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BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
CareAmerica to Acquire Heath Cal: CareAmerica Health Plans, a Chatsworth-based health maintenance organization, has agreed to acquire Heath Cal, a workers' compensation insurer, for $95 million. Heath Cal, based in San Francisco, has annual revenue of $140 million and provides workers' compensation coverage for more than 350 employers in California and other states.
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BUSINESS
April 15, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strongly worded rebuke, the California Public Employees' Retirement System on Tuesday called Kaiser Permanente's demand for a 12.6% rate hike "outrageous." At the same time, CalPERS, the nation's second-largest purchaser of health benefits after the federal government, said it approved an average 5% increase in medical premiums with nine other health maintenance organizations for 1999.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A consumer watchdog group Wednesday urged school officials to consider natural pesticides, rather than chemicals, when fighting termites or other insects and spraying campuses to control weeds. The nonprofit California Public Interest Research Group released a report showing that 87% of 54 school districts surveyed statewide use one or more of 27 chemical pesticides that are classified as potential carcinogens and harmful to human development of hormone, reproductive and nervous systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's elderly population could double over the next 20 years, bringing extra demands for new social and health services, according to a report released Wednesday. Cal State Fullerton's Center for Demographic Research, which studies social change for local governments, also found that the county's median age will jump from 32.2 in 1995 to 39.0 by 2015.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Time Airport Shuttle Inc. has been cited by Cal/OSHA for 14 violations of state worker safety laws, including exposing reservation and dispatch agents to engine exhaust fumes from shuttle vans at its Van Nuys warehouse-headquarters. Prime Time, which transports about 50,000 travelers per month, primarily between their homes and Los Angeles and Orange county airports, paid $1,190 in fines after being cited five weeks ago.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | MARY GUTHRIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For four hours a day, five days a week, Ken Smith toils at a workbench in a dusty basement, applying physics, handcrafts and a touch of psychology to the project at hand--making legs. Smith fashions artificial limbs out of plastic, metal and rubber as part of his program in orthotics and prosthetics at Cal State Dominguez Hills in Carson. It's the only undergraduate degree program of its kind in California and one of only three bachelor's level prosthetics programs in the nation.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strongly worded rebuke, the California Public Employees' Retirement System on Tuesday called Kaiser Permanente's demand for a 12.6% rate hike "outrageous." At the same time, CalPERS, the nation's second-largest purchaser of health benefits after the federal government, said it approved an average 5% increase in medical premiums with nine other health maintenance organizations for 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's Medi-Cal agency took the first step Tuesday toward revamping the county's troubled health-care program for medically uninsured people by approving a plan of action unlike any other in California. The board of directors of Cal-OPTIMA, which has brought 240,000 Medi-Cal recipients into managed care networks over the last 14 months, agreed to try bringing 30,000 indigent people--many of them seriously or chronically ill--under its enormous umbrella.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's elderly population could double over the next 20 years, bringing extra demands for new social and health services, according to a report released Wednesday. Cal State Fullerton's Center for Demographic Research, which studies social change for local governments, also found that the county's median age will jump from 32.2 in 1995 to 39.0 by 2015.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1996 | LISA RICHARDSON and JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Davida Gregory doesn't wonder if her kids are going to get sick, or whether they will need a doctor. With eight developmentally disabled children and young adults in her state-licensed group home, she knows one or the other will need medical attention at any given moment. Sometimes, it's an emergency, but more often it's routine: A 24-year-old with cerebral palsy needs physical therapy to help her walk and retain what remains of her independence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A consumer watchdog group Wednesday urged school officials to consider natural pesticides, rather than chemicals, when fighting termites or other insects and spraying campuses to control weeds. The nonprofit California Public Interest Research Group released a report showing that 87% of 54 school districts surveyed statewide use one or more of 27 chemical pesticides that are classified as potential carcinogens and harmful to human development of hormone, reproductive and nervous systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's Medi-Cal agency took the first step Tuesday toward revamping the county's troubled health-care program for medically uninsured people by approving a plan of action unlike any other in California. The board of directors of Cal-OPTIMA, which has brought 240,000 Medi-Cal recipients into managed care networks over the last 14 months, agreed to try bringing 30,000 indigent people--many of them seriously or chronically ill--under its enormous umbrella.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1996 | LISA RICHARDSON and JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Davida Gregory doesn't wonder if her kids are going to get sick, or whether they will need a doctor. With eight developmentally disabled children and young adults in her state-licensed group home, she knows one or the other will need medical attention at any given moment. Sometimes, it's an emergency, but more often it's routine: A 24-year-old with cerebral palsy needs physical therapy to help her walk and retain what remains of her independence.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | MARY GUTHRIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For four hours a day, five days a week, Ken Smith toils at a workbench in a dusty basement, applying physics, handcrafts and a touch of psychology to the project at hand--making legs. Smith fashions artificial limbs out of plastic, metal and rubber as part of his program in orthotics and prosthetics at Cal State Dominguez Hills in Carson. It's the only undergraduate degree program of its kind in California and one of only three bachelor's level prosthetics programs in the nation.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
CareAmerica to Acquire Heath Cal: CareAmerica Health Plans, a Chatsworth-based health maintenance organization, has agreed to acquire Heath Cal, a workers' compensation insurer, for $95 million. Heath Cal, based in San Francisco, has annual revenue of $140 million and provides workers' compensation coverage for more than 350 employers in California and other states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Time Airport Shuttle Inc. has been cited by Cal/OSHA for 14 violations of state worker safety laws, including exposing reservation and dispatch agents to engine exhaust fumes from shuttle vans at its Van Nuys warehouse-headquarters. Prime Time, which transports about 50,000 travelers per month, primarily between their homes and Los Angeles and Orange county airports, paid $1,190 in fines after being cited five weeks ago.
NEWS
June 10, 1987
The U.S. Department of Labor said it will assume enforcement of federal job safety and health regulations in California at the end of the month. Assistant Labor Secretary John Pendergrass said in Washington that Gov. George Deukmejian's proposal to slash the budget of the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA) for the coming fiscal year makes him doubt that "the state will be able to ensure adequate protection for workers after July 1."
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