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Health Care United States

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the demise of global health-care reform and sweeping efforts at controlling costs, experts said, the new Congress is eyeing Medicare and Medicaid hungrily, bent on slicing what they see as the fat from these fast-growing programs. * Federal officials and industry representatives said at a conference Thursday that these two programs are seen as major forces driving up federal spending, and they are likely to be targeted by politicians pledging deficit reduction.
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NEWS
March 6, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the health care industry, they're known as "doctor extenders" because they provide care that has traditionally been in the physician's realm. And as health care costs climb, the ranks of doctor extenders are growing, leaving consumers to wonder: Who is this person? And what is his or her training? Here's a rundown of three types of health care professionals you might see the next time you visit a doctor's office, clinic or hospital.
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NEWS
March 6, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the health care industry, they're known as "doctor extenders" because they provide care that has traditionally been in the physician's realm. And as health care costs climb, the ranks of doctor extenders are growing, leaving consumers to wonder: Who is this person? And what is his or her training? Here's a rundown of three types of health care professionals you might see the next time you visit a doctor's office, clinic or hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the demise of global health-care reform and sweeping efforts at controlling costs, experts said, the new Congress is eyeing Medicare and Medicaid hungrily, bent on slicing what they see as the fat from these fast-growing programs. * Federal officials and industry representatives said at a conference Thursday that these two programs are seen as major forces driving up federal spending, and they are likely to be targeted by politicians pledging deficit reduction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989
It is time to think more about our greatest national weakness, namely health care. We have just had a bitter taste of being taxed on tax to support so-called catastrophic health care. The United States has 37 million people who are uninsured and 10 million to 12 million of that number are our children. Politicians tell us we have the best medical facilities in the world, but go on to say that only 30% can afford those facilities. The other 70% must go without care or go bankrupt.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Beyond even jobs and the economy, the gut-wrenching question for most people is: Can the Clinton Administration bring order to the chaos in the nation's health care system? That question took on heightened meaning Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court's decision that an employee's health coverage can be cut abruptly when he or she contracts a chronic disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1995
Rainfall brings the sparkle back to dirty streets, parking lots and buildings. But all the grime and litter doesn't just disappear. It washes untreated into the ocean via storm drains and pollutes coastal waters. How urban runoff affects the coast: Unseen Pollutants Urban runoff picks up toxic substances as it washes over freeways, streets, parking lots, lawns, construction sites and industrial facilities.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1990 | DAVID M. GORDON, DAVID M. GORDON is professor of economics at the New School for Social Research in New York.
One of our nation's greatest shames is our health-care system. We spend hundreds of billions of dollars on health care while neglecting the basic health needs of millions of Americans. When will we wake up to the urgent need for a more rational, less wasteful and more equitable health-care system? Fortunately, a growing majority of people is beginning to favor dramatic changes in our health-care system.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years of capitalism have created a new face for Russia's space program, and it is starting to look a lot like its longtime rival: corporate America. At once-secret Soviet facilities, Russian and American engineers now work together to design and build space vehicles. U.S. firms such as Lockheed Martin and Hughes Electronics collaborate with Russia on commercial satellite launches. Astronauts and cosmonauts train side by side for joint missions in space.
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