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Health Campaign

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Gay, lesbian and bisexual adults in Los Angeles smoke at a rate more than 50% higher than their straight counterparts and suffer disproportionately from the ill effects of tobacco use, health officials reported Thursday at the introduction of a new countywide campaign to stamp out the habit. The Break Up With Tobacco campaign is intended to sharply reduce smoking in the gay, lesbian and bisexual community, currently an estimated 20.6% in Los Angeles County, public health chief Dr. Jonathan Fielding said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Gay, lesbian and bisexual adults in Los Angeles smoke at a rate more than 50% higher than their straight counterparts and suffer disproportionately from the ill effects of tobacco use, health officials reported Thursday at the introduction of a new countywide campaign to stamp out the habit. The Break Up With Tobacco campaign is intended to sharply reduce smoking in the gay, lesbian and bisexual community, currently an estimated 20.6% in Los Angeles County, public health chief Dr. Jonathan Fielding said.
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SCIENCE
November 6, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
As President Obama and Mitt Romney make a last-minute push for votes, First Lady Michelle Obama can already chalk up a small victory for her campaign to fight childhood obesity. In a semi-scientific study conducted on the front porch of a Yale University economist on Halloween night, children who viewed a picture of the first lady and were then offered a choice of fruit or candy were much more likely to select the healthful snack than their counterparts who were shown a photo of Ann Romney.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
Mariel Hemingway mines her famous family's history in "Running From Crazy," exploring the legacy left by her iconic grandfather Ernest - one of creative heights and emotional lows. By Mariel's count, she's lost seven relatives to suicide, and having experienced depression and suicidal thoughts herself, she's embarked on a holistic health campaign to rescue herself and her daughters from the same fate. At once short on details and incredibly forthcoming, Barbara Kopple's documentary doesn't dig into specifics about Mariel's personal struggles with mental illness nor the WillingWay lifestyle that she and her boyfriend Bobby Williams espouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
Mariel Hemingway mines her famous family's history in "Running From Crazy," exploring the legacy left by her iconic grandfather Ernest - one of creative heights and emotional lows. By Mariel's count, she's lost seven relatives to suicide, and having experienced depression and suicidal thoughts herself, she's embarked on a holistic health campaign to rescue herself and her daughters from the same fate. At once short on details and incredibly forthcoming, Barbara Kopple's documentary doesn't dig into specifics about Mariel's personal struggles with mental illness nor the WillingWay lifestyle that she and her boyfriend Bobby Williams espouse.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
In choosing a passel of new graphic warning labels that the U.S. government would have cover half of every cigarette package sold, officials of the Food & Drug Administration wrestled with one of the central questions of any public health campaign worth its salt: Would the warnings get a rise out of smokers? If the reaction of five of the nation's largest manufacturers of tobacco products is any indication, they will. On Tuesday, five of the nation's six largest tobacco manufacturers sued the U.S. government to block the new requirement that graphic warnings cover half of every pack sold by October 2012, calling the ruling a violation of their free-speech rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1992
Lest anyone think that all the news coming out of California these days is gloomy, here's some good news: Californians may be stressed about job security and the cost of living but they aren't too stressed to take better care of their health. It's no joke: The changes that Californians are making are the lifesaving sort. An ambitious public health campaign by the state government has reduced the ranks of smokers 17% in the last 3 years, according to a new state-funded study.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Here we are, at the height of beach season, and depending on the sand we choose, there could be a ban on smoking. Two researchers say the scientific evidence behind smoking bans in 843 parks and 150 beaches across the U.S. is not strong - and that might weaken trust in public health authorities. Prohibition on smoking in parks and on beaches has three justifications, according to two Columbia University researchers, Ronald Bayer and Kathleen Bachynski. Those are: risk of secondhand smoke, pollution caused by cigarette butts and the risky role models smokers are to children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Concerned about the dangers of consistently climbing obesity rates, Los Angeles County officials launched a new public health campaign Thursday to help residents control their portion sizes. The campaign - Choose Less, Weigh Less - aims to raise awareness about recommended calorie limits and to get residents to consume fewer calories. "It is no secret that portion size, as well as our waistlines, have expanded over the last two decades," Jonathan Fielding, director of the county Department of Public Health, said during a news conference in downtown Los Angeles.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Should your cat's "No. 2" be considered a No. 1 health problem? Thanks to a hardy parasite that makes its home in cat feces, a growing number of animal disease experts are calling for a national health campaign to clean up after America's beloved felines. "Nobody wants to talk about it, but our cats are outside pooping all over the place," said Patricia Conrad, a professor of parasitology at UC Davis' School of Veterinary Medicine. "There's a lot more out there in the environment than any of us would like to think about.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
Public health officials know that Angelenos like to go out to restaurants a lot. They also know that means eating a lot - sometimes too much. So they came up with an idea: Convince restaurants to make changes so customers can dine out and make wise choices at the same time. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health launched a partnership Thursday with restaurants throughout the region to promote healthier options for customers. To be part of the Choose Health LA Restaurants program, places must offer smaller portion sizes and healthier children's meals with less fried food and more fruits and vegetables.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Here we are, at the height of beach season, and depending on the sand we choose, there could be a ban on smoking. Two researchers say the scientific evidence behind smoking bans in 843 parks and 150 beaches across the U.S. is not strong - and that might weaken trust in public health authorities. Prohibition on smoking in parks and on beaches has three justifications, according to two Columbia University researchers, Ronald Bayer and Kathleen Bachynski. Those are: risk of secondhand smoke, pollution caused by cigarette butts and the risky role models smokers are to children.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Should your cat's "No. 2" be considered a No. 1 health problem? Thanks to a hardy parasite that makes its home in cat feces, a growing number of animal disease experts are calling for a national health campaign to clean up after America's beloved felines. "Nobody wants to talk about it, but our cats are outside pooping all over the place," said Patricia Conrad, a professor of parasitology at UC Davis' School of Veterinary Medicine. "There's a lot more out there in the environment than any of us would like to think about.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
As President Obama and Mitt Romney make a last-minute push for votes, First Lady Michelle Obama can already chalk up a small victory for her campaign to fight childhood obesity. In a semi-scientific study conducted on the front porch of a Yale University economist on Halloween night, children who viewed a picture of the first lady and were then offered a choice of fruit or candy were much more likely to select the healthful snack than their counterparts who were shown a photo of Ann Romney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Concerned about the dangers of consistently climbing obesity rates, Los Angeles County officials launched a new public health campaign Thursday to help residents control their portion sizes. The campaign - Choose Less, Weigh Less - aims to raise awareness about recommended calorie limits and to get residents to consume fewer calories. "It is no secret that portion size, as well as our waistlines, have expanded over the last two decades," Jonathan Fielding, director of the county Department of Public Health, said during a news conference in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
In choosing a passel of new graphic warning labels that the U.S. government would have cover half of every cigarette package sold, officials of the Food & Drug Administration wrestled with one of the central questions of any public health campaign worth its salt: Would the warnings get a rise out of smokers? If the reaction of five of the nation's largest manufacturers of tobacco products is any indication, they will. On Tuesday, five of the nation's six largest tobacco manufacturers sued the U.S. government to block the new requirement that graphic warnings cover half of every pack sold by October 2012, calling the ruling a violation of their free-speech rights.
NEWS
February 15, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
So-called female condoms were handed out Monday on the streets of San Francisco just in time for Valentine's Day. This doesn't exactly scream romance to us. But the city's public health officials were less interested in love and more interested in urging women and gay men to use this "other" kind of condom to fight sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV/AIDS. Female condoms aren't exactly a household object -- so some people may be unsure how to use them. Planned Parenthood is there for you. Here's how they work: "The female condom is a plastic pouch that is used during intercourse to prevent pregnancy and reduce the risk of sexually transmitted diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1991 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Private investigator Nick Blake unlocked his office door and lunged for the phone. Cardiologist Joe Goodheart was on the line, and he sounded grim. A 43-year-old patient was having chest pains, and, Goodheart said darkly, "I don't think we're talking natural causes--if you know what I mean."
NEWS
February 15, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
So-called female condoms were handed out Monday on the streets of San Francisco just in time for Valentine's Day. This doesn't exactly scream romance to us. But the city's public health officials were less interested in love and more interested in urging women and gay men to use this "other" kind of condom to fight sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV/AIDS. Female condoms aren't exactly a household object -- so some people may be unsure how to use them. Planned Parenthood is there for you. Here's how they work: "The female condom is a plastic pouch that is used during intercourse to prevent pregnancy and reduce the risk of sexually transmitted diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2002 | MILTON CARRERO GALARZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aiming to spread the message of "loving responsibly," county officials are launching a $1-million HIV prevention campaign that shies away from explicit images but is intended to reach at-risk minorities. The campaign consists of text-only bilingual billboards that include AIDS awareness messages such as "Respecting Yourself and Valuing Your Partner," and "Caring for Our Gay Sons and Brothers." The billboards also display a telephone number for counseling and HIV testing sites.
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