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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1985
Jacobs' three articles on the pervasive problems in the field of mental health are commendable in that they provide your readers with various points of view regarding the background and causes that gave rise to those problems. In order to set the record straight, I must point out some inaccuracies in the statements attributed in the series to Michael O'Connor, state director of mental health. It is far from the truth to say that California spends more than any other state on local mental health programs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1998
I would like to thank Glenn Melnick ("Keep Sacramento Out of HMO Reform," Commentary, Feb. 25) for demonstrating, however inadvertently, why health care must be regulated by government. If we don't do something in Sacramento, Melnick's philosophy might prevail to the detriment of all. The focus of his article is exclusively, completely and unremittingly on cost. The argument is premised on the notion that managed care is a good system because it is a cheap system. This has been at the heart of the massive and growing public discontent with managed care, mostly because it all but ignores the question of quality.
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BUSINESS
June 14, 1992
The article "California's Highest-Paid Business Executives" (May 17) certainly gives a clue to the destination of many health dollars. How many underserved maternity patients and children might be helped by the multimillion-dollar salaries of the officers at National Medical Enterprises? The exorbitant profits (and the concomitant outrageous incomes of pharmaceutical company CEOs) posted by drug firms can be explained by sky-high prescription prices paid by debilitated seniors with marginal incomes.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1992
The article "California's Highest-Paid Business Executives" (May 17) certainly gives a clue to the destination of many health dollars. How many underserved maternity patients and children might be helped by the multimillion-dollar salaries of the officers at National Medical Enterprises? The exorbitant profits (and the concomitant outrageous incomes of pharmaceutical company CEOs) posted by drug firms can be explained by sky-high prescription prices paid by debilitated seniors with marginal incomes.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1989
In his March 26 Viewpoints column, "HMOs Are Far From DOA: Despite Their Numerous Problems, Health Maintenance Organizations Are Here to Stay," Dr. Brant S. Mittler used scare tactics in another attempt to influence public opinion against HMOs. This time, he is "warning" that many people may be encouraged to join an HMO. Survey after survey indicates that HMO members find the coverage, cost and quality of care preferable to the fee-for-service system. Members give their HMOs high marks for the caring attitude of the physicians, availability of appointments at short notice and the extent of their coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1998
I would like to thank Glenn Melnick ("Keep Sacramento Out of HMO Reform," Commentary, Feb. 25) for demonstrating, however inadvertently, why health care must be regulated by government. If we don't do something in Sacramento, Melnick's philosophy might prevail to the detriment of all. The focus of his article is exclusively, completely and unremittingly on cost. The argument is premised on the notion that managed care is a good system because it is a cheap system. This has been at the heart of the massive and growing public discontent with managed care, mostly because it all but ignores the question of quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
Mental health advocates, buoyed by the discovery of a windfall in state sales tax revenue, turned their political sights Friday on the $2.5-billion surplus as an unexpected savior for mental health programs in Los Angeles and other counties. Outlining a plan to tap the sudden largess, a trio of state legislators unveiled a proposal that would reserve $175 million of the newly found money for mental health programs that have already suffered drastic cuts. "The mental health system is the worst-funded system--period--in the state of California," Assemblyman Bruce Bronzan (D-Fresno)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1988
Our organization receives numerous calls from families here in Orange County wanting health care for their mentally ill son or daughter. Many ask why Orange County has so few beds and services contrasted with other counties. The Times article ("Officials Decry Lack of Mental Health Funds," Nov. 29) aptly described the issues for a situation in which (using fiscal 1986-87 figures) San Francisco, with a population of about 700,000, received $54.08 in state mental health funds per person and Orange County, with a population of 2.2 million, received only $17.56.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1987
The addition of Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian's new heart transplant program (Feb. 18) provides an opportunity for the Orange County community to examine the myriad of ethical, legal and financial issues in health care policies and practices. Hoag Hospital is deservedly considered one of the finest in the county, and so it concerns me to learn that it was not the hospital's initial aim to start a transplant program but that the decision was made to accommodate Drs. Aidam Raney and Douglas Zusman's conditions of employment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1989
Although it gets more than one-third of the state mental health dollars, Los Angeles County has been shortchanged because the funding formula does not account for the homeless mentally ill, the county grand jury said Friday. "Even though Los Angeles County has had 42.1% of admissions for the severely mentally ill, it has received only 34.6% of state funding," the jury said in a report to the Board of Supervisors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
Mental health advocates, buoyed by the discovery of a windfall in state sales tax revenue, turned their political sights Friday on the $2.5-billion surplus as an unexpected savior for mental health programs in Los Angeles and other counties. Outlining a plan to tap the sudden largess, a trio of state legislators unveiled a proposal that would reserve $175 million of the newly found money for mental health programs that have already suffered drastic cuts. "The mental health system is the worst-funded system--period--in the state of California," Assemblyman Bruce Bronzan (D-Fresno)
BUSINESS
April 16, 1989
In his March 26 Viewpoints column, "HMOs Are Far From DOA: Despite Their Numerous Problems, Health Maintenance Organizations Are Here to Stay," Dr. Brant S. Mittler used scare tactics in another attempt to influence public opinion against HMOs. This time, he is "warning" that many people may be encouraged to join an HMO. Survey after survey indicates that HMO members find the coverage, cost and quality of care preferable to the fee-for-service system. Members give their HMOs high marks for the caring attitude of the physicians, availability of appointments at short notice and the extent of their coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1988
Our organization receives numerous calls from families here in Orange County wanting health care for their mentally ill son or daughter. Many ask why Orange County has so few beds and services contrasted with other counties. The Times article ("Officials Decry Lack of Mental Health Funds," Nov. 29) aptly described the issues for a situation in which (using fiscal 1986-87 figures) San Francisco, with a population of about 700,000, received $54.08 in state mental health funds per person and Orange County, with a population of 2.2 million, received only $17.56.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1987
The addition of Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian's new heart transplant program (Feb. 18) provides an opportunity for the Orange County community to examine the myriad of ethical, legal and financial issues in health care policies and practices. Hoag Hospital is deservedly considered one of the finest in the county, and so it concerns me to learn that it was not the hospital's initial aim to start a transplant program but that the decision was made to accommodate Drs. Aidam Raney and Douglas Zusman's conditions of employment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1985
Jacobs' three articles on the pervasive problems in the field of mental health are commendable in that they provide your readers with various points of view regarding the background and causes that gave rise to those problems. In order to set the record straight, I must point out some inaccuracies in the statements attributed in the series to Michael O'Connor, state director of mental health. It is far from the truth to say that California spends more than any other state on local mental health programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1999
Re "Managed-Care Ads: Rx for Image Ills?" Aug. 6: The managed care health insurance industry is willing to spend $11.5 million to market to the public that it is selling a good service rather than reaping profits. Where else in the world would limited health care dollars be spent for advertising that benefits the industry? This money is being spent to forestall regulation in addition to the greater amount that is spent on lobbying and campaign contributions. Limited health care dollars that come from government-funded programs, hard-earned consumer dollars and employer contributions are used to persuade consumers to pay up and lawmakers to keep their hands off, while appropriate care is denied to ensure higher profits.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | From Times wire services
Federal spending on AIDS has totaled $5.5 billion since 1982, researchers said today in a study termed the first overall accounting of federal efforts to combat the deadly acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Federal AIDS expenditures will be about $2.2 billion for 1989, tripling state expenditures on the disease, and are expected to reach $4.3 billion in 1992, the researchers said. "Although sizable, this will be just 1.8% of all 1992 health dollars," said the researchers, whose study appears in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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