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NEWS
May 14, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Three years after California became one of the first states to establish health and safety regulations for tanning salons, worried dermatologists say that the law has failed and that unsafe conditions persist throughout the industry. Although owners of tanning salons, and many of their patrons, disagree with that assessment, many salon operators support a second state law that would strictly regulate the fast-growing industry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison
State officials have ordered a Vernon battery recycler to begin testing dust and soil in the neighborhood around its plant to determine whether dangerous metals have accumulated and are posing a health risk to the community. In April, the state tried to close the Exide Technologies facility, after an analysis released by the South Coast Air Quality Management District showed that arsenic emissions from the plant were posing an increased cancer risk to as many as 110,000 people in Boyle Heights, Maywood, Huntington Park and other places.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
California Health Services Director Molly Coye on Wednesday defended the proposed elimination of anti-smoking TV ads just when evidence shows they are working. Coye maintained that local programs could prod even more Californians into giving up the habit, a spokeswoman said. If she's wrong, Coye reportedly is willing to admit it and change her strategy.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2011 | David Lazarus
Consumers receive their fair share of sucker punches from big corporations. But this one's a real beauty. And it affects all California seniors with Medicare Advantage plans offered by Anthem Blue Cross. Melvin Salse, 71, of North Hollywood received a letter from the insurance giant recently stating that "it has been our pleasure to provide you with Medicare Advantage coverage. " Salse, a retired TV producer, was assured that he's "a valued member" of the company and that "we look forward to providing you with outstanding service for years to come.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000 | SHAWN HUBLER
It was late afternoon in the midst of a heat wave, in that part of Greater Los Angeles that tends to get left out of the rap about golden dreams. Half past 5, and the mercury was still pulsing around 90. The smell of asphalt shimmered up from Imperial Highway. This, in short, should not have been "HOT DOUGHNUTS" time. But it was.
NEWS
September 21, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
These five Californians made key contributions to President Clinton's health reform plan. Alain Enthoven * Age: 63 * Occupation: Marriner S. Eccles professor of public and private management, Stanford Business School. Has held positions as an economist with the Rand Corp. and as an assistant secretary of defense. Helped England and the Netherlands reform their health care systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992
The Legislature has been collecting health-reform bills all spring, hoping to blend them this summer into a program that California can afford and Sacramento can agree on. The latest proposal into the hopper is a March entry by Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi that still seems to cover more of the essential needs in health care than any of its competitors.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Medical Assn. on Tuesday sued the federal government, formally challenging its refusal to provide free vaccinations to hundreds of thousands of children eligible for the new Healthy Families insurance program for low-income residents. The lawsuit protests a Catch-22 situation that has irked a long list of the state's health care providers, consumer advocates and politicians. And their outcry may spread to other states. The dispute stems from a determination by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE and APARNA SURENDRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Better safeguards are needed to protect the public from ecological and health risks of genetic experiments with crops, a consumer advocacy group said Thursday. California has 1,435 experimental crop sites, the California Public Interest Research Group said in a report that called for government agencies to exert more control over field test applications and conduct more research on potential damage to the environment and public health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1996 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of 33 Orange County hospitals evaluated regarding their treatment of heart attack victims, two--Placentia Linda Community Hospital and Friendly Hills Regional Medical Center--scored "significantly worse than expected" in a state study to be released today. Both Saddleback Memorial Medical Center and Columbia San Clemente Hospital and Medical Center, meanwhile, received the highest possible ratings.
OPINION
February 6, 2011 | By Phil Lebherz
Last month, the state lost an opportunity to receive tens of millions of dollars in federal funding to provide healthcare to uninsured kids. Why? It didn't enroll enough eligible children into its government health plans. In response to a federal incentive program that awarded extra money to states that met certain enrollment numbers, California set a goal of signing up 352,000 new kids in its Medi-Cal or Healthy Families programs. It fell short by about 24,000 kids, which left the state ineligible for the federal funds.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2002 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from hospitals, Blue Cross of California has backed off selling "tiered hospital" policies, which group hospitals by cost and increase co-payments for consumers who use the costlier facilities. Senior executives at Blue Cross, the state's largest health insurer, said the company changed course after encountering vigorous opposition from hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE and APARNA SURENDRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Better safeguards are needed to protect the public from ecological and health risks of genetic experiments with crops, a consumer advocacy group said Thursday. California has 1,435 experimental crop sites, the California Public Interest Research Group said in a report that called for government agencies to exert more control over field test applications and conduct more research on potential damage to the environment and public health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000 | SHAWN HUBLER
It was late afternoon in the midst of a heat wave, in that part of Greater Los Angeles that tends to get left out of the rap about golden dreams. Half past 5, and the mercury was still pulsing around 90. The smell of asphalt shimmered up from Imperial Highway. This, in short, should not have been "HOT DOUGHNUTS" time. But it was.
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The physician groups that form the backbone of managed care in California are in crisis, some hemorrhaging as much as $500,000 per month, and at least two dozen are expected to go out of business between now and the end of the year, according to figures to be released today by the California Medical Assn. Already, 15 such organizations, including one last week in Ventura County, have gone under this year, bringing the total since 1996 to 115.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Medical Assn. on Tuesday sued the federal government, formally challenging its refusal to provide free vaccinations to hundreds of thousands of children eligible for the new Healthy Families insurance program for low-income residents. The lawsuit protests a Catch-22 situation that has irked a long list of the state's health care providers, consumer advocates and politicians. And their outcry may spread to other states. The dispute stems from a determination by the U.S.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California and other AIDS-battered states appear headed for a dramatic shift in the way they track and report the disease--aiming to identify those in the earlier stages of HIV infection, as well as those who exhibit full-blown symptoms of AIDS. In coming months, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will release HIV reporting recommendations to states, and ultimately could tie compliance to coveted federal funding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1990
The health care message from Sacramento yet again was "better luck next year." There's hope that a new energized governor will work with legislators in a way Gov. George Deukmejian could or would not. That's a reasonable hope, but it will take more than new blood in the state house to solve what is a national health-care crisis of mammoth proportions.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California and other AIDS-battered states appear headed for a dramatic shift in the way they track and report the disease--aiming to identify those in the earlier stages of HIV infection, as well as those who exhibit full-blown symptoms of AIDS. In coming months, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will release HIV reporting recommendations to states, and ultimately could tie compliance to coveted federal funding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1998 | GLENN MELNICK, Glenn Melnick is a professor of health care finance at the USC School of Public Administration and resident consultant at Rand Corp. E-mail: king@rand.org
Imagine that one state had hit on the key to controlling one of the nation's most pressing social problems, and then started contemplating proposals that would undermine that success. Meanwhile, the rest of the country stood by expectantly, waiting to jump on the state's lead. This, in a nutshell, is California's story as the Legislature considers more than 100 recommendations from Gov.
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