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Health Care Financing Administration

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The latest version of the federal government's Medicare hospital mortality information demonstrates that the U.S Health Care Financing Administration has markedly improved the statistical techniques used in preparing the massive study. For example, it has taken into account the percentage of emergency cases and nursing home transfers among a hospital's cases.
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NEWS
May 12, 2001 | From Associated Press
Over the past decade, the government paid $4.1 million to cover future medical costs for patients who were dead, government inspectors reported Friday. The Health Care Financing Administration paid health maintenance organizations on patients' behalf although Medicare listed the beneficiaries as dead, the Department of Health and Human Services inspector general said. The Medicare agency paid premiums for 200 people who had died between 1991 and 1999, the report said.
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NEWS
May 12, 2001 | From Associated Press
Over the past decade, the government paid $4.1 million to cover future medical costs for patients who were dead, government inspectors reported Friday. The Health Care Financing Administration paid health maintenance organizations on patients' behalf although Medicare listed the beneficiaries as dead, the Department of Health and Human Services inspector general said. The Medicare agency paid premiums for 200 people who had died between 1991 and 1999, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal health care officials agreed Wednesday to "take a fresh look" at Medicare billing guidelines that have compounded Ventura County's fiscal troubles by withholding $3 million in reimbursements for county clinics and could siphon away an additional $1.6 million annually. At a meeting in Washington, Chief Administrative Officer Harry Hufford and other county officials urged Thomas A. Gustafson, director of the purchasing policy group of the U.S.
NEWS
March 14, 1986
President Reagan will name Dr. William L. Roper, now his special assistant for health policy, to become head of the $93-billion agency that runs the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs, a White House official said. An industry source said an announcement is expected today. Roper, a 36-year-old physician, will take over the Health Care Financing Administration, a branch of the Health and Human Services Department.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | From Times wire services
More physicians are agreeing to limit their charges for Medicare patients, although it is harder to find such a doctor in some states than in others, the government said today. The Health Care Financing Administration reported that 283,475 physicians--40.7% of the 696,848 doctors who bill Medicare--have signed agreements for this year to charge Medicare patients no more than the government-approved amount. That's an increase from 37.3% in 1988 and 30.6% in 1987, and accounts for more than 60% of the total Medicare spending on physicians' services, said Louis B. Hays, acting administrator of HFCA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1985
Here we go again with another piece of utter stupidity, callousness and insanity displayed by Reagan Administration leaders. I am referring this time to the news item (Times, June 21) relating to a planned $350,000 celebration of the 20th birthday of Medicare and Medicaid this summer. Some of the insanity in all this comes from the fact that these programs for seniors and the needy have been cut and continue to be slated for cuts in the future. So what the devil are these clowns in Washington celebrating when the real fact is they really want to bury these programs?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal health care officials agreed Wednesday to "take a fresh look" at Medicare billing guidelines that have compounded Ventura County's fiscal troubles by withholding $3 million in reimbursements for county clinics and could siphon away an additional $1.6 million annually. At a meeting in Washington, Chief Administrative Officer Harry Hufford and other county officials urged Thomas A. Gustafson, director of the purchasing policy group of the U.S.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
A private California company under government contract to guard against inappropriate health care for the state's 3 million Medicare patients has been accused in a recently unsealed federal lawsuit of fraudulently signing off on tens of thousands of cases without ever reviewing them. The U.S. attorney's office in San Francisco has joined two company whistle-blowers in a civil lawsuit against California Medical Review Inc., a nonprofit San Francisco company also known as CMRI, whose explosive growth has been fueled during the last four years by its contract with the federal government to review all hospitalizations in California reimbursed through the federal Medicare program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The latest version of the federal government's Medicare hospital mortality information demonstrates that the U.S Health Care Financing Administration has markedly improved the statistical techniques used in preparing the massive study. For example, it has taken into account the percentage of emergency cases and nursing home transfers among a hospital's cases.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
A private California company under government contract to guard against inappropriate health care for the state's 3 million Medicare patients has been accused in a recently unsealed federal lawsuit of fraudulently signing off on tens of thousands of cases without ever reviewing them. The U.S. attorney's office in San Francisco has joined two company whistle-blowers in a civil lawsuit against California Medical Review Inc., a nonprofit San Francisco company also known as CMRI, whose explosive growth has been fueled during the last four years by its contract with the federal government to review all hospitalizations in California reimbursed through the federal Medicare program.
NEWS
May 19, 1989
More than 40% of the nation's physicians are limiting their charges for Medicare patients, the Health Care Financing Administration said in Washington. HCFA said 283,475 physicians--40.7% of the 696,848 doctors who bill Medicare--signed agreements with the government in January saying they would not charge Medicare patients more than the government reimburses. The figure is up from 37.3% last year.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | From Times wire services
More physicians are agreeing to limit their charges for Medicare patients, although it is harder to find such a doctor in some states than in others, the government said today. The Health Care Financing Administration reported that 283,475 physicians--40.7% of the 696,848 doctors who bill Medicare--have signed agreements for this year to charge Medicare patients no more than the government-approved amount. That's an increase from 37.3% in 1988 and 30.6% in 1987, and accounts for more than 60% of the total Medicare spending on physicians' services, said Louis B. Hays, acting administrator of HFCA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
A dispute over treatment of a spider bite on a transient's leg may lead to the loss of Medicare insurance payments for a prominent hospital in Sherman Oaks, federal officials disclosed Friday. Medicare accreditation for Sherman Oaks Community Hospital will be revoked on Nov. 20 unless the hospital overhauls its emergency-room policy, the Department of Health and Human Services said.
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