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NEWS
May 9, 1989 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Just when you thought you had your workout routine down pat--from the right shoes to the right music--comes this unnerving caveat: Using headset stereos while exercising may be hazardous to your hearing. So says Richard Navarro, a speech pathologist and audiologist at the University of Nevada-Reno who recently evaluated the decibel levels of 51 tape players. When the stereos were played at one-third volume, Navarro found the average level to be 85--a potentially dangerous one, according to hearing experts.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
It's long been the stuff of science fiction, the ability to wear a headset and feel as if you're in another world. Creating an affordable virtual reality device for the mass market has been the holy grail of sorts for game developers and futurists. Now Facebook's $2-billion purchase of Oculus may bring that dream one step closer to reality. Virtual reality enthusiasts say they've been waiting for decades for the technology to take off and have been developing headsets and content in the hopes they could soon have mainstream appeal.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
LAS VEGAS -- It was as if Charles Xavier himself held court on the CES showroom floor, sending drones flying with just his mind. Except that the X-Man in question was a middle-aged Asian convention attendee wearing a brain-wave-reading headset from NeuroSky. The 8-year-old San Jose company hopes to turn electrical impulses produced by customers' gray matter into a mainstream consumer brand by pairing its headset with gadgets and games dreamed up by outside developers.   Those include Steve Castellotti, the young chief executive of Puzzlebox, who put his mind-controlled spherical helicopter Orbit on Kickstarter in November hoping to raise $10,000.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Facebook said it would buy virtual reality company Oculus VR for about $2 billion in cash and stock. Oculus is the Irvine, Calif., maker of the Rift headset. The company will continue to operate independently within Facebook, Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said in a blog post. With the purchase, the giant social network is focusing on “what platforms will come next to enable even more useful, entertaining and personal experiences,” Zuckerberg said. When you put on the Oculus headset, “you enter a completely immersive computer-generated environment, like a game or a movie scene or a place far away,” Zuckerberg said.
SPORTS
August 10, 2002
With all due respect, at least one good thing has come with Chick Hearn's passing. It has allowed the public to bear witness to the fact that T.J. Simers, like the Tin Man, does indeed possess a heart. While reading Page Two on Wednesday, one could almost hear the drip of tears on Simers' keyboard as he wrote his touching ode. Chick is probably looking down from above right now, smiling, headset in place, knowing that his final act on earth caused the mustard to come off the biggest hot dog of all. John R. Grush Mission Viejo
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1990
It was with amazement and disgust that I read of Steve Sun's dispute with United Airlines over the use of his personal headset to listen to an in-flight movie without paying the $4 fee (Metro, Nov. 10). It is unbelievable that he actually thought the fee charged by the airline was to "rent" the headset when it is so obvious that the fee is to "listen" to the movie. And why, after being so informed, did he continue to listen to the movie without paying the $4 fee? If he is intelligent enough to know "what you can and can't do on an airplane," why did he choose to so blatantly disregard this rule?
SPORTS
November 11, 2012 | By Dan Loumena
Texas Tech Coach Tommy Tuberville was none too happy to be locked in a battle with lowly Kansas on Saturday, and his frustration came to the surface when he appeared to strike assistant Kevin Oliver after the team drew a penalty when it couldn't get the right special-teams personnel on the field. Tuberville said after the game that he was merely trying to pull his assistant off the field by grabbing his shirt, presumably by the collar since he managed to whack Oliver's headset to the ground with a big swipe of his hand.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been corrected. See note below.
A "Star Wars" fan has made a video game that lets players throw virtual objects with their minds, but he's having trouble selling it because people don't believe it works. "One blogger that I reached out to accused me of fabricating the entire thing," said Lat Ware, a 28-year-old game developer in Sunnyvale, Calif. But Ware assures us that "Throw Trucks With Your Mind!," the game he is trying to fund on Kickstarter , is no hoax. Ware let VentureBeat test the game, and after the demo, the tech website's reporter proclaimed he was a Jedi Master.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Facebook said it would buy virtual reality company Oculus VR for about $2 billion in cash and stock. Oculus is the Irvine, Calif., maker of the Rift headset. The company will continue to operate independently within Facebook, Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said in a blog post. With the purchase, the giant social network is focusing on “what platforms will come next to enable even more useful, entertaining and personal experiences,” Zuckerberg said. When you put on the Oculus headset, “you enter a completely immersive computer-generated environment, like a game or a movie scene or a place far away,” Zuckerberg said.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | LYNN SIMROSS
If you're looking for a neater way to eat spaghetti, there's a new utensil you may want to consider--the rotating pasta forchetta. That's Italian for fork, but this isn't Italian. It's a fork with a crank handle. Although most pasta aficionados probably would shun such a device, others may find it refreshingly utilitarian.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been corrected. See note below.
A "Star Wars" fan has made a video game that lets players throw virtual objects with their minds, but he's having trouble selling it because people don't believe it works. "One blogger that I reached out to accused me of fabricating the entire thing," said Lat Ware, a 28-year-old game developer in Sunnyvale, Calif. But Ware assures us that "Throw Trucks With Your Mind!," the game he is trying to fund on Kickstarter , is no hoax. Ware let VentureBeat test the game, and after the demo, the tech website's reporter proclaimed he was a Jedi Master.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
LAS VEGAS -- It was as if Charles Xavier himself held court on the CES showroom floor, sending drones flying with just his mind. Except that the X-Man in question was a middle-aged Asian convention attendee wearing a brain-wave-reading headset from NeuroSky. The 8-year-old San Jose company hopes to turn electrical impulses produced by customers' gray matter into a mainstream consumer brand by pairing its headset with gadgets and games dreamed up by outside developers.   Those include Steve Castellotti, the young chief executive of Puzzlebox, who put his mind-controlled spherical helicopter Orbit on Kickstarter in November hoping to raise $10,000.
SPORTS
November 11, 2012 | By Dan Loumena
Texas Tech Coach Tommy Tuberville was none too happy to be locked in a battle with lowly Kansas on Saturday, and his frustration came to the surface when he appeared to strike assistant Kevin Oliver after the team drew a penalty when it couldn't get the right special-teams personnel on the field. Tuberville said after the game that he was merely trying to pull his assistant off the field by grabbing his shirt, presumably by the collar since he managed to whack Oliver's headset to the ground with a big swipe of his hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The man who goes by CrossXBones finagled his way into the center of the scrum. Sweat beaded on his shaved head, an American Spirit cigarette dangled from his mouth and a massive can of energy drink was holstered on the strap of his backpack. Hundreds of protesters had taken over the parking lot in front of police headquarters in Anaheim, where police shootings over the summer had stirred anger in the densely packed neighborhoods in the heart of Orange County's largest city. Protesters scrawled messages in chalk condemning police and chanted as officers on horseback galloped by. But CrossXBones, as Sky Adams is known online, was not one of them.
SPORTS
October 26, 2009 | Sam Farmer
Sometimes there are head games between bitter NFL rivals. Between the Washington Redskins and Philadelphia Eagles tonight? Headset games. Sherm Lewis has the headset for the Redskins, who have yet to score more than 17 points in a game. He was hired recently as an offensive consultant and assumed play-calling duties this week when they were stripped from Coach Jim Zorn. That wasn't the only audible the Redskins called. They also benched quarterback Jason Campbell for Todd Collins in a 14-6 loss to Kansas City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
The first time someone snatched the speech processor from behind her son's ear, Hilda Giron got it back. She had been shopping for groceries and shouted to the cashier to watch 3-year-old Jose while she took off after the young thief and his accomplice. The boys probably thought they had grabbed a Bluetooth headset, which are in high demand now that California requires drivers to use hands-free cellphones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1986
I have subscribed to The Times for 25 years and have read it, or in it, off and on for a longer time than that, so I am answering your ad, which invited readers to tell what they think of the paper. I like it. It has a nice format, attractive to look at, inviting to read. It is well organized and covers a lot of journalistic territory. If I'm sick of news, I can read about food or see what Jack Smith has to say, or see if any of the readers in Letters to the Editor are more prejudiced than I. A thing I particularly like and can't live without is the news summary on Page 2 every day but Saturday.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
An Oceanside man was killed instantly Monday afternoon when he rode his bicycle into the path of an Amtrak train, authorities said. The bicyclist, identified as Brian Throckmorton, who was believed to be about 36, apparently was listening to music on a headset and did not hear the northbound train, said John Armendariz, an investigator for the San Diego County coroner's office. "He must have had the volume turned up because he never looked at the train," Armendariz said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2006 | Darragh Johnson, Washington Post
Crazy? Or cellphone? It's the latest sidewalk game in the urban canyon: On K Street, a guy in a tie screams at the air, "Who do you think you are?" In Dupont Circle, a woman downing dainty bites of a muffin ponders, seemingly to no one, "Ummm, no." Then, more confidently, "No." Outside the Capitol, a dapper young man circles a patch of sidewalk, stabs his pen at a notebook and jabbers whispered words to the ground. Crazy? Or cellphone?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2006 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
In Hollywood, you're nobody till somebody listens in. Forget the allegations of illegal celebrity wiretaps gone wild. In the trenches where the deals go down, it can fairly be assumed that any time an agent is on the phone with, say, a studio executive, four people, not two, will be on the line -- the agent, the exec, the agent's assistant and the exec's assistant. Anyone who expects a conversation to be private is either not paying attention or is hopelessly naive.
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