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HEALTH
February 2, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
As the backlash grew against the decision by Susan G. Komen for the Curefoundation to cease awarding grants to Planned Parenthood, Komen officials ended two days of silence on Thursday and tried to manage the uproar. In a conference call with the media, Komen founder and Chief Executive Nancy G. Brinker said the decision was due to policy changes intended to improve how grantees are selected. It had nothing to do with Planned Parenthood's position as an abortion provider, she said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013 | By Jill Cowan and Anna Gorman
When Hoag Hospital announced this spring it would no longer provide elective abortions, officials at the esteemed Orange County medical center said the decision was made because of low demand. But records and interviews show the decision was closely tied to the hospital's new partnership with a Catholic healthcare provider. Hoag Hospital officials told The Times this week they wanted the deal to go through and knew elective abortions were a “sensitive issue” for St. Joseph Health System, which has a “statement of common values” that prohibits them.
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HEALTH
November 2, 2009 | Brendan Borrell
Whether you are pumping gas or buying a fillet of salmon, your eyes have no doubt landed on an ominous sign documenting the presence of "chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm." Such alarming notices began appearing in the state in 1986 thanks to Proposition 65, otherwise known as the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, which prohibits businesses from discharging potentially harmful chemicals in drinking water and requires them to disclose the presence of such chemicals on their premises.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A perennial target for critics of sugary drinks, Coca-Cola Co. took to prime-time TV broadcasts to acknowledge its role in the fattening of Americans - and to defend itself. In a two-minute advertisement that was to debut Monday night on cable news channels, the world's top beverage company addressed what it called the "complex challenge of obesity. " In a spot it called "Coming Together" - a similar phrase Starbucks Corp. used in the fall to try to get fiscal cliff negotiations moving - Coca-Cola showcased its efforts to be transparent about the nutritional content of its products and to expand its line of drinks with low or no calories.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A perennial target for critics of sugary drinks, Coca-Cola Co. took to prime-time TV broadcasts to acknowledge its role in the fattening of Americans - and to defend itself. In a two-minute advertisement that was to debut Monday night on cable news channels, the world's top beverage company addressed what it called the "complex challenge of obesity. " In a spot it called "Coming Together" - a similar phrase Starbucks Corp. used in the fall to try to get fiscal cliff negotiations moving - Coca-Cola showcased its efforts to be transparent about the nutritional content of its products and to expand its line of drinks with low or no calories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1985
This is in response to your article (May 19), "Parents' Groups Decry Inequities in State Aid for the Mentally Ill and the Retarded." The Assn. for Retarded Citizens-California represents thousands of Californians with develop mental disabilities. In that article, referenced above, the system that serves them suffers by comparison. Ironically, that system is promoted as the model to which the mental health system should aspire. Such a comparison, while intended as an accolade for the developmental service system, actually commits a grave injustice against persons with developmental disabilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1999
Thank you for the important editorial April 4 regarding the need for the Orange County Transportation Authority to resolve eligibility issues for the mentally disabled. The editorial implies that OCTA has been reluctant to work with advocates for the mentally ill; on the contrary, the agency has been proactively addressing this concern. As noted in the editorial, eligibility has become more urgent now that OCTA's Board of Directors has approved a number of fare changes. The March discussion of fare changes led the board to direct the staff to satisfactorily resolve the issue before the implementation of fare changes in July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
Beverage industry forces flexed their political muscle once again Tuesday, dealing crushing defeats to two different sugary drink tax measures in the Golden State. In El Monte, nearly 77% of voters rejected a proposal to tax businesses 1 cent for every ounce of sugary beverages sold. A similar plan fell in the Bay Area city of Richmond, with about 67% of voters opposed. Both measures sparked intense campaigning from the beverage industry, which used a broad array of tactics to argue that the tax would hurt families and small businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013 | By Jill Cowan and Anna Gorman
When Hoag Hospital announced this spring it would no longer provide elective abortions, officials at the esteemed Orange County medical center said the decision was made because of low demand. But records and interviews show the decision was closely tied to the hospital's new partnership with a Catholic healthcare provider. Hoag Hospital officials told The Times this week they wanted the deal to go through and knew elective abortions were a “sensitive issue” for St. Joseph Health System, which has a “statement of common values” that prohibits them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
Mental health advocates, buoyed by the discovery of a windfall in state sales tax revenue, turned their political sights Friday on the $2.5-billion surplus as an unexpected savior for mental health programs in Los Angeles and other counties. Outlining a plan to tap the sudden largess, a trio of state legislators unveiled a proposal that would reserve $175 million of the newly found money for mental health programs that have already suffered drastic cuts. "The mental health system is the worst-funded system--period--in the state of California," Assemblyman Bruce Bronzan (D-Fresno)
OPINION
December 22, 2012
The reaction to the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., last week was immediate and voluminous. Of the more than 600 letters sent to letters@latimes.com on the topic, about 120 of them mentioned mental illness as a cause for the violence. A handful of writers warned against jumping to conclusions and stigmatizing those whostruggle with mental disabilities; one writer even turned questions about psychology into ones for gun advocates. Here is a selection of those letters. In a letter published Tuesday, Michelle Uzeta, legal director of the Disability Rights Legal Center in Los Angeles, wrote: "The tendency in our society is to label what happened, pack it in a box and tuck it away somewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
Beverage industry forces flexed their political muscle once again Tuesday, dealing crushing defeats to two different sugary drink tax measures in the Golden State. In El Monte, nearly 77% of voters rejected a proposal to tax businesses 1 cent for every ounce of sugary beverages sold. A similar plan fell in the Bay Area city of Richmond, with about 67% of voters opposed. Both measures sparked intense campaigning from the beverage industry, which used a broad array of tactics to argue that the tax would hurt families and small businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
For much of her life, Keris Myrick has tried to silence the voices that filled her head with suicidal thoughts and repeatedly sent her to a psychiatric hospital. But now, Myrick, 51, who has schizo-affective disorder, is embracing one voice that has grown loud and clear - her own. And as she becomes a symbol of recovery and strength in the face of mental illness, others are listening to what she has to say. Members of the nation's largest mental health advocacy organization, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, recently elected her their board president, giving the Pasadena resident a critical role in pushing for education, policy changes and better access to mental health care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2012 | By Scott Gold, Richard Winton and Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
"I sleep in trash cans. " It is a minute and 45 seconds into the security camera video. Kelly Thomas, 37, jaws with police officers at a Fullerton bus depot, his arms crossed over his bare chest, his backpack double-strapped. It is the night of July 5, 2011, about 8:30. It's still 80 degrees outside. A few pedestrians wander by. A car passes. There is no indication that the lives of every person on the tape are about to change. "You planning on going to sleep pretty soon?"
HEALTH
February 2, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
As the backlash grew against the decision by Susan G. Komen for the Curefoundation to cease awarding grants to Planned Parenthood, Komen officials ended two days of silence on Thursday and tried to manage the uproar. In a conference call with the media, Komen founder and Chief Executive Nancy G. Brinker said the decision was due to policy changes intended to improve how grantees are selected. It had nothing to do with Planned Parenthood's position as an abortion provider, she said.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Marketing unhealthful foods and beverages to children is off the charts, say some food and health advocacy groups, and they called on the Obama administration Thursday to support voluntary guidelines on how companies advertise to kids and how they formulate their products. To hammer their point home, a video titled "We're Not Buying It" was unveiled at a press conference Thursday that featured representatives from the Center for Science in the Public Interest , the Prevention Institute , Public Health Law & Policy , Yale University's Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity , the Center for Digital Democracy and the Berkeley Media Studies Group . The video, which the panelists hope will go viral, highlights the tremendous and sometimes insidious marketing efforts directed to children, often at a pace parents can't control.
NEWS
August 13, 2010
News that BP is unlikely to pay any claims related to mental-health problems caused by the oil spill has angered health groups around the country. On Friday, the American Psychiatric Assn. became the latest organization to demand that BP treat mental-health claims similarly to claims of physical illness or injury caused by the spill. BP claims administrator Kenneth Feinberg testified recently before the House Judiciary Committee that the company will probably not spend any of the $20 billion relief fund to settle mental-health claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2001 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cindy Soto says the state put the civil rights of a sick man before her daughter's safety. Soto told 330 advocates for the mentally ill on Thursday that if Steven Allen Abrams, a man with a history of psychological problems, had been forced into treatment, he might not have plowed his Cadillac into 30 children at a Costa Mesa playground. Two children died in the 1999 attack, including Soto's 4-year-old daughter, Sierra. "Do you think Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2011 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Authorities searching for suspected killer Aaron Bassler in the tangled woods around Fort Bragg have come tantalizingly close to capturing the fugitive, but his familiarity with the forest northwest of San Francisco has complicated the hunt, they say. The closest call came when Bassler popped up behind a bush near his mother's house, but he vanished after a search dog tackled him. Since then, the man accused of gunning down two area foresters has...
NATIONAL
July 6, 2011 | By Christine Mai-Duc, Washington Bureau
Breaking with a long-standing unwritten policy, President Obama announced Wednesday that he would send condolence letters to families of military service members who commit suicide or die of an accident in a combat zone. "This issue is emotional, painful and complicated, but these Americans served our nation bravely," Obama said of the suicide deaths in a statement. "They didn't die because they are weak. And the fact that they didn't get the help they needed must change. " The White House said the decision to alter the long-standing practice of honoring only combat deaths came after "a difficult and exhaustive review of the former policy.
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