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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2008 | David Kelly
County officials took the unusual step of forcing a tuberculosis patient into medical isolation when health officials suspected the patient was not taking medication and was going to work. County Public Health Director Jim Lindley and Public Health Officer Dr. Maxwell Ohikhuare said it was the first time in county history that such an action had been taken. The patient, whose name and gender were not revealed because of medical privacy rules, was treated for TB in Las Vegas on Aug. 7 before coming to Needles, authorities said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Irish pharmaceutical giant Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals said it will pay $5.6 billion in cash and stock for a fast-growing Anaheim bio-pharmaceutical firm that specializes in treating multiple sclerosis, the companies announced Monday. The deal for Questcor Pharmaceuticals Inc. would give Mallinckrodt drugs that primarily treat chronic autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Questcor's Acthar Gel, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, accounts for most of the company's sales.
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NATIONAL
August 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. magistrate ordered the federal government to provide a doctor for a Pakistani woman charged with trying to kill U.S. employees in an Afghanistan gunfight. A frail-looking Aafia Siddiqui sat in a wheelchair as Magistrate Henry Pitman ordered medical care within a day. Siddiqui's lawyers say her health is worsening from wounds suffered in the encounter last month. Her attorney said she may have lost a kidney and suffered brain damage.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Jenny Deam
DENVER - It was spring break, and Levy Thamba, a 19-year-old college student from Africa, had checked into a fourth-floor hotel room with three of his buddies. They had come from their small college in Wyoming looking for an adventure. No one is sure how much Thamba ate of the marijuana cookie purchased by one of his friends at a local pot shop. But soon the engineering student, who had never tried marijuana before, began acting strangely hostile, tearing around the room and pulling pictures from the wall.
HEALTH
March 16, 2009 | Elena Conis
Teas from across the globe are becoming more and more popular in the U.S. One relative newcomer, yerba mate, is attracting fans for its allegedly jitter-free caffeine boost and high antioxidant content. Lab research suggests some potential health benefits from drinking yerba mate, but studies of lifelong yerba mate drinkers in the tea's native South America suggest the brew increases the risk of some cancers -- a fact most marketing campaigns omit.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on "Good Morning America" that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks.
SCIENCE
September 5, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
President Kennedy's Addison's disease, which came to light only after his election in 1960, was most likely caused by a rare autoimmune disease, according to a Navy doctor who reviewed Kennedy's medical records. The disease, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2, or APS 2, also caused Kennedy's hypothyroidism, according to a report published Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Hard though it is to believe these days -- when a celebrity's smallest sneeze is analyzed -- Kennedy's family and advisors were able to keep his medical history virtually secret.
HEALTH
May 30, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's no secret that people drink alcohol before they turn 21. Stories about binge drinking on college campuses and alcohol-fueled high school parties are as easy to find as the Facebook photos that document them. But underage drinking isn't all fun and games. Kids who don't know their limits can drink to the point of alcohol poisoning, and those who feel invincible — as many at that age do — may underestimate the danger of getting behind the wheel. Some experts say the solution is to lower the legal drinking age to 18. More than 130 college chancellors and presidents have signed a petition initiated in 2008 in support of the idea.
HEALTH
July 4, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's hard to believe, but there was a time not long ago when everyone walked around (in public!) with naturally colored teeth. Today, with so many whitening gels, strips and trays out there, yellowish grins aren't as common — nor the natural look as appealing — as they used to be. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article incorrectly identified Dr. Vincent Mayher, a dentist, as being based in Philadelphia. Whitening mania is especially obvious in the toothpaste aisle.
HEALTH
December 26, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When your 3-year-old is throwing a tantrum in the middle of the supermarket or has poured his milk all over the floor, the urge to spank may be overwhelming. If you've ever given in to that urge, you're not alone - research shows that up to 90% of parents spank their children, at least occasionally. But does it work? And more importantly, is it harmful to kids? Once considered a fairly standard parenting practice, spanking is now opposed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Psychological Assn.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2014 | Alan Zarembo
In a windowless cinder-block room at Ft. Hood on Wednesday morning, 11 soldiers closed their eyes and practiced taking deep, slow breaths. The technique is useful for gaining self-control in stressful situations, explained their instructor. In the course of the day, the students would practice escaping a wrestling hold while being taunted by fellow soldiers. They would balance a dime on the end of an M16 rifle. They would watch a clip from the movie "Talladega Nights" in which Will Ferrell tries to get into a car with a cougar in the front seat.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Lisa Zamosky
Now that open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act is over for this year, healthcare consumers can begin to put their insurance policies to work. For many, it may be a challenge. A year ago, Norm Wilkinson, 61, retired after 35 years as a Teamster and signed on to a retiree health plan. He figured he'd enjoy the same comprehensive coverage he'd had for years, but soon learned that prescription drugs weren't covered. "I did not get a prescription drug plan with it, and that was the big killer," said Wilkinson, a resident of Whittier.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
ALBUQUERQUE - When Wynema and Michael Gonzagowski moved to town about two years ago, family and friends warned them about what they described as the heavy-handed tactics and aggressive attitude of Albuquerque police. At first the couple brushed off the warnings, saying things couldn't be as bad as what they had experienced in Los Angeles in the LAPD's Rampart Division, which became infamous for corruption in its anti-gang unit in the 1990s. But the Gonzagowskis, like others here, began to grow suspicious of their Police Department.
HEALTH
April 5, 2014 | Lily Dayton
Each time health psychologist Kelly McGonigal teaches her Science of Willpower class, she asks students to select a willpower challenge to focus on during the 10-week course. Though students' goals are diverse -- kicking nicotine or getting out of debt, controlling their temper or overcoming alcohol abuse -- there is one goal that is most common among the 200 or 300 students who pack the lecture hall seeking life change: They want to lose weight. "It's important to understand that everyone is struggling with something," says McGonigal, whose experience in the Stanford University course inspired her to write "The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It. " Beliefs about the role of willpower in weight loss have changed through the decades.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
Enrollment by Latinos in California's healthcare insurance exchange surged in the final month of sign-ups after an intensive push to reach that key population. "Our enrollment became more diverse in this last month, particularly among California's Latino population; our enrollment became younger," Covered California Executive Director Peter Lee said during a conference call with reporters Thursday after testifying with the heads of other state exchanges on Capitol Hill. With 1.2 million signed up for private plans, Lee said, "We're proud of that accomplishment.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
Even with 1.2 million people enrolled by Monday's deadline, California's health exchange isn't done adding to the Obamacare rolls - and it won't be for quite some time. In the months to come, it's estimated that several hundred thousand more Californians could qualify for a special enrollment period as college students graduate, families move and workers change jobs. But health insurers say the state's current rules for late sign-ups rely too much on the honor system and invite abuse by people waiting until they get sick.
HEALTH
February 6, 2012 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Fluoride is a natural mineral with an unnatural ability to stir controversy. On the Internet, the cavity fighter is often portrayed as a grave threat to health. Various sites call it "a deadly poison" and "an invisible killer" - the sort of thing you'd want to avoid if you had any choice. Most toothpastes contain fluoride, but people who prefer to brush without the additive have plenty of options. Tom's of Maine, a health and beauty company based in Kennebunk, sells several varieties of fluoride-free pastes.
HEALTH
April 17, 2011 | Cathryn Delude, Delude is a special correspondent
Time may heal all wounds, but the scars that remain can be unsightly, itchy, stiff and painful. Pharmacy aisles beckon with "clinically proven, doctor-recommended" scar products, and the Internet teems with anecdotes of different creams and elixirs that supposedly erase old scars or prevent new ones from forming. But not all of those claims stick. "There are a thousand wives' tales and a whole bunch of things you can buy, but none have scientific validity to speak of," says Dr. Terence Davidson, a professor of surgery at UC San Diego School of Medicine.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By David Lauter and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - The Affordable Care Act has passed its first big test, but the law's distribution of winners and losers all but guarantees the achievement will not quiet its political opposition. White House officials, who had a near-death experience with the law's rollout six months ago, were nearly giddy Tuesday as they celebrated an open-enrollment season that ended on a high note. Despite the early problems with the federal website, "7.1 million Americans have now signed up," President Obama declared in a Rose Garden speech to members of Congress, his staff and supporters in which he notably returned to referring to the law as "Obamacare.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Chad Terhune, Noam Levey and Soumya Karlamangla
Overrun by last-minute demand for Obamacare coverage, California gave many consumers until April 15 to enroll as thousands of people across the nation endured long lines and website troubles. Despite the problems, the late surge in sign-ups was a substantial boost to President Obama's signature law, particularly after such a disastrous launch in October. The final tally from the first year of the law's insurance expansion won't be known until later this spring. But as the Affordable Care Act's inaugural open-enrollment period wound down, an outpouring of interest pushed sign-ups on the new online marketplaces close to the Obama administration's goal of 7 million.
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