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Health Care Industry California

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BUSINESS
July 6, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PacifiCare Health Systems, which owns the nation's largest managed-care plan for Medicare recipients, said Wednesday it will drop 26,600 members who live in what it says are unprofitable regions and will raise prices and lower benefits for the nearly 1 million Medicare members who remain.
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BUSINESS
July 6, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PacifiCare Health Systems, which owns the nation's largest managed-care plan for Medicare recipients, said Wednesday it will drop 26,600 members who live in what it says are unprofitable regions and will raise prices and lower benefits for the nearly 1 million Medicare members who remain.
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BUSINESS
September 14, 1993 | DAVID R. OLMOS and THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's health reform proposal would accelerate changes already swamping the medical industry in California, placing new pressures on the state's burgeoning biotechnology industry, speeding consolidation among hospitals and giving already influential health maintenance organizations an even greater share of the California market.
HEALTH
March 13, 2000 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A health care crisis appears to be building for California's poorest, most vulnerable youngsters, who often must wait months or travel long distances to see pediatric specialists in such critical areas as orthopedics and neurology. With Medi-Cal paying physicians some of the lowest reimbursement rates in the nation, increasing numbers of children's doctors are limiting their participation in the insurance program for the poor and disabled.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1994 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health insurers on Thursday denounced a package of reform measures approved by the Legislature that are intended to protect consumers from abuses by health maintenance organizations. Insurers said the three measures--now awaiting Gov. Pete Wilson's signature before they can become law--would impose costly and unneeded government regulations on the industry. A spokesman for Wilson said the governor has made no decision yet about the bills. The measures--strongly opposed by the California Assn.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1996 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was mid-November, and Malik M. Hasan and Leonard D. Schaeffer, flanked by their lawyers, were meeting at the Woodland Hills Marriott. The meeting, which had been called to smooth out final details in a $1.6-billion merger of their two health-care companies, suddenly collapsed after Hasan accused Schaeffer of reneging on key terms of the deal. Hasan lashed out angrily at a lawyer for Schaeffer's company: "You're a liar and a cheat," Hasan said, "and I'm outta here."
BUSINESS
January 6, 1999 | KAREN E. KLEIN
Richard W. Antoine's health-care translation business blanketed the market for California medical providers, he had to make a decision: Would he continue to grow his business by expanding out of state? Antoine knew that establishing satellite offices would be costly and time-consuming. So he found a way to sell additional services to his existing clients. Antoine was interviewed by freelance writer Karen E. Klein.
HEALTH
March 13, 2000 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A health care crisis appears to be building for California's poorest, most vulnerable youngsters, who often must wait months or travel long distances to see pediatric specialists in such critical areas as orthopedics and neurology. With Medi-Cal paying physicians some of the lowest reimbursement rates in the nation, increasing numbers of children's doctors are limiting their participation in the insurance program for the poor and disabled.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1993
Though President Clinton has yet to unveil his economic plan for the nation (he does that tonight), the outlines of his program have been spelled out in the past week. Here is how it looks California is going to be affected: Small Businesses Clinton plans to cut capital gains taxes for investments in start-up businesses that may help create new jobs in California, as people laid off from some of the state's more troubled industries are encouraged to start businesses of their own.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2000
Re "Hospitals Threatening to Drop Blue Cross," Aug. 2: I have recently been the unwitting victim of a Blue Cross-versus-hospital conflict over the level of payment for services to me in March 1999. For a bill of $3,495.34 submitted by Arcadia Methodist Hospital to Blue Cross, my two policies paid a total of $344.50--less than 10% of the total. Note that I am covered by two top-of-the-line policies--the most expensive and comprehensive offered by my employer and my husband's employer. Blue Cross notified me that I owed nothing on this bill.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1999 | KAREN E. KLEIN
Richard W. Antoine's health-care translation business blanketed the market for California medical providers, he had to make a decision: Would he continue to grow his business by expanding out of state? Antoine knew that establishing satellite offices would be costly and time-consuming. So he found a way to sell additional services to his existing clients. Antoine was interviewed by freelance writer Karen E. Klein.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1996 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was mid-November, and Malik M. Hasan and Leonard D. Schaeffer, flanked by their lawyers, were meeting at the Woodland Hills Marriott. The meeting, which had been called to smooth out final details in a $1.6-billion merger of their two health-care companies, suddenly collapsed after Hasan accused Schaeffer of reneging on key terms of the deal. Hasan lashed out angrily at a lawyer for Schaeffer's company: "You're a liar and a cheat," Hasan said, "and I'm outta here."
BUSINESS
September 2, 1994 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health insurers on Thursday denounced a package of reform measures approved by the Legislature that are intended to protect consumers from abuses by health maintenance organizations. Insurers said the three measures--now awaiting Gov. Pete Wilson's signature before they can become law--would impose costly and unneeded government regulations on the industry. A spokesman for Wilson said the governor has made no decision yet about the bills. The measures--strongly opposed by the California Assn.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1993 | DAVID R. OLMOS and THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's health reform proposal would accelerate changes already swamping the medical industry in California, placing new pressures on the state's burgeoning biotechnology industry, speeding consolidation among hospitals and giving already influential health maintenance organizations an even greater share of the California market.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1993 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move likely to accelerate cost-cutting efforts throughout the state's health care industry, the California Public Employees Retirement System has asked 18 health maintenance organizations to cut their insurance premiums by 5% next year. The requested rate rollback, which would affect nearly 1 million Californians, is the boldest move yet by CalPERS to use its clout as one of the nation's largest health care purchasing groups to pressure HMOs to rein in costs.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton rode to victory on a platform of economic growth, and that could mean good things for recession-mired California--provided the President-elect can deliver on his campaign promises.
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