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REAL ESTATE
April 14, 1991
"Flip Artists" by Carol Tice (Feb. 24) prompts me to add a few cautions on some important local and state regulations and tax considerations that may apply. If you do structural improvements that require building department approvals, you may run afoul of California's contractor licensing laws. The state requires that people who "make improvements to real property" be licensed as contractors; a contractor's license is necessary to obtain building permits except for homeowners acting as "owner-builders."
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BUSINESS
March 2, 2010 | By Duke Helfand
A consumer group sued Anthem Blue Cross on Monday, accusing California's largest for-profit health insurer of violating state law by closing certain policies to new members while illegally offering remaining customers alternative plans with fewer benefits at higher rates. Santa Monica-based Consumer Watchdog says in its lawsuit, which seeks class-action status, that Anthem closes "blocks of health insurance business" without offering comparable options. It did this last fall, just months before it informed policyholders who stayed put that their rates would rise as much as 39%, the suit says.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1997 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spurred by a controversy over unsanitary conditions at local restaurants, the Los Angeles City Council urged the county Tuesday to adopt more stringent measures to ensure that public health standards are met. The council's encouragement came even as the county's top health official promised Tuesday to implement a number of reforms to improve food safety procedures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2002 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four McDonald's restaurants at Los Angeles International Airport violated health and safety codes and employees there suffer dangerous working conditions and intimidation by managers, according to a report to be released today by a nonprofit worker advocacy group. McDonald's also failed to pay concession fees to the city agency that operates LAX, according to the study by the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles City Council panel on Wednesday moved to close a loophole that has hampered a new health crackdown on restaurants. In the process, council members threw in some recommendations of their own aimed at cleaning up renegade establishments. "Before someone is able to open a restaurant, they should pass a basic test on how to deal with food," said Councilman Mike Feuer, chairman of the council's Arts, Health and Humanities Committee.
REAL ESTATE
August 14, 1988 | EVELYN De WOLFE, Times Staff Writer
Tank Tech Corp. posed an interesting question. What's bigger than a bread box, poisons the environment and may cause financial ruin? The culprit, it says, is the unobtrusive, leaking underground storage tank--a potentially hazardous problem that warrants special attention from property owners, mortgage holders and insurance companies who sooner or later may have to deal with it. "Aging underground tanks can be found just about anywhere," said Bob Hayman, president of Tank Tech Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2002 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four McDonald's restaurants at Los Angeles International Airport violated health and safety codes and employees there suffer dangerous working conditions and intimidation by managers, according to a report to be released today by a nonprofit worker advocacy group. McDonald's also failed to pay concession fees to the city agency that operates LAX, according to the study by the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2010 | By Duke Helfand
A consumer group sued Anthem Blue Cross on Monday, accusing California's largest for-profit health insurer of violating state law by closing certain policies to new members while illegally offering remaining customers alternative plans with fewer benefits at higher rates. Santa Monica-based Consumer Watchdog says in its lawsuit, which seeks class-action status, that Anthem closes "blocks of health insurance business" without offering comparable options. It did this last fall, just months before it informed policyholders who stayed put that their rates would rise as much as 39%, the suit says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 966-5848
Work crews have begun cleaning up Haster Gardens Apartments, a 148-unit complex said to violate numerous health and safety codes. The city has sued several of the people listed as owners. And city inspectors have condemned 35 units until repairs are made. A judge appointed a receiver to collect rent and maintain the property. Improvements include landscaping and cleaning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI
An Encino man has been sentenced to 100 hours of community service and ordered to pay $14,966 in fines after pleading no contest to 10 violations of fire, health and safety codes at a Westlake residential hotel, prosecutors said. Rami K. Grinwald, 38, on Wednesday was also placed on three years summary probation by Los Angeles Municipal Judge T.K. Herman and has until Sept. 28 to complete repairs at the two-story, 37-room stucco hotel at 717 S. Columbia St., Deputy City Atty. Lawrence P.V.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles City Council panel on Wednesday moved to close a loophole that has hampered a new health crackdown on restaurants. In the process, council members threw in some recommendations of their own aimed at cleaning up renegade establishments. "Before someone is able to open a restaurant, they should pass a basic test on how to deal with food," said Councilman Mike Feuer, chairman of the council's Arts, Health and Humanities Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1997 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spurred by a controversy over unsanitary conditions at local restaurants, the Los Angeles City Council urged the county Tuesday to adopt more stringent measures to ensure that public health standards are met. The council's encouragement came even as the county's top health official promised Tuesday to implement a number of reforms to improve food safety procedures.
REAL ESTATE
April 14, 1991
"Flip Artists" by Carol Tice (Feb. 24) prompts me to add a few cautions on some important local and state regulations and tax considerations that may apply. If you do structural improvements that require building department approvals, you may run afoul of California's contractor licensing laws. The state requires that people who "make improvements to real property" be licensed as contractors; a contractor's license is necessary to obtain building permits except for homeowners acting as "owner-builders."
REAL ESTATE
August 14, 1988 | EVELYN De WOLFE, Times Staff Writer
Tank Tech Corp. posed an interesting question. What's bigger than a bread box, poisons the environment and may cause financial ruin? The culprit, it says, is the unobtrusive, leaking underground storage tank--a potentially hazardous problem that warrants special attention from property owners, mortgage holders and insurance companies who sooner or later may have to deal with it. "Aging underground tanks can be found just about anywhere," said Bob Hayman, president of Tank Tech Corp.
OPINION
October 11, 1998
Re the article about urban gardens, Sept. 29: Give me a break. The city is concerned about "illegal food sales, which violate health and safety codes, and makeshift shacks, which do not meet building and safety regulations." Read that as the politicians aren't extorting permit and building fees from the low-income residents. Any place but L.A., these people would be praised for their initiative and hard work. MARTIN VINCENT Fallbrook
NEWS
January 9, 1986
A onetime mortuary owner who was allegedly responsible for storing six corpses in a Carson storage facility was charged with a misdemeanor violation of state health and safety codes, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Three of the bodies were victims of the 1978 Jonestown mass suicide in Guyana. Authorities said Emmet A. Wardlow, owner of the now-defunct Chambers-Wardlow Mortuaries in Los Angeles and Compton, had stored the bodies in the Carson facility for a year.
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