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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was elderly and suffering from severe asthma. Her Medi-Cal benefits were cut off Jan. 1 because the county said she had not submitted the proper forms. The woman said she had turned in the paperwork three times. The woman, who desperately needed medical care, was at a dead end. But in early March she found Nora Boyajian, a paralegal counselor with the Health Consumer Center, a free advocacy hotline that assists low-income Los Angeles County residents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was elderly and suffering from severe asthma. Her Medi-Cal benefits were cut off Jan. 1 because the county said she had not submitted the proper forms. The woman said she had turned in the paperwork three times. The woman, who desperately needed medical care, was at a dead end. But in early March she found Nora Boyajian, a paralegal counselor with the Health Consumer Center, a free advocacy hotline that assists low-income Los Angeles County residents.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 1999
Having trouble getting the medical care you need? Health-maintenance organizations and insurance companies typically get the blame for delaying or denying visits to specialists and other types of care. Increasingly, though, the rejections are coming from the medical group with which your doctor is affiliated. And now that some medical groups face financial problems, the situation could get even trickier for consumers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2003 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Low-income patients are frequently denied necessary dental care for which they are entitled under the state's Medi-Cal public health insurance program, according to a new report by consumer advocates. The document was prepared by the Health Consumer Alliance, which is a consortium of legal services groups for the poor, along with the Health Rights Hotline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time 4-year-old Juan Carlos visited a dentist, his teeth were decayed and he cried from the pain of his gum infection. He needed immediate care and two teeth were eventually extracted. His mother thought that she had enrolled him in a government-assisted health insurance program that would cover the costs. But like other poor and recent immigrants, she discovered too late that she had been victimized. Months earlier, she had called a toll-free number that she read on a flier.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The twin problems of housing and health care that plague the northeast San Fernando Valley have defied solution yet remain at the center of debate at all levels of society and government. On the national level, presidential contenders have put the two issues high on their lists of priorities. Democrat Al Gore has proposed expanding an existing tax credit program by $5.7 billion over 10 years to allow construction of 180,000 rental homes or homes for ownership. Republican George W.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A state program that provides health care coverage for uninsured children would be expanded, with money from California's tobacco settlement, to include 300,000 parents under a proposal submitted to Washington this week by Gov. Gray Davis' administration. Details of the proposed expansion of Healthy Families, outlined in the request to U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala, were received warmly by health care experts and activists for the uninsured.
HEALTH
September 27, 1999 | PETER V. LEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not long ago, your family doctor decided the type of care you needed and made the necessary arrangements. Today, health care is much more complicated. While your primary doctor is responsible for overseeing your medical care and treatment, lots of others may also play a role. Other doctors, nurses and health professionals, as well as insurance companies, administrators and your employer may also have a say in the type of care you receive, where you get it and who provides it.
HEALTH
July 3, 2000 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Patients with health insurance often don't think about how they're going to get to the hospital or a doctor's appointment, simply feeling secure in the promise of medical care when needed. After all, if there's an emergency, they can call 911 and their insurance generally will cover all or most of the ambulance trip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2002 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps the best place to see how Orange County's health care system for poor adults has evolved over the years is at UC Irvine Medical Center's busy outpatient clinic in Santa Ana. There, doctors last year treated 2,195 patients who qualified for the county's Medical Services for Indigents program--people who live in nearby public housing and people from as far as Laguna Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR and PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When 8-year-old Evelyn Salcedo needed a tonsillectomy, her mother took her to Michoacan for the operation. The reason: Ana Salcedo had been charged $400 earlier for tests at a hospital in the San Fernando Valley. Without insurance, government assistance or private means, Salcedo could only afford a doctor in Mexico. It was the same for Rosaura Haro. When she and her daughter needed medical tests, she went south.
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