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NEWS
January 9, 1990 | DAVID TREADWELL and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At a trial being closely watched by the nation's medical community and gay activists, the attorney for a doctor suffering from AIDS claimed in opening arguments Monday that the "young and brilliant physician" is suffering a "slow and tortuous death" because of the negligence of hospital officials and supervisors. Diane Wilner, an attorney representing Dr.
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NEWS
January 9, 1990 | DAVID TREADWELL and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At a trial being closely watched by the nation's medical community and gay activists, the attorney for a doctor suffering from AIDS claimed in opening arguments Monday that the "young and brilliant physician" is suffering a "slow and tortuous death" because of the negligence of hospital officials and supervisors. Diane Wilner, an attorney representing Dr.
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NEWS
November 21, 1993
Robert F. Wagner Jr., 49, son of former New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner Sr. and a deputy mayor in the Ed Koch Administration. Also the grandson of U.S. Sen. Robert Wagner, the third-generation Democrat served as New York's deputy mayor for policy from 1979 to 1983. He was former chairman of the city's Planning Commission, president of its Health and Hospitals Corp., president of the Board of Education and board member of the city's Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
NEWS
February 26, 1989
New York City has implemented a new policy to transfer psychiatric patients from city hospitals directly to homeless shelters to relieve overcrowding in psychiatric wards, officials said. "We are going to try it on a small scale," said First Deputy Mayor Stanley Brezenoff. "If it doesn't work, we won't continue it." Dr. Luis Marcos, vice president for mental hygiene at the city's Health and Hospitals Corp.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
A doctor who was suing the city, charging that she had contracted AIDS through the carelessness of another physician, accepted a settlement Thursday as attorneys were preparing to present their trial summations. The judge would say only that the amount was "between zero and $100 million." Dr. Veronica Prego said she was happy that the trial had ended. "It's been extremely difficult for me," she said, adding that the strain of the two-month trial had caused her condition to worsen.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1986
Citing improved operations at its acute-care hospitals and revenue from psychiatric facilities acquired last fall, Nu-Med reported 43% higher earnings on 37% higher sales for its first quarter ended July 31. The Encino-based hospital chain reported net income of nearly $1.7 million, or 15 cents a share, on sales of $90.8 million during the period. Nu-Med also said it was pleased with a Municipal Court jury's decision in August that former New York City official John J.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | United Press International
A former senior official, the first to go on trial in a city corruption scandal, was cleared Wednesday of bribery charges, but was convicted of stealing $4,200 from the heiress to the Maytag fortune. "Their substantive charges and the hysterical charges against me were totally rejected," said John McLaughlin, a lawyer and former president of the city's Health and Hospitals Corp., which oversees New York's sprawling health system.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1986 | ALAN GOLDSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Nu-Med, an Encino-based hospital chain, said it has reached a definitive agreement to sell five rural hospitals to First Health Inc., a privately held Batesville, Miss., company, for $12.2 million in cash and securities. The deal is subject to the approval of state health agencies. The hospitals, in Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, were acquired by Nu-Med a year ago from Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based U.S. Health Corp. as part of a larger deal.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2012 | By Cindy Carcamo
Six New York City hospitals were forced to evacuate hundreds of patients - including newborns cuddled in the arms of nurses - after losing power at the height of Hurricane Sandy, according to New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and news reports. “We've had significant challenges at many of our hospitals and healthcare facilities,” Bloomberg said Tuesday. “Fortunately, as of now, there have not been any storm-related fatalities in any of them.” New York University Medical Center and Coney Island Hospital continued evacuations Tuesday, New York state Sen. Jose Peralta said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
UCLA Medical Center is taking steps to fire at least 13 employees and has suspended at least six others for snooping in the confidential medical records of pop star Britney Spears during her recent hospitalization in its psychiatric unit, a person familiar with the matter said Friday. In addition, six physicians face discipline for peeking at her computerized records, the person said.
HEALTH
September 5, 2011 | By Lisa Zamosky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Thousands of first responders, workers, volunteers and local residents involved in the rescue and cleanup of the World Trade Center site, along with workers at the Staten Island landfill where wreckage was taken, are left a decade later with a range of physical and psychological ailments. Respiratory illnesses were among the earliest and most prominent health effects — including the most common one, known as the "World Trade Center cough. " Today, doctors understand World Trade Center cough to be more than just a cough.
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