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BUSINESS
June 21, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Coalition Obtains Rate Cuts: The Pacific Business Group, one of the nation's largest health insurance purchasing coalitions, has negotiated premium rollbacks averaging 4.3% with 15 major California health maintenance organizations. The private purchasing group said 13 of 15 HMOs agreed to reduce their rates. The new rates take effect in January and will affect about 330,00 employees and their families and about $400 million in annual medical premiums.
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BUSINESS
June 17, 2003 | Debora Vrana and Don Lee, Times Staff Writers
In a sign that the rate of health-care inflation may be slowing, the California Public Employees' Retirement System is proposing an 18% increase in medical insurance premiums next year for most of its 1.2 million members. Last year, CalPERS approved a 25% hike in HMO premiums, a boost that highlighted the nation's dramatic run-up in health-care costs and the financial strains that it put on many families.
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NEWS
May 28, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
A plan sponsored by state Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi that would provide a system of health care insurance for all Californians, including the 6 million who are without coverage, was approved Wednesday by the Senate Insurance Committee. Carried by Assemblyman Burt Margolin (D-Los Angeles), the Garamendi bill is one of at least three health care insurance proposals advancing in the Legislature. A final product may be fashioned late in the summer in negotiations with Gov.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2002 | VICKI KEMPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of Americans without health insurance jumped significantly last year after declining for the previous two years, the Census Bureau reported today. The report found a large drop in job-based health insurance, which analysts said was caused by a combination of rapidly rising health-care costs and a weak economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1989
"Our Health Care Is Sick" goes the heading on an editorial (Jan. 16) and assuredly a fair appraisal it is. The term "socialized medicine" is anathema to many Americans and just in my lifetime I have observed a number of stopgap measures that have been devised to forestall such a horror. The first effort was the organization of Veterans Administration Hospitals to care for the needs of World War I veterans. Then came individual private health insurance. About 1965 Medicare and Medicaid were adopted to provide reasonable health care for the aged and disabled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1993 | As Told to ROBERT SCHEER
Ann Turner is a 46-year-old doctor who graduated from USC Medical School. After working at the City of Hope for several years she went to Thailand and cared for Cambodian refugees. Twelve years ago, she and family nurse practitioner Catherine Bax opened the South-Central Family Health Center. We're the only private nonprofit community clinic in this area. Most of the patients we see are undocumented immigrants, mostly from Mexico and some from Central America.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2000 | Associated Press
Blue Shield of California will be licensed by the state to provide health services to employees on both sides of the Mexican border. Gov. Gray Davis made the announcement during opening ceremonies for the 18th annual Border Governors Conference in Sacramento. An estimated 40,000 to 50,000 Mexicans cross the border each day to work legally in the San Diego area.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1999 | John O'Dell
McKenna & Associates, a regional insurance brokerage specializing in coverage for providers of managed health care, has been acquired by a unit of Chicago's Aon Corp. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. McKenna, with 24 employees, is headquartered in Irvine and has offices in San Diego, Los Angeles, St. Louis, Miami and Scottsdale, Ariz.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | Agnes Herman, Agnes Herman is a writer, lecturer and retired social worker living in Lake San Marcos
None of us expects to be struck by a long-term, debilitating illness. Our unspoken feelings of invincibility keep us from planning sufficiently, if at all, for what could be a vulnerable future. "It cannot happen to me! It dare not," we tell ourselves. We do not expect to fall prey to Parkinson's or Alzheimer's diseases, diabetes, a disabling auto accident, or the lesser complications of old age. But what we expect and what we get are frequently opposites.
OPINION
October 9, 1994
Proposition 186, the ballot initiative that would establish a new system of paying for health care in California, sprang from a deep well of understandable frustration over the crazy-quilt system that exists now. Americans for the last two years have heard President Clinton articulate what's wrong with the nation's health care insurance system: too expensive, too unreliable, too exclusionary.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2002 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from hospitals, Blue Cross of California has backed off selling "tiered hospital" policies, which group hospitals by cost and increase co-payments for consumers who use the costlier facilities. Senior executives at Blue Cross, the state's largest health insurer, said the company changed course after encountering vigorous opposition from hospitals.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2001 | KEITH SNIDER, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Aetna Inc., the biggest U.S. health insurer, said Tuesday that first-quarter profit was "significantly" below analyst estimates as medical costs rose more than expected. Aetna shares plunged almost 18% and cast a pall over other HMO stocks. Aetna also said 2001 profit may be lower than the $1.20 to $1.30 a share it previously forecast. The company will take a first-quarter charge of $90 million before taxes for additional medical costs from before the first of this year.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to moderate the pervasive instability racking health care in California and other states, managed-care companies have begun paying more to doctors and hospitals and eliminating some of the more onerous aspects of their contracts. Many no longer are forcing doctors to pay the bills themselves when their patients go into the hospital, for example, or bear the full cost of prescription drugs. On Tuesday, Aetna Inc.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City leaders Tuesday slammed the brakes on a proposal to make this metropolis in the heart of the Silicon Valley the nation's first to provide universal health insurance for children. A split City Council narrowly rejected the proposal to tap about $2 million a year in tobacco settlement money to help provide health coverage for the 37,000 children now without it in the city.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2000 | Associated Press
Blue Shield of California will be licensed by the state to provide health services to employees on both sides of the Mexican border. Gov. Gray Davis made the announcement during opening ceremonies for the 18th annual Border Governors Conference in Sacramento. An estimated 40,000 to 50,000 Mexicans cross the border each day to work legally in the San Diego area.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2000 | From Reuters
Aetna U.S. Healthcare, a unit of insurance giant Aetna Inc., said Wednesday that it will end coverage of bone marrow transplants for patients with breast cancer unless they are in a federal research study. The transplants are done as part of a last-ditch therapy in which the body is blitzed with extremely high doses of toxic drugs. This is meant to kill the cancer, but it also kills off the bone marrow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Via a satellite hookup from Washington, where he had been meeting with Clinton Administration officials, state Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi on Thursday gave local business people some clues about national health insurance proposals likely to emerge this year. Garamendi told the Irvine Chamber of Commerce that there is a great need for national health insurance available "to everyone who is in the country legally."
BUSINESS
March 27, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private sector is emerging as a new battleground in a debate that has long consumed municipal governments--whether to extend employee benefits to the domestic partners of unmarried workers. On Tuesday, in a move that advocates of such benefits called "groundbreaking," a major New York medical center with 9,000 employees became the largest private employer in the United States to extend spousal benefits, including health insurance, to lesbian and gay staffers.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Foundation Health Systems Inc., one of California's biggest health insurers, said Friday it will probably drop about 5% of its current 283,000 Medicare enrollees in 2000. The company said it is planning to drop Medicare health maintenance organization coverage in about 20 counties where it is losing money or in danger of doing so because health costs are growing faster than Medicare reimbursements.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1999 | John O'Dell
McKenna & Associates, a regional insurance brokerage specializing in coverage for providers of managed health care, has been acquired by a unit of Chicago's Aon Corp. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. McKenna, with 24 employees, is headquartered in Irvine and has offices in San Diego, Los Angeles, St. Louis, Miami and Scottsdale, Ariz.
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