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WORLD
February 8, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
Viktor Yanukovich, the former mechanic who just six years ago was shunned as a pro-Moscow stooge, declared victory in Ukraine's presidential election Sunday after early exit polls showed him leading by a slim margin. Three exit polls showed Yanukovich leading by 4 to 5 percentage points in a runoff election that threatens to deepen political instability in the contentious former Soviet state. His opponent, Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, refused to concede, and the numbers were being bitterly argued into the early hours Monday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2010 | Patrick J. McDonnell
A suspected financial swindler who allegedly boasted he was the brother of former Mexican President Vicente Fox pleaded not guilty Monday to charges of stealing more than $600,000 through bogus investment plans, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. Alfredo Trujillo Fox, 66, was arrested Saturday on a felony complaint and was being held in lieu of $1-million bail, said Jane Robison, a spokeswoman for the district attorney's office. He was arraigned Monday on 15 counts of grand theft, 15 counts of unqualified sales of securities, 15 counts of misrepresentation in sales of securities and two counts of tax evasion.
WORLD
January 30, 2010 | By Henry Chu
Defending the most controversial decision of his career -- if not his life -- former British Prime Minister Tony Blair declared Friday that he had no regrets over going to war in Iraq, calling it the right decision in a post-Sept. 11 world and one he "would take again." For more than six hours, Blair gave a stout defense of the war before an investigative panel whose proceedings were televised nationwide in a riveting moment of political theater. Britons who ditched soap operas and game shows to watch their former leader submit to a prolonged public grilling saw Blair insist that he tried to resolve the standoff with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein diplomatically, that he made the best judgment he could and that the Iraqi people are better off for it. "I had to take this decision as prime minister.
WORLD
January 17, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
Yulia Tymoshenko has fought her way out of poverty, out of jail, out of standoffs with Russia. She's fought in the streets and in parliament; through communism, post-communism and a messy, primordial democracy. Admirers and detractors alike tend to say one thing about the Ukrainian prime minister with the golden braid wound like a crown over her brow: Tymoshenko knows how to fight. And now her biggest battle is heading for a climax as Ukrainians go to the polls today to elect a new president.
WORLD
January 16, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
Five years after he was discounted as Moscow's stooge and shunted to the margins of Ukrainian politics, Viktor Yanukovich has regained his lost prestige -- and then some. To the surprise of many, the towering, plain-spoken politician has emerged as the clear front-runner in the presidential vote to be held Sunday. His popularity represents a remarkable reversal of fortunes: In 2004, Ukraine's presidential election dissolved into massive street protests and widespread outrage when the Supreme Court ruled that Yanukovich, then the prime minister, had won the election fraudulently.
WORLD
December 20, 2009 | By Gaelle Faure
Former French President Jacques Chirac has been hit with a second investigation of allegations that he used public funds while he was mayor of Paris to pay political allies for jobs that didn't exist. The former president, who lost his constitutional immunity when he left office in 2007, already has been ordered to stand trial in a separate investigation of the allegations. After he was questioned by an investigative judge Friday, the former president's office said in a statement that he responded two years ago to questions about seven allegedly fake jobs and that no new elements had emerged since then.
WORLD
December 18, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Reporting from Copenhagen — President Obama exhorted world leaders at international climate talks to "recognize it is better to act than talk" and seal a framework agreement on controlling greenhouse gases. In a relatively brief speech to a session of more than 100 heads of state from around the world, Obama sketched the pillars of a possible deal: commitments by industrialized and fast-growing countries to limit emissions, a way of monitoring whether countries keep their emissions commitments and a grand aid package to help poor nations adapt to climate change and transition to low-emission energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2009 | By Paloma Esquivel
While Honduras' de facto government observed elections more than 2,000 miles away on Sunday, Honduran citizens in Los Angeles headed to a local school to make their voices heard -- one way or another. Inside the Evans Community Adult School downtown, dozens of poll workers representing various political parties manned ballot stations. Across the street, protesters denounced what they called a fraudulent vote and urged a boycott. The presidential elections, which take place every four years, have been a source of tension since President Manuel Zelaya was ousted in a coup June 28 and deported to Costa Rica.
WORLD
November 30, 2009 | By Alex Renderos and Tracy Wilkinson
Reporting from Mexico City and Tegucigalpa, Honduras -- Hondurans voted Sunday for a new president, many hoping that despite the questions surrounding the election they could restore legitimacy to their national government five months after a military-backed coup ousted President Manuel Zelaya. Official results late Sunday gave an insurmountable lead to Porfirio Lobo, a wealthy businessman from Honduras' political elite and candidate of the conservative National Party. His closest opponent conceded defeat.
WORLD
October 15, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
Backers of the coup against Manuel Zelaya made progress Wednesday in negotiations with representatives of the ousted Honduran president, but the key point, Zelaya's reinstatement, remained unresolved. Victor Meza, negotiating on Zelaya's behalf, said delegations representing the two factions had agreed on wording regarding that sticking point. But later, the de facto government of Roberto Micheletti, who replaced Zelaya, said no agreement had been reached. "The dialogue on this point has been cordial and both sides have made important advances," said a statement from the delegation representing Micheletti, according to news reports.
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