaches. Two weeks later, as the plane was landing in San Francisco, I became non-responsive. I underwent a craniotomy to relieve pressure from a clot next to my brain. I've had other altitude issues, including passing out while snowshoeing near Mammoth and experiencing altitude sickness after leaving Cuzco, Peru. I know commercial flights are pressurized above sea level, and I have taken some domestic flights.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Botox, the botulism-based drug that has wiped wrinkles from the faces of millions, may be approved for another use: stopping headaches. Drug maker Allergan Inc. said Thursday that it had new evidence that its injectable drug could help relieve migraine headaches. Based on preliminary results from two company-funded studies, Allergan said it would ask the Food and Drug Administration to approve Botox for chronic migraine next year. The FDA approved Botox to smooth wrinkles and age lines in 2002, and it has grown into a blockbuster product for Irvine-based Allergan, with $2.1 billion in sales last year.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
Are teens with poor health habits more likely to come down with migraines and other types of headaches? Or do headaches prompt teens to do unhealthy things, like smoke and spend too much time in front of the TV? These are the questions raised by a new study of risk factors associated headaches among 5,847 Norwegian teenagers. The 13- to 18-year-olds were all participants in a nationwide health study aimed at junior high and high school students in the 1990s. In addition to being weighed and measured, the teens spent an hour answering a variety of health-related questions.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia - It was 2:30 a.m. and the stranger on the other side of the door wanted into my hotel room. "How many cards do you have?" he kept asking in broken English. The lock rattled and eventfully broke. Still hazy from sleep, I did all I could to keep him from forcing the door open. Finally, he backed away as more footsteps hurried down the hall. A new speaker identified himself as the hotel manager. He said the late-night intruder was a locksmith mistakenly sent to change the lock.
SCIENCE
December 27, 2013 | By Monte Morin
It was a day of headaches and broken records for two Russian spacewalkers Friday as the cosmonauts spent over eight hours installing two cameras on the exterior of the International Space Station, only to remove them when they failed to work. "Back and forth back and forth," quipped one of the cosmonauts as they hauled the two bulky cameras back into a space station airlock. "It was actually easier to take it out than put it in. " Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy had installed the two cameras ahead of schedule, but had to reverse course when the cameras failed to transmit telemetry and other data to ground controllers.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
NEW YORK Santa, it seemed, was difficult to escape in parts of this snow-coated city Saturday. He was eating a burrito at Chipotle. He was getting money out of the ATM. He was buying Gatorade at Walgreens. But most of all, he was drinking at various bars throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn as part of SantaCon, an annual Santa-themed bar crawl. SantaCon has occurred for years, but after a few particularly rowdy parties, the event has gotten the city in a tizzy. Many New Yorkers this year expressed concerns about the level of booziness at SantaCon, which draws 30,000 people to New York and has been known to feature Santas puking, shouting and urinating publicly all over town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Hector Becerra and Jessica Garrison
Jesse Bracamontes is one of the legions of Sriracha hot sauce fans who squirts the bright red paste of peppers, garlic and spices on all manner of foods: pizza, take-out Chinese and even a plain bowl of noodles. But when the pungent Sriracha smell wafts into the frontyard of his Irwindale home, he says his nose runs and he feels a little sick. "It feels a little like pepper spray," he said. Bracamontes lives a short walk from Sriracha's bustling new plant in Irwindale, which can produce up to 200,000 bottles of the hot sauce each day. The company moved there last year in response to heavy global demand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
It's well known that a spoonful of Sriracha, an Asian hot sauce made by Huy Fong Foods, can burn your mouth. But in Irwindale, where the hot sauce's production facilities are, residents are complaining of burning eyes, irritated throats and headaches caused by a powerful, painful odor that the city says appears to be emanating from the factory during production. The smell is so aggressive that one family was forced to move a birthday party indoors after the spicy odor descended on the festivities, said Irwindale City Atty.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Dancing around an obvious question, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie showed some rather deft footwork earlier this week. In a debate Tuesday night against his overmatched Democratic opponent, state Sen. Barbara Buono, the Republican faced the inevitable query about his ambitions beyond winning reelection to a second term in November. As in: What about that all-but-declared bid for president in 2016? “I can walk and chew gum at the same time,” Christie said. “I can do this job and also deal with my future.
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Women are 15% more likely than men to get tension headaches, a study found. And the more education people have, the more headaches they get. The study from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. looked at the routine headaches with rubberband-like pressure. It was based on a 1993-94 telephone survey of 13,345 people in Baltimore County. The study's lead author, Dr.
HEALTH
June 14, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Children with frequent headaches may need to rethink their use of nonprescription medications. About one in five young headache sufferers overuses the drugs, although the problem frequently isn't discovered until Mom or Dad finds a half-empty bottle of acetaminophen, aspirin or ibuprofen, says Dr. A. David Rothner, a pediatric neurologist at the Cleveland Clinic. In a study of 680 headache patients ages 6 to 18, Rothner found that 22% were overusing nonprescription pain relievers.
SPORTS
October 4, 2013 | By David Wharton
Faced with continuing criticism over their decision to hold the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, international soccer leaders have concluded a two-day meeting by deciding to put off any immediate decisions. Qatar was a controversial choice from the start, if only because the Persian Gulf can be oppressively hot in summer. More recently, there have been reports of widespread labor violations in that country. After meeting in Zurich, members of FIFA's executive committee said Friday they will begin a consultation process to further examine moving the summertime tournament to a winter date in 2022.
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