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December 11, 1988
In her interesting review of Anne Roiphe's "A Season For Healing," Elaine Kendall fails to mention the coincidence that the word roiphe itself means healer in Hebrew. Perhaps the reviewer was unaware of it. Nor do I know if author Roiphe herself calls attention to it in the book itself, since I have not as yet read it. In any case, the author seems to come by the title of her book by right, her progenitors having bequeathed it to her. BEN SHREIBER Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 20, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
Just a few blocks from the Boston Marathon finish line, people were lined up Saturday, awaiting the arrival of a quartet of unusual healers. The foursome is part of a corps with an amazing ability to calm and comfort people deeply shaken by violence or disaster just by being themselves -- dogs. People milled around the entrance to the First Lutheran Church of Boston, which sits close to the end of the race route, the site of last year's bombings. The church remained open throughout Marathon Monday 2013.
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MAGAZINE
May 18, 1986 | M\f7 . F. Rengel-Dempsey \f7 DVM
Q: Is it safe to put iodine on a dog's scratch, as my veterinarian told me it was? I've heard that iodine is not the antiseptic it was once thought to be and that it can worsen wounds and injure skin tissue.--H.L. A: There is absolutely nothing wrong with dabbing providone iodine (Betadine) on your dog's scratch. In a proper dilution and applied gently to wounds, it is a safe and effective antiseptic. We frequently have our clients flush out abscess pockets with iodine.
SPORTS
April 9, 2013 | By Mike Bresnahan and Eric Pincus
Metta World Peace beat the forecast for his return by 30 days. So Lakers fans recognized his toughness or eagerness or recklessness or whatever it was with an ovation when he checked into Tuesday's game against New Orleans. Twelve days had passed since his surgery to remove torn cartilage in his left knee. Taking to the Internet, World Peace did his own research to determine the fastest anyone had returned from a similar procedure. "I heard about the surgery . . . I went online," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1994 | JEANNETTE REGALADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 22-year-old Arleta man who died last April after receiving an injection from an unlicensed healer died of a severe throat infection and not the injection, officials said Wednesday. "He died of natural causes, that is the bottom line," said Scott Carrier, spokesman for the Los Angeles County coroner's office. "It wasn't from an injection." Carrier said traces of antibiotics were found in the blood of Jesus N. Anchondo Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2010 | By Steve Harvey, Los Angeles Times
The Palmdale Bulge ? it sounded like some sort of waistline problem afflicting middle-aged men. But it referred to something even more ominous in the mid-1970s ? the reported uplift of the Earth's crust by as much as 18 inches along the San Andreas fault in the Antelope Valley. Scientists wondered if it was the harbinger of a giant earthquake. Or perhaps a volcano. Southern Californians were uneasy in the aftermath of the 1971 Sylmar quake that killed 64. Stories of West Coast disaster were also trendy in the popular arts, whether it was author Curt Gentry's temblor tale "The Last Days of the Late, Great State of California"; the motion picture "Earthquake" (goodbye, Capitol Records tower)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
Theater history has been made at least twice with shows centering on fictitious female evangelists. George Bernard Shaw's "Major Barbara" has been drawing laughs and making wry points about the intersection between religion and money since 1905. "Guys and Dolls," with Frank Loesser songs helping spin a yarn first told by Damon Runyon about the improbable romance between a gambler and a missionary for the Salvation Army, helped put the "great" in "Great American Musical. " Could stage lightning strike again with the true-life, L.A.-centric story of Aimee Semple McPherson?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1990 | MARY CAMPBELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As far as John Lee Hooker is concerned, the blues wasn't born in the Mississippi Delta. He dates blues back further than that--to the Garden of Eden. "When the world was born, the blues was born," he says. "There wasn't no problem till God put man and woman together. Then started love and heartache. It turned into blues." The 73-year-old singer, guitarist and songwriter had a hit with his first record, "Boogie Chillen," in 1948.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1989
New York politicians and their supporters never cease to amaze me. Take David Dinkins, the Big Apple's Democratic nominee and supposed ethnic healer, for instance. According to The Times (Part I, Oct. 9), Dinkins, during a fund raiser in Baldwin Hills, was quoted as saying, "If one person says he will not vote for you because you are black or Jewish, that's bigotry." Then Times staffer Cathleen Decker went on to write, "But he insisted that voting for him because he is black was a proper display of racial pride."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
Votive candles flicker in red and yellow jars on a makeshift altar of wood and cinder blocks. A gnarled piece of incense burns in the hollowed head of a ceramic Aztec god--spewing curls of black smoke into the windowless room. In hushed tones, a fatherly healer recites prayers before the altar's crucifixes while the emotionally tortured woman at his side drinks three times from a goblet of rainwater. When the ritual is over, leaves from a California pepper tree litter the floor and the woman seems at peace.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
Theater history has been made at least twice with shows centering on fictitious female evangelists. George Bernard Shaw's "Major Barbara" has been drawing laughs and making wry points about the intersection between religion and money since 1905. "Guys and Dolls," with Frank Loesser songs helping spin a yarn first told by Damon Runyon about the improbable romance between a gambler and a missionary for the Salvation Army, helped put the "great" in "Great American Musical. " Could stage lightning strike again with the true-life, L.A.-centric story of Aimee Semple McPherson?
WORLD
March 29, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
KHURRIANWALA, Pakistan - Villagers in this small textile town thought Saeed Mehmood ul Hasan had a pipeline to God. They believed that his Koranic maxims - sometimes scrawled onto wadded scraps of paper, stuffed into a leather pouch and worn around the neck - could cure headaches, mend an ailing kidney or patch up a family rift. Allah Wasaya was among those who believed, and last year he hired Hasan to resolve a family spat over money. He and his family stopped believing, Wasaya said, when they determined that Hasan's remedy was a diversion for darker pursuits.
WORLD
May 12, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
He fell in love with his first wife because she was sincere and eager to please. His second wife, a cousin, was irresistible because she did everything he wished and nothing he didn't. "That alone made me love her. " His third wife won him because she submitted to his every request. "I saw her, I liked her. I went to her parents and asked for her hand in marriage. " Wife No. 4 was very obedient. So was wife No. 5. Wife No. 6, the same. As were wives 7 and 8 and 9 and … Well, by then — it was the late 1980s — things had taken off for Bello Maasaba, an Islamic faith healer in this city in Niger state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2010 | By Steve Harvey, Los Angeles Times
The Palmdale Bulge ? it sounded like some sort of waistline problem afflicting middle-aged men. But it referred to something even more ominous in the mid-1970s ? the reported uplift of the Earth's crust by as much as 18 inches along the San Andreas fault in the Antelope Valley. Scientists wondered if it was the harbinger of a giant earthquake. Or perhaps a volcano. Southern Californians were uneasy in the aftermath of the 1971 Sylmar quake that killed 64. Stories of West Coast disaster were also trendy in the popular arts, whether it was author Curt Gentry's temblor tale "The Last Days of the Late, Great State of California"; the motion picture "Earthquake" (goodbye, Capitol Records tower)
NATIONAL
September 5, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran, Los Angeles Times
Jason Pitre grew up hearing stories of how his great-grandfather healed babies on the cusp of death using herbs and plants found along Louisiana's bayous. The tribal healer, or traiteur , was known by the native Houma people for his potions and salves that seemed to treat any sickness. Now, the traditional herbs are in danger, Pitre said, threatened by decades of coastal erosion, hurricanes and development that have crept up on Golden Meadow in Bayou Lafourche, where many members of the United Houma Nation once lived.
SPORTS
August 31, 2010 | T.J. SIMERS
Day 1 of the Dodgers trial, and it's so sad, if that's the correct word, it's almost laughable. The judge begins by having Frank & Jamie McCourt stand before him and raise their right hands to swear them in, instructing each at the conclusion to please say, "I do. " Isn't that what brought us here? They said the same thing more than 30 years ago and how did that go? But here we are, the Screaming Meanie is not only friendly, she wants to introduce her parents. Frank McCourt is on a 90-minute lunch break outside the courtroom, and when I ask, "As owner of the Dodgers what's your feeling about Manny leaving town?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
Much of the discussion surrounding Mel Gibson's controversial film "The Passion of the Christ" centers on authenticity: Did Gibson stick to the gospel accounts as closely as he claims and, if so, are they historically accurate? With Gibson's film we have only to contrast what is on the screen with what is on the page to assess his declaration of biblical adherence.
SPORTS
August 31, 2010 | T.J. SIMERS
Day 1 of the Dodgers trial, and it's so sad, if that's the correct word, it's almost laughable. The judge begins by having Frank & Jamie McCourt stand before him and raise their right hands to swear them in, instructing each at the conclusion to please say, "I do. " Isn't that what brought us here? They said the same thing more than 30 years ago and how did that go? But here we are, the Screaming Meanie is not only friendly, she wants to introduce her parents. Frank McCourt is on a 90-minute lunch break outside the courtroom, and when I ask, "As owner of the Dodgers what's your feeling about Manny leaving town?"
SPORTS
June 26, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
Soccer players still come to see Kenneth Nephawe. Only not as many and not as often. "About two, three teams," he says. Not long ago, it might have been several times that number, a friend says sadly, but times and preferences change. Nephawe is a sangoma , a practitioner of herbal medicine, divination and counseling. Some would call him a juju man or traditional healer, the term he prefers. Once, juju men were as integral a part of African soccer as the ball and the goal.
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