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NEWS
March 11, 1999 | From the Washington Post
Federal officials will soon begin collecting personal information about millions of homebound patients--including details about their mental stability, financial status and living arrangements--in an effort to improve service in the home health care industry.
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NEWS
March 23, 2001 | Associated Press
President Bush nominated a hospital industry leader who served in his father's administration to head the agency that runs Medicare, the White House said Thursday. Thomas A. Scully, president of the Federation of American Hospitals, was a domestic policy official under President George Bush. If confirmed by the Senate, Scully would lead the Health Care Financing Administration, an arm of the Health and Human Services Department.
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NEWS
March 23, 2001 | Associated Press
President Bush nominated a hospital industry leader who served in his father's administration to head the agency that runs Medicare, the White House said Thursday. Thomas A. Scully, president of the Federation of American Hospitals, was a domestic policy official under President George Bush. If confirmed by the Senate, Scully would lead the Health Care Financing Administration, an arm of the Health and Human Services Department.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | From the Washington Post
The Medicare program said Friday it will begin paying for an expensive test called positron emission tomography for use in the diagnosis of nearly half the cases of cancer each year in America's elderly. The decision could add hundreds of millions of dollars to the cost of the Medicare program. Each PET scan, which detects increased metabolic activity in cancerous tissue, costs about $2,000.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1998 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The honeymoon era of low inflation for medical spending is over, and the nation's bill for hospitals, doctors and pharmaceuticals will jump sharply over the next 10 years, the federal government warned Monday. The growth in outlays for medical care, which slowed to an adjusted 1.3% annually from 1993 through 1997, will climb to 3.3% annually for the period ending in 2007, according to the forecast by the Health Care Financing Administration.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1997 | (David Olmos)
Federal investigators have released a critical report detailing patient-care problems at Kaiser Permanente's hospitals in Oakland and Richmond discovered during a surprise inspection in March. The inspection followed reports of deaths of three patients transferred from Kaiser's Richmond hospital last winter. Among the report's findings were inexplicable delays in transferring patients, short staffing and inadequate quality-control procedures.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | Associated Press
President Clinton said he intends to nominate one of his White House budget office aides to head the nation's Medicaid and Medicare programs. Clinton said he wants Nancy-Ann Min DeParle, associate director of the Office of Management and Budget for health and personnel, to head the Health Care Financing Administration in the Department of Health and Human Services.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1991 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Critics of FHP International Corp. reacted with disappointment to news this week that the health-maintenance organization had been given a near-clean bill of health after a six-month federal investigation into its sales methods to seniors. "I think we will gradually start seeing the same abuses as before because (FHP) got away with it," Dr. Ronald Bronow, president of an anti-HMO group called Physicians Who Care, said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Doctors at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City, Calif., thought the government would be grateful five years ago when they cleared the clogged artery of Medicare recipient Bernard Jameson by using a new balloon catheter device instead of an $18,000 bypass surgery. After all, the procedure cost a mere $2,643.
NEWS
October 13, 1987
The Health Care Financing Administration is developing a plan to use cost incentives and lists of preferred doctors to lower the cost of the Medicare program, the administrator of the HCFA said. Dr. William L. Roper, in a telephone interview, said a plan under review calls for development of lists of doctors who would carry the designation of "preferred providers." Medicare patients would be steered to these doctors by financial incentives to patients.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | From the Washington Post
Federal officials will soon begin collecting personal information about millions of homebound patients--including details about their mental stability, financial status and living arrangements--in an effort to improve service in the home health care industry.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1998 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The honeymoon era of low inflation for medical spending is over, and the nation's bill for hospitals, doctors and pharmaceuticals will jump sharply over the next 10 years, the federal government warned Monday. The growth in outlays for medical care, which slowed to an adjusted 1.3% annually from 1993 through 1997, will climb to 3.3% annually for the period ending in 2007, according to the forecast by the Health Care Financing Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators have again delayed full-fledged start-up of the massive new managed care program for the poor in Los Angeles County, saying they have seen little progress in key areas of the state's implementation plan, including an advertising campaign and community outreach. The decision means the multibillion-dollar Medi-Cal managed care program--the largest of its kind in the nation, covering more than 1 million beneficiaries--will not be in full swing until Jan.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | Associated Press
President Clinton said he intends to nominate one of his White House budget office aides to head the nation's Medicaid and Medicare programs. Clinton said he wants Nancy-Ann Min DeParle, associate director of the Office of Management and Budget for health and personnel, to head the Health Care Financing Administration in the Department of Health and Human Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators have again refused to allow full implementation of L.A. Care, the nation's largest local managed care program serving the poor, saying they still aren't convinced the Los Angeles County program is ready to go. Regulators with the U.S. Health Care Financing Administration notified the state late last week that they want to see more progress in an enrollment and community outreach plan before allowing L.A. Care to proceed full throttle. L.A.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1997 | (David Olmos)
Federal investigators have released a critical report detailing patient-care problems at Kaiser Permanente's hospitals in Oakland and Richmond discovered during a surprise inspection in March. The inspection followed reports of deaths of three patients transferred from Kaiser's Richmond hospital last winter. Among the report's findings were inexplicable delays in transferring patients, short staffing and inadequate quality-control procedures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators have again delayed full-fledged start-up of the massive new managed care program for the poor in Los Angeles County, saying they have seen little progress in key areas of the state's implementation plan, including an advertising campaign and community outreach. The decision means the multibillion-dollar Medi-Cal managed care program--the largest of its kind in the nation, covering more than 1 million beneficiaries--will not be in full swing until Jan.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
In the wake of a California man's successful bid to receive Medicare reimbursement for a new type of heart operation, a national panel studying how the Medicare program pays for new medical technology Wednesday recommended that U.S. agencies quicken their review of new procedures and allow more public scrutiny of the murky process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators have instructed the state to immediately suspend plans for automatic enrollment of poor people in managed care in Los Angeles County, saying the new process--the largest and most complex undertaking of its kind in the country--may be too confusing for Medi-Cal beneficiaries. The U.S.
NEWS
February 25, 1992
President Bush said Monday he is moving Gail R. Wilensky, the head of the agency that runs Medicare and Medicaid, to his White House staff as a deputy to new domestic policy coordinator Clayton K. Yeutter. Wilensky, an economist and former professor, has been administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration since 1990. She will have the title of deputy assistant to the President for policy development.
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