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Health Care Crisis

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OPINION
December 29, 1991
The American public is growing more concerned about the crisis in health care. Our government should know that the majority of Americans do not favor mandatory medical coverage. As savvy taxpayers we recognize that any such plan will have two effects: a watered-down ineffective health care service and tremendous taxes to pay for it. The result will be that the overburdened taxpayer will be forced into paying more and more for less and less. A solution to the crisis is to have the medical professions bring their fees in line with reality.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 1, 2003 | Brian D. Johnston, Brian D. Johnston is an emergency physician and a board member of the Los Angeles County and California Medical associations.
Everyone take a bow. With great fanfare, the politicians announced they had found lots of new money to fix Los Angeles County's health-care crisis: $170 million from Measure B, $150 million from Washington, $100 million from Sacramento. And so public health has dropped off the public radar screen. But the basic problem hasn't been solved or even addressed. We have too many uninsured people and too small a public system of clinics, hospitals and public health.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989
Mrs. M.B. Collins' response (May 14) to The Times' article on the plight of the UCI Medical Cener, reserving "sympathy for those who are here legally and are paying their way," is interesting; naive and hateful might be more accurate and descriptive. Unless Mrs. Collins' forefathers were American Indian, I must assume that at some time in history they immigrated to the United States. Was it to escape the poverty of the Irish potato famine? The pogroms of Easter Europe? Maybe, the Turkish-Armenian holocaust; or, if as 17th-Century Pilgrim settlers, to escape religious persecution in England.
OPINION
October 26, 2002
Re "Vote Yes for Trauma Care," editorial, Oct. 18: L.A. County Measure B is a Band-Aid remedy to cure a serious cancer in the health-care crisis. Homeowners, however, should view Measure B as a sneaky attempt to circumvent the protections of Prop. 13. Right now, for many, the amount seems small, just 3 cents per square foot. But voters will forever surrender to the politicians the control and power to increase this tax annually, tied to the rate of medical inflation. There are no caps on the amount this tax can be increased, and no further voter approval will be required.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | From Associated Press
Hillary Rodham Clinton on Friday criticized politicians who say there is no health care crisis in America, calling them Washington insiders who have no health care worries themselves. Mrs. Clinton said she met living proof of a crisis earlier in the day: Pamala Hinkley, a 34-year-old pregnant woman who said she is considering going without an anesthetic when she gives birth because it would cost $1,200. The mother of four told Mrs.
NEWS
December 24, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since a car accident two years ago, Wang Zhiyou has had surgery 19 times. The scars on his legs, arms and forehead prove it. He has endured a steel rod being inserted into his leg and even survived a botched operation that set back his recovery for months. But the 50-year-old boat factory employee considers himself doubly lucky--not merely because he lived to tell the tale but because his employer pays his medical bills. "My company is pretty good. They pay all my expenses," he said.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
This crisis too shall pass. The great health financing problem of Los Angeles County will be solved by a combination of private contractors, federal subsidies, a new flexibility in health care delivery and, finally, by a new kind of tax on providers of medical care. Hospitals, physicians, medical plans will all be taxed to pay for health care for the totally indigent--those without any kind of medical insurance or eligibility for Medi-Cal benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990
In response to Ernest Conine's column "Canada's Sensible Approach" (Op-Ed Page, March 26) and Los Angeles County Supervisor Ed Edelman's letter advocating the enactment of a health-care program modeled after Canada's: The solution to our health-care crisis is less, not more government. Through private health insurance, a sweeping program of incentives and tax credits to health insurance companies and employers who provide coverage to workers would make health insurance available and affordable.
OPINION
August 21, 2002
"Deaf to Health Fund Crisis" (editorial, Aug. 18), about California medical care, is appropriate. However, this is like shooting BB guns when The Times should be using guided missiles. I believe it to be the moral duty of all who have a public forum to harangue our lawmakers. A never-ending barrage should be used to make them realize there must be a national health program. Robert S. Ellison MD Arcadia Thank you for keeping before our eyes the approaching tsunami of closures and cutbacks in health-care services threatening all of us in L.A. County.
NEWS
February 13, 2002 | VICKI KEMPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business and labor leaders, the insurance industry, health-care providers and consumer advocates--at odds on almost every issue--sat on the same side of a table Tuesday to declare that the country is in a health-care crisis and proclaim their commitment to health coverage for all Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2001 | RAYMOND SCHULTZE, Raymond Schultze, M.D., is the president of the Venice Family Clinic
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has yet to figure out how to deal with the 2.7 million county residents who do not have health insurance--the largest uninsured county population in the United States--and time is running out. In 1995, President Clinton came to the rescue of the county's ailing health system, which is the last resort for non-elderly citizens without insurance, when L.A. County faced a shortfall of several hundred million dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2001 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By 10 a.m., both waiting rooms at the South Central Family Health Center are filled with people waiting for one of four doctors to treat severe abdominal pains, fevers, diabetic episodes. Few of the factory workers, nannies or deliverymen who sit elbow to elbow in the low-cost clinic are insured. Neither are the housewives whose husbands hold other low-wage jobs that do not offer benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUSAN FRANKS, Susan Franks of Camarillo is an emergency department nurse at St. John's Regional Medical Center in Oxnard and a member of the union bargaining team
The business of health care, in which the bottom line takes precedence over patient care, has created a crisis in the staffing of nurses at hospitals. It is a global problem but one the nurses at St. John's hospitals in Ventura County have organized to combat. Charles Padilla, chief operating officer and administrator of St. John's Regional Medical Center in Oxnard and St.
NEWS
November 25, 2000 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
As the nation debates patients' rights and prescription drug benefits, Los Angeles County is struggling on a more basic level to keep its health care system from melting down. The county's 13-hospital trauma network was just pulled back from the brink of collapse. Its Department of Health Services, solvent only because of two massive federal bailouts since 1995, is looking at a $506-million deficit in five years.
NEWS
February 28, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN and MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Vice President Al Gore elevated a family's potentially life-and-death dispute with a giant insurance company to an extraordinary level Sunday, as he sternly warned the firm publicly against cutting the family's medical benefits. As Gore angrily described the family's plight, a crowd of about 400 supporters at his campaign rally alternately roared with support for the family and vented its anger at Aetna Inc. by booing and jeering lustily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1999 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, Ventura County government's newest chief administrator is the Dudley Do-Right of local government. David L. Baker's life motto, says his parish priest, is "Do good and avoid evil." He regularly put in 14-hour days as the top bureaucrat in San Joaquin County. He had kind words and high expectations of the county's 6,500 employees. He also kept close watch over its $700-million budget.
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