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BUSINESS
March 3, 1996
The Foster Higgins survey has documented the decrease in costs to businesses of their health-care plans resulting from an increase in enrollment of employees into health maintenance organizations ("A Balm for Business," Jan. 30). This has led some observers to the conclusion that traditional fee-for-service providers will be phased out within the next five years. This conclusion ignores the facts that preferred provider organizations cost the employer less than HMO plans and that PPOs deliver fee-for-service care using traditional providers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paige St. John
FRENCH CAMP, Calif. - California's $840-million medical prison - the largest in the nation - was built to provide care to more than 1,800 inmates. When fully operational, it was supposed to help the state's prison system emerge from a decade of federal oversight brought on by the persistent neglect and poor medical treatment of inmates. But since opening in July, the state-of-the-art California Health Care Facility has been beset by waste, mismanagement and miscommunication between the prison and medical staffs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1996
It's not often I read something written with the magnitude of misinformation as was set forth in a Feb. 4 letter from Irwin I. Rosenfeld, M.D., College of Medicine, UC Irvine. It appears Dr. Rosenfeld can't decide who he's more angry with: managed-care companies, insurance companies, CEOs, lawyers, plumbers or his inability to earn more money. As an HMO executive, I'd like to respond and attempt to set the record straight. First, I'm curious to know the names of those health insurance companies that currently pay only 35% of their collected premiums for their members' health care while pocketing 65% for administration and profits.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - With a March 31 deadline to sign up for insurance under President Obama's health law approaching, more than a million people a day are visiting HealthCare.gov, administration officials said Wednesday. The site - the main portal for insurance marketplaces in 36 states - got 1.2 million visitors Tuesday and 1.1 million visitors Monday, according to the administration. At the same time, call centers received more than 500,000 calls over those two days. Despite the crush, the website, which crashed repeatedly last year, has been stable, said Kurt DelBene, a former Microsoft executive who has been overseeing the website operations as a senior advisor to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2000
Re "Despite Big Spending, U.S. Ranks 37th in Study of Global Health Care," June 21: What is the big mystery about the World Health Organization report that the U.S. spends more money than any other nation in the world on health care but in terms of the quality of the health system ranks way down in 37th place, a bare two notches above Cuba? Has everyone forgotten that hundreds of millions of dollars of health-care spending are skimmed off the top every year to pay the exorbitant multimillion-dollar salaries of CEOs of for-profit HMOs?
BUSINESS
November 30, 2003
Re: "WellPoint CEO Envisions Custom Health Coverage" (Oct. 29): In reflecting on the accomplishments of Leonard Schaeffer, the chairman and chief executive of WellPoint Health Networks Inc., which is being acquired by Anthem Inc., columnist James Flanigan failed to emphasize the tragic demise of health care as we know it today. Before WellPoint and Anthem came onto the scene, the Blue Cross/Blue Shield world was nonprofit and more affordable by both individuals and groups. With the for-profit schema ruling the health world now, affordable health care is rapidly disappearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1993 | RICHARD D. LAMM, Former Colorado Gov. Richard D. Lamm is director of the Center for Public Policy and Contemporary Issues at the University of Denver.
Marshall McLuhan once observed that "nothing fails like success." It is worth keeping in mind as we reform our health-care system. The more successful we are in treating acute disease, the more we must spend treating chronic disease. Most of our "miracles" of medicine set us up for more expensive health care down the line. Most studies show that the lifetime health-care costs of smokers are substantially under those of nonsmokers.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS
Facing an acute shortage of nurses, hospitals and nursing homes will be under pressure to increase nurses' salaries and to provide enough support staff to relieve nurses of non-nursing duties as recommended in a recent federal study. At the same time, analysts do not expect third-party payers, including federal Medicare and Medicaid and private insurers, to ease up on their efforts to cut medical expenses. The cost containment movement is expected to continue to restrict health-care industry revenue and keep the rate of profit growth in single digits.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1990 | LINDA WILLIAMS
Health-care cost containment was the major issue in the industry in the 1980s and promises to be the dominant theme of the 1990s. The reason is simple. Despite a decade or more of efforts to keep costs down by the people who pay most health-care bills--the government and private employers--health-care costs continue to rise at rates above the general rate of inflation. The surprise of the last year or so was the emergence of support for some form of national health-care insurance among a small group of business leaders who in the past have been extremely hostile to the idea.
OPINION
November 16, 2002
Re "A Loud 'Yes' on Health Care," editorial, Nov. 11: The Times asks rhetorically, "Do ordinary people want action on the health-care problems that politicians love to ignore?" You bet we do. But not by taxing citizens. Rather, the action we want is stopping the ever-rising "swelling immigrant population" mentioned later in the editorial that is causing the state's health-care meltdown. Too bad California's massive congressional delegation loves to ignore the problems caused by mass immigration.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey, David Lauter and Maeve Reston
WASHINGTON - As Hillary Rodham Clinton sought to reshape the nation's healthcare system in her husband's first term as president, she got all the right advice from senior aides: Consult closely with members of Congress, build bridges with business leaders, communicate clearly to nervous voters, move swiftly. The first lady and her husband ultimately failed in nearly all those efforts, nearly sinking Bill Clinton's presidency. Thousands of documents released Friday, which detail that failure as well as other policy disputes of the Clinton White House, provide new details on what remains one of the defining chapters in Hillary Clinton's career.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
It's long struck me as odd that drugstores, the places where most of us get our prescriptions filled for all manner of illnesses, also are go-to spots for cigarettes. With the latter, drugstores worsen the nation's health; with the former, they profit from it. ... Wait, maybe there is a method to that madness. Regardless, the CVS chain, owned by CVS Caremark , is doing the nation a service by ending the sale of tobacco products at its more than 7,600 retail outlets.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2013 | By Chad Terhune, David Lauter and Maeve Reston
After months of technical glitches and political tumult, a burst of last-minute insurance shoppers illustrated the growing appetite for Obamacare and the enormous challenges ahead in making the massive healthcare expansion work. On Monday, the crush of consumers prompted the Obama administration to put thousands of applicants on hold and push back another key enrollment deadline to Tuesday. This unexpected move came despite weeks of computer fixes aimed at improving the troubled HealthCare.gov website.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Jon Healey
The Obama administration on Tuesday put a former top Microsoft executive in charge of HealthCare.gov, the troubled website serving 36 states' insurance-buying marketplaces. Insert your joke about Obamacare's blue screen of death here. Seriously, one has to hope the new guy -- Kurt DelBene, former head of the Microsoft Office Division -- brings only a portion of Microsoft's heritage along with him. Aside from the XBox, the software giant isn't known for great consumer experiences.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - In the clearest sign yet that the federal health insurance website is vastly improved, about 29,000 people enrolled in insurance plans over the first two days of this week, exceeding the number of enrollments on the site in all of October, according to a source familiar with the data. The 29,000 figure tallies the number of people able to select health plans Sunday and Monday, the 48-hour window after the administration's deadline for making major repairs to the HealthCare.gov website.
OPINION
December 3, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
Success! The Obama administration announced over the weekend that it had hit its deadline of Nov. 30 for HealthCare.gov. Of course, there were caveats. The site will still probably get buggy when there's a lot of traffic, which is why Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius advised people to use it at off-peak hours. But that simply means peak hours will be moved to after midnight. After all, you don't alleviate crowding if you tell everyone to try a different door.
OPINION
December 13, 2003
The Times is to be congratulated for the remarkable "Stealth Merger: Drug Companies and Government Medical Research" and for its strong editorial stand on fees paid by drug companies to National Institutes of Health scientists (Dec. 7). David Willman, who skillfully reported the Rezulin drug scandal, has once again highlighted an issue of deepest significance: the subversion of objective science by conflicts of interest so deep they cannot be tolerated. His article raises the issue of the role of the marketplace in health care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1988
I submit that the reason that health care costs appear to be out of sight is that the delivery of health care has been subject to regulation based on well-intentioned, but blind, thinking. For example, the shift in treatment patterns from reliance on expensive in-hospital procedures to reliance on much less costly, but nonetheless effective, outpatient modalities is well-documented. One would, then, expect to see exactly the overall drop in expenditures on in-patient hospital care and the rise in the use of outpatient services that your editorial condemns.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Two turbulent months into the launch of the Affordable Care Act's insurance marketplace, President Obama moved to defend the law against Republican attacks Tuesday as the administration tried to deflect attention from the federal website's botched rollout. The White House's renewed effort to tout the law has two aims: to encourage Americans to sign up for coverage and to reassure nervous Democratic lawmakers and other allies who have watched Obama's so-far unsuccessful efforts to contain the political damage.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Noam N. Levey, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration's overhauled healthcare website got off to a bumpy relaunch Monday as a rush of consumers caused an uptick in errors and forced the administration to put thousands of shoppers on the HealthCare.gov site on hold. “Demand today has been high,” said Julie Bataille, a spokeswoman for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which is operating the troubled portal for the president's healthcare law. “We do know that things are not perfect with the site.” Bataille said about 375,000 visitors went to the site before noon, about double the normal traffic for a Monday morning.
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